YOU SUCK PAUL McCartney
Greg

Athens, Greece

#135 Mar 1, 2014
What about the Yardbirds or the Kinks? They recorded some hard rock items before Jimi came out and recorded that classical album. However, it was in an interview that Paul explained how he wrote "Helter Skelter". I don't remember all the things he said, what I remembered is that when he heard "I can see for miles" by the Who, he also was annoyed somehow by the statement of Daltrey that it was the heaviest thing ever recorded. And Paul with his band mates showed him!
Octopus

Albany, NY

#136 Mar 1, 2014
Greg wrote:
What about the Yardbirds or the Kinks? They recorded some hard rock items before Jimi came out and recorded that classical album. However, it was in an interview that Paul explained how he wrote "Helter Skelter". I don't remember all the things he said, what I remembered is that when he heard "I can see for miles" by the Who, he also was annoyed somehow by the statement of Daltrey that it was the heaviest thing ever recorded. And Paul with his band mates showed him!
Jimi Hendrix was an amazing artist because he was doing things that were so advanced beyond anything that was ever done before. "Are You Experienced" was his first album in 1967 but it wasn't exactly Heavy Metal, rather an introduction to what Jimi was doing at the time. Do not get me wrong, "Helter Skelter" is a great song but to not give other artists credit for creating heavy music before The Beatles is pure ignorance. I'd pinpoint the orgins of Heavy Metal from the many guitar instrumental bands of the fifties and sixties. Of course, it was just of matter of time before it would be showing up in other musician's work. Link Wray's "Rumble" was recorded in 1954 or somewhere around that time. It had a slow, heavy beat. The Burnett Trio recorded "Train Kept A Rollin" Roy Orbison's "Oh, Pretty Woman" Johnny Kidd And The Pirates "Shakin' All Over" The Troggs "Wild Thing" Heavier forms of rock were already being done. The seeds of progress. The Beach Boys were part of the surf intrumental sound at the beginning like Dick Dale's "Trippin" It only makes sense that Brian Wilson would try "Mrs O'Leary's Cow"

I think what made Jimi Hendrix special was that he loved music and listened to everything to create his own sound. He was taking all in and used his guitar as his emotional musical voice. He was a genius.
Octopus

Albany, NY

#137 Mar 1, 2014
The Yardbirds, The Kinks and The Who did some heavier rock n roll that were different in their presentation. It made them who they were just like any band that was trying to be original. It was the creativity of the era, which is why the music still holds up. Since I am bored with listening to the same bands I've heard billions of times before, it is always cool to check out what lesser bands were doing in the same period also. You would be surprised. I want to be open minded and that is why I've dug into bands like The Flamin' Groovies and MC5. I like discovering older bands that may not have been household names but made great music nevertheless.
Greg

Athens, Greece

#138 Mar 1, 2014
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
Jimi Hendrix was an amazing artist because he was doing things that were so advanced beyond anything that was ever done before. "Are You Experienced" was his first album in 1967 but it wasn't exactly Heavy Metal, rather an introduction to what Jimi was doing at the time. Do not get me wrong, "Helter Skelter" is a great song but to not give other artists credit for creating heavy music before The Beatles is pure ignorance. I'd pinpoint the orgins of Heavy Metal from the many guitar instrumental bands of the fifties and sixties. Of course, it was just of matter of time before it would be showing up in other musician's work. Link Wray's "Rumble" was recorded in 1954 or somewhere around that time. It had a slow, heavy beat. The Burnett Trio recorded "Train Kept A Rollin" Roy Orbison's "Oh, Pretty Woman" Johnny Kidd And The Pirates "Shakin' All Over" The Troggs "Wild Thing" Heavier forms of rock were already being done. The seeds of progress. The Beach Boys were part of the surf intrumental sound at the beginning like Dick Dale's "Trippin" It only makes sense that Brian Wilson would try "Mrs O'Leary's Cow"
I think what made Jimi Hendrix special was that he loved music and listened to everything to create his own sound. He was taking all in and used his guitar as his emotional musical voice. He was a genius.
In my point of view, Dave Davies and his passion with the distorted guitar sound did contribute to it as well as the Sonics' Andy or Larry Parypa(I don't remember who was the lead guitarist of the band). I don't claim that everything had the Beatles as starters unless there is a proof about it. Let's don't forget though that with Helter Skelter the Beatles went faraway from the pop/Rock sound and stretched the genre with that particular song. The opinions may differ on who started that genre, I'm only trying to find the ancestors, the founding fathers of that kind of music. About Hendrix I agree totally with you. His guitar playing was from another planet.
Greg

