Rejecting Skilled Workers 'National S...

Rejecting Skilled Workers 'National Suicide,' Bloomberg Says

There are 16 comments on the www.bloomberg.com story from Sep 28, 2011, titled Rejecting Skilled Workers 'National Suicide,' Bloomberg Says. In it, www.bloomberg.com reports that:

The U.S. needs to allow more visas to help the economy and should let highly skilled engineers who study in U.S. universities stay in the country, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said today in Washington .

Join the discussion below, or Read more at www.bloomberg.com.

Since: Jun 11

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#1 Sep 28, 2011
Engineers are useful people and letting them come here makes sense. But no visas for the liberal arts idiot students.

“Work hard at work worth doing.”

Since: Apr 11

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#3 Sep 29, 2011
I would think that the businesses in question should have to prove first that no qualified Americans applied for the jobs. This country has let VoTech schools fall to the wayside n favor of pushing kids into college prep courses. Unfortunately, not everybody is college material, and there are those who are adept at certan skills that would be suitable to work specific trades. VoTech educations helped those kids become skilled in various areas where there is a need of workers now. It is incumbent upon this government to push for more VoTech schools, allowing Americans a choice as far as their future careers go. Americans can and will rebuild this country with little to no help from foreign H-1B visa holders.

Since: May 11

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#4 Sep 29, 2011
I agree. When we bring intelligent, well educated workers from other countries, we not only make ourselves stronger, but make our competitors weaker.

We should gladly take doctors, engineers, scientists, nurses, and the like who want to come here.

We should especially encourage those foreign students who come here for college, and get useful degrees to stay, after they finish their education.

Since: Jul 11

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#5 Sep 29, 2011
Training your own to be skilled workers is something they seem to always overlook, why is that?

Since: May 11

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#6 Sep 29, 2011
Publius51 wrote:
Training your own to be skilled workers is something they seem to always overlook, why is that?
There just aren't enough American kids willing to take the challenging subjects required for becoming an engineer/scientist/doctor. Thermodynamics (and the like) aren't easy- you actually have to work to do well at it, unlike so many other (allegedly) college level courses where you can do well just by showing up.

Too many American kids would rather screw off in college, taking the easy subjects, then wonder why they can't get a good job after college. Why bust your ass to get a "B" in Fluid Dynamics when you can screw off and get a relatively easy "A" in modern dance/art/history/literature/( insert name of liberal arts course here)?

This isn't new, it's been a problem for many decades.

Also, this isn't the kind of stuff you can teach an unemployed 30+ year old construction worker in a government "retraining" program. The only way to get more Americans in these fields is to encourage kids to go into them- it's too late to retrain older people.
Free is free

Albuquerque, NM

#7 Sep 29, 2011
We have plenty of unemployed and underemployed Americans who *have* technical degrees. This argument that we need more 'skilled' workers is just used to deflate wages for high-skill jobs.

I've been in a position where I needed to recruit overseas for technical people; it's *quite* rare to be unable to find suitable talent within the USA. That talent can be quite expensive, but it's available.

“Work hard at work worth doing.”

Since: Apr 11

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#8 Sep 29, 2011
libertarian4321 wrote:
<quoted text>
There just aren't enough American kids willing to take the challenging subjects required for becoming an engineer/scientist/doctor. Thermodynamics (and the like) aren't easy- you actually have to work to do well at it, unlike so many other (allegedly) college level courses where you can do well just by showing up.
Too many American kids would rather screw off in college, taking the easy subjects, then wonder why they can't get a good job after college. Why bust your ass to get a "B" in Fluid Dynamics when you can screw off and get a relatively easy "A" in modern dance/art/history/literature/( insert name of liberal arts course here)?
This isn't new, it's been a problem for many decades.
Also, this isn't the kind of stuff you can teach an unemployed 30+ year old construction worker in a government "retraining" program. The only way to get more Americans in these fields is to encourage kids to go into them- it's too late to retrain older people.
Never under-estimate the resolve of an older American, who feels his/her life and the lives of his/her family depend upon him/her making drastic career changes in order to provide what they need. If that requiires re-schooling, they will pursue it. It can and does happen if one is hungry enough, and has perseverance and determination.

Since: May 11

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#9 Sep 29, 2011
teddyr4me wrote:
<quoted text>Never under-estimate the resolve of an older American, who feels his/her life and the lives of his/her family depend upon him/her making drastic career changes in order to provide what they need. If that requiires re-schooling, they will pursue it. It can and does happen if one is hungry enough, and has perseverance and determination.
If some older person decides he wants to become an engineer, and can get into an engineering school, and can pay for it, fine- have at it.

But we don't need government programs trying to convert blue collar workers who haven't cracked a book in years into engineers and scientists- it's likely to have a colossally high failure rate, and will cost billions that we don't have.

Since: May 11

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#10 Sep 29, 2011
Free is free wrote:
We have plenty of unemployed and underemployed Americans who *have* technical degrees. This argument that we need more 'skilled' workers is just used to deflate wages for high-skill jobs.
Given that I am an American engineer, I assure you that is not my intent.

I just strongly believe that we strengthen ourselves, and weaken our competition, by poaching the best and brightest from around the world.

“Work hard at work worth doing.”

Since: Apr 11

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#11 Sep 29, 2011
libertarian4321 wrote:
<quoted text>
If some older person decides he wants to become an engineer, and can get into an engineering school, and can pay for it, fine- have at it.
But we don't need government programs trying to convert blue collar workers who haven't cracked a book in years into engineers and scientists- it's likely to have a colossally high failure rate, and will cost billions that we don't have.
Like with our Pell Grants? There is so much abuse associated with these grants...and far too many who have received them never earn their diplomas, but sure had fun spending the money on everything but what it was meant for. Where do you draw the line?
Djmcs11

New York, NY

#12 Sep 29, 2011
libertarian4321 wrote:
<quoted text>
Given that I am an American engineer, I assure you that is not my intent.
I just strongly believe that we strengthen ourselves, and weaken our competition, by poaching the best and brightest from around the world.
Don't you have some posting over at huffpo to do? Libtard that you are...

Since: May 11

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#13 Sep 29, 2011
Djmcs11 wrote:
<quoted text>
Don't you have some posting over at huffpo to do? Libtard that you are...
I'm a libertarian, not a liberal.

Look it up.

They aren't the same thing. That's why the words are different- go ahead, take your time and sound the words out- see, genius, they aren't the same word.

You may want to thank me for furthering your education.

I'll give you a hint: Libertarians are extreme fiscal CONSERVATIVES, hardly the stuff that people at the Huffington Post like.

Since: May 11

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#14 Sep 29, 2011
teddyr4me wrote:
<quoted text>Like with our Pell Grants? There is so much abuse associated with these grants...and far too many who have received them never earn their diplomas, but sure had fun spending the money on everything but what it was meant for. Where do you draw the line?
Yup, the government grants are bad, but in many ways, the government loans, which are an even bigger program, are worse, because they often aren't paid back.

I hate to sound elitist, but if a student really has his shit together, he's going to find a way to pay for college without Federal grants/loans- even if he comes from a poor family. The best and brightest get scholarships. Others that aren't academically gifted enough for scholarships find ways to get educated- by working, or going into the military, or whatever.

The government grants/loans generally just support mediocre students who don't have the ambition to bust their asses to find a way to get their education.

“Work hard at work worth doing.”

Since: Apr 11

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#15 Sep 29, 2011
libertarian4321 wrote:
<quoted text>
Yup, the government grants are bad, but in many ways, the government loans, which are an even bigger program, are worse, because they often aren't paid back.
I hate to sound elitist, but if a student really has his shit together, he's going to find a way to pay for college without Federal grants/loans- even if he comes from a poor family. The best and brightest get scholarships. Others that aren't academically gifted enough for scholarships find ways to get educated- by working, or going into the military, or whatever.
The government grants/loans generally just support mediocre students who don't have the ambition to bust their asses to find a way to get their education.
Orr going into a trade that could bre learned at a VoTech. I agree, not everybody is college material, but some of these kids scraped by the skin of their teeth. A former high school principal was like that. He was lazy and a smart arse druing high school. but did want to turn his life around and get a degree. He had to learn how to study when he got to college, and he did, and graduated...why, because he cared. The man in question was the hero assistant principal at Pearl High School during the tragedy that occurred there. He later became a principal in another school system. We have to believe that our children are worth our efforts, but there needs to be other ways to jumpstart them and help them achieve their goals and make them care.

“Work hard at work worth doing.”

Since: Apr 11

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#16 Sep 29, 2011
This is the man of whom I was referring.

http://www.davekopel.com/2a/othwr/principal&a...

Regardless of how you feel about guns, the man saved lives on that day.
Free is free

Albuquerque, NM

#17 Sep 29, 2011
libertarian4321 wrote:
<quoted text>
Given that I am an American engineer, I assure you that is not my intent.
I just strongly believe that we strengthen ourselves, and weaken our competition, by poaching the best and brightest from around the world.
That's fine, if you're truly going after the cream of the crop. We need people like that in big science and other costly, difficult engineering initiatives.

Silicon Valley is a great example of *not* doing that, though. Overpopulated with average-performing H1Bs doing jobs that aren't particularly difficult and displacing other average American citizen engineers seeking employment. Companies I've worked for are constantly arguing for more H1Bs, while laying citizens off. No retraining, just cut 'em loose and import someone to do it cheaper or offshore the work.

Destroying our middle class looks great on the quarterly report, but if we manage to decimate our economy by laying everyone off, who will buy the toys that are produced by companies who need Silicon Valley's goods and services?

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