Athens, Greece

#139 Mar 1, 2014
Octopus wrote:
The Yardbirds, The Kinks and The Who did some heavier rock n roll that were different in their presentation. It made them who they were just like any band that was trying to be original. It was the creativity of the era, which is why the music still holds up. Since I am bored with listening to the same bands I've heard billions of times before, it is always cool to check out what lesser bands were doing in the same period also. You would be surprised. I want to be open minded and that is why I've dug into bands like The Flamin' Groovies and MC5. I like discovering older bands that may not have been household names but made great music nevertheless.
Here, we have another question:"Who started Punk Rock?". I think the MC5 and the Stooges certainly played a major role to that. I understand that if you have reached a certain age and you have been listening to Rock music, you may have been bored playing all those records again and again. You start to dig some different kind of stuff that might make you feel excited since you have heard "You really got me" for instance one million times at least!
Octopus

Albany, NY

#140 Mar 1, 2014
Greg wrote:
<quoted text>In my point of view, Dave Davies and his passion with the distorted guitar sound did contribute to it as well as the Sonics' Andy or Larry Parypa(I don't remember who was the lead guitarist of the band). I don't claim that everything had the Beatles as starters unless there is a proof about it. Let's don't forget though that with Helter Skelter the Beatles went faraway from the pop/Rock sound and stretched the genre with that particular song. The opinions may differ on who started that genre, I'm only trying to find the ancestors, the founding fathers of that kind of music. About Hendrix I agree totally with you. His guitar playing was from another planet.
Check out Eddie Cochran's instrumental studio jams, "Eddie's Blues" or "Chicken Shot Blues"

I wouldn't know if chicken pickin' style guitar playing is really distortion, but it is definitely rock.

I believe both songs are still on You Tube.

Eddie was only 22 years old when he died but he was playing all the time. He was like an earlier version of Stevie Ray Vaughan. Had he lived, he would've been one of the greats. People rarely give him credit for his fantastic rock n roll. Check out Eddie's "Milk Cow Blues" especially the live BBC version. Both Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent were touring England in the late fifties because the demand for rock n roll was stronger there than in the states.
Greg

Athens, Greece

#141 Mar 1, 2014
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
Check out Eddie Cochran's instrumental studio jams, "Eddie's Blues" or "Chicken Shot Blues"
I wouldn't know if chicken pickin' style guitar playing is really distortion, but it is definitely rock.
I believe both songs are still on You Tube.
Eddie was only 22 years old when he died but he was playing all the time. He was like an earlier version of Stevie Ray Vaughan. Had he lived, he would've been one of the greats. People rarely give him credit for his fantastic rock n roll. Check out Eddie's "Milk Cow Blues" especially the live BBC version. Both Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent were touring England in the late fifties because the demand for rock n roll was stronger there than in the states.
Thanks. You know, I am aware of Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent. And they both infulenced the Fabs. I didn't know "Chicken Shot Blues", I will search for it. Oh well, the grass is always greener on the other side. What matters is the music.
Octopus

Albany, NY

#142 Mar 1, 2014
Greg wrote:
<quoted text>Here, we have another question:"Who started Punk Rock?". I think the MC5 and the Stooges certainly played a major role to that. I understand that if you have reached a certain age and you have been listening to Rock music, you may have been bored playing all those records again and again. You start to dig some different kind of stuff that might make you feel excited since you have heard "You really got me" for instance one million times at least!
Rockabilly is a form of early Punk.

Blasts of noise and energy that was originally a mixture of country and blues, speeded up then slowed down. It was anything the artist wanted it to be. It was born from pure emotional impact of creating something new from something old. Early punk stripped it back down to basics because rock was becoming too bloated that it lost all of its original power.

Rockabilly and early rock n roll is truly the seeds of where everything begun. The Sun recordings and the artists that first created music there.
Greg

Athens, Greece

#143 Mar 1, 2014
To tell you the truth, I always consider all of them as Rock and Roll which became heavier and dirtier. We have a tree and the branches.
Octopus

Albany, NY

#144 Mar 1, 2014
Greg wrote:
<quoted text>Thanks. You know, I am aware of Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent. And they both infulenced the Fabs. I didn't know "Chicken Shot Blues", I will search for it. Oh well, the grass is always greener on the other side. What matters is the music.
It was the domino effect of everything that came before and the exchange of ideas to create something exciting. It really doesn't matter who started it because most musicians back then were limited by what they could release. Record companies only cared about possible hit records so the artist had no choice but to water it down for mass exposure. Nevertheless, by the mid sixties, they were more open to take chances.
Octopus

Albany, NY

#145 Mar 1, 2014
Greg wrote:
To tell you the truth, I always consider all of them as Rock and Roll which became heavier and dirtier. We have a tree and the branches.
Not all early rockers wanted to became heavier as Buddy Holly proved. Instead, he desired to take his brand of rock into other directions with his studio craft of overdubbing strings and doing well crafted mellow ballads like "True Love Ways" and "Words Of Love" That was fine too but I still like the energy of harder rock. What was beautiful about rock n roll was that you could go anywhere you wanted with it because it was about various emotions within the music.
Greg

Athens, Greece

#146 Mar 2, 2014
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
Not all early rockers wanted to became heavier as Buddy Holly proved. Instead, he desired to take his brand of rock into other directions with his studio craft of overdubbing strings and doing well crafted mellow ballads like "True Love Ways" and "Words Of Love" That was fine too but I still like the energy of harder rock. What was beautiful about rock n roll was that you could go anywhere you wanted with it because it was about various emotions within the music.
The British made it heavier as early as mid sixties. And the American garage scene, I would call it "proto punk period".
Octopus

Albany, NY

#147 Mar 2, 2014
Greg wrote:
<quoted text>The British made it heavier as early as mid sixties. And the American garage scene, I would call it "proto punk period".
Early punk had always based their roots on 50's rockabilly or early rock n roll, which was shorter blasts of noise in their songs. The basically scaled down the bloated guitar solos and got to the core of what rock n roll was originally about. Take MC5's second album, "Back In The USA" for example. They started the album with a smokin' version of Little Richard's "Tutti Fruiti" The same can be said of The Flamin' Groovies early recordings in the late sixties and early seventies. I can understand why they offered something different to the teens of that era because radio only promoted certain bands while neglecting others. In the eighties, The Stray Cats were able to break free briefly because of MTV. The stuff still sounds amazing because it was never overplayed or forced down people's throats. Rock was supposed to be about rebellion and not about multi-million dollar rock stars putting out product for the masses. I do not like all punk but I can understand why it came about towards the mid seventies.
Octopus

Albany, NY

#148 Mar 2, 2014
*they basically scaled down the bloated guitar solos...
Greg

Athens, Greece

#150 Mar 3, 2014
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
Early punk had always based their roots on 50's rockabilly or early rock n roll, which was shorter blasts of noise in their songs. The basically scaled down the bloated guitar solos and got to the core of what rock n roll was originally about. Take MC5's second album, "Back In The USA" for example. They started the album with a smokin' version of Little Richard's "Tutti Fruiti" The same can be said of The Flamin' Groovies early recordings in the late sixties and early seventies. I can understand why they offered something different to the teens of that era because radio only promoted certain bands while neglecting others. In the eighties, The Stray Cats were able to break free briefly because of MTV. The stuff still sounds amazing because it was never overplayed or forced down people's throats. Rock was supposed to be about rebellion and not about multi-million dollar rock stars putting out product for the masses. I do not like all punk but I can understand why it came about towards the mid seventies.
Yes, I would say that the MC5 or the Stooges were dirtier than the Stray Cats, that's why I made my earlier statement. They took early Rock and Roll and transformed it into something even more unconventional. No need to be commercial, however they managed to be remembered as groups who recorded a different sound, based on Rockabilly as you say.
Octopus

Albany, NY

#151 Mar 3, 2014
Greg wrote:
<quoted text>Yes, I would say that the MC5 or the Stooges were dirtier than the Stray Cats, that's why I made my earlier statement. They took early Rock and Roll and transformed it into something even more unconventional. No need to be commercial, however they managed to be remembered as groups who recorded a different sound, based on Rockabilly as you say.
What The Stray Cats managed to do is introduce rockabilly into the eighties mainstream but still stay true to its roots. The eighties were really cool because all kinds of music was out there and MTV played it. Of course, Roy Orbison had made a stunning comeback right before his death. Later, Johnny Cash did the same thing. They were Sun recording artists. Jerry Lee Lewis was less successful but nevertheless, a cult movie, "Great Balls Of Fire" was made plus the great CD release, "Last Man Standing" I still believe that Sam Philips Sun Records in Memphis was an amazing historical development of spreading rock n roll to other musicians that wanted to start bands and make records. The Beatles did not start the fire but were just a part of the chain. Rock can certainly be traced to the blues and r&b but I see it as a foundation in which it could be built upon. It could evolve and change within the times.
Chris

Sterling Heights, MI

#152 Mar 3, 2014
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
What The Stray Cats managed to do is introduce rockabilly into the eighties mainstream but still stay true to its roots. The eighties were really cool because all kinds of music was out there and MTV played it. Of course, Roy Orbison had made a stunning comeback right before his death. Later, Johnny Cash did the same thing. They were Sun recording artists. Jerry Lee Lewis was less successful but nevertheless, a cult movie, "Great Balls Of Fire" was made plus the great CD release, "Last Man Standing" I still believe that Sam Philips Sun Records in Memphis was an amazing historical development of spreading rock n roll to other musicians that wanted to start bands and make records. The Beatles did not start the fire but were just a part of the chain. Rock can certainly be traced to the blues and r&b but I see it as a foundation in which it could be built upon. It could evolve and change within the times.
Octo, I beg to differ with you on you're assertion that the Beatles were just a part of the chain. Yes, the fifties rockers were the pioneers of rock n roll. But, by the early sixties, rock was not doing so well. The Beatles came along & made it exciting again. They didn't start the fire, but they definitely ignited the flames. I don't know why you can't admit, that they were more than just another rock band. They changed rock music, & what it meant to be a rock band. Plus, they influenced generation's of musicians, who came after them.
Octopus

Albany, NY

#153 Mar 3, 2014
Chris wrote:
<quoted text>Octo, I beg to differ with you on you're assertion that the Beatles were just a part of the chain. Yes, the fifties rockers were the pioneers of rock n roll. But, by the early sixties, rock was not doing so well. The Beatles came along & made it exciting again. They didn't start the fire, but they definitely ignited the flames. I don't know why you can't admit, that they were more than just another rock band. They changed rock music, & what it meant to be a rock band. Plus, they influenced generation's of musicians, who came after them.
In the United States, things were already changing by 1959 in favor of more watered down pop sounds and the recording industry were not signing up rock n roll artists. The blast was had already run its course. Instead, people like Dion, Bobby Vee, Frankie Valli And The Four Seasons were popular. Then you had the folk music boom with Bob Dylan and Peter, Paul And Mary. On the other end, The Beach Boys and Jan And Dean. By 1963, it was bound to happen that The Beatles would made an impact because the time was ripe for something different. Motown was still very popular. Because of The Beatles, other British Invasion bands were signed. It did not mean that they were all good. It was just the next big craze. Everything changes and evolves into something else. That was what the sixties were all about. It was a happening of a culture change through music, fashion and a new expression of ideas in just one decade. I wouldn't strictly give the entire credit to The Beatles. That is being unfair to Bob Dylan who was just as important. The sixties had to happen in order to progress forward.
Octopus

Albany, NY

#154 Mar 3, 2014
Disco was really popular between 1975-1978, then it quickly died in favor of arena rock and country by 1980. The culture is always changing but for some reason, the last big change was the grunge era, which started with Nirvana. Unfortunately, this current era is a dead end for music because of American Idol and The X Factor. Manufactured music that has nothing remotely to do with rock musicians. The recording industry of the past is no longer what it was. Hip hop and dance music killed anything that was once art. It was bound to happen because the younger generation remains clueless to what is real good music.
Jerry Sandusky

Dallas, PA

#155 Mar 20, 2014
Chris wrote:
<quoted text>Once again, you make yourself look like an immature idiot. And Paul Simon is not Sir Paul Simon. The title of Sir is reserved for people from Britain, who have been knighted by the queen.
Hey Chris, you wanna see my balls. we'll take a nice hot shower together. Sir Paul McCartney will also be joining me.
So come on. We'll have tons of fun together. IT'S HOT IN HERE. TAKE OFF YOUR JACKET.
I love Paul McCartney. I would love to see him naked. I can stick my winker dinker up his ass.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

The Beatles Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Keith Richards criticises The Beatles as a live... (Jul '16) 3 hr The Power Of Mast... 9
Poll Who was the most talented Beatle in your opinion? (Nov '07) 10 hr Cheng 83
Poll Wings vs. the Beatles (Jul '10) Sun Anonymous 12
News 'Black Beatles': Inside Rae Sremmurd's Unlikely... Jan 7 Four Letter Rap 2
Beatles cover song: Oh Darling! Jan 4 Mikeonthemoon 1
News Good memories for Badfinger's Joey Molland (Oct '10) Jan 1 tony briar mitchell 5
keith richards claims to have stolen most of mi... (Apr '08) Dec '16 Greg 15
More from around the web