Immigrant-Owned U.S. Companies Said t...

Immigrant-Owned U.S. Companies Said to Generate $775 Billion

There are 38 comments on the Democratic Underground Latest Breaking News story from Aug 14, 2012, titled Immigrant-Owned U.S. Companies Said to Generate $775 Billion. In it, Democratic Underground Latest Breaking News reports that:

Source: Bloomberg Immigrant-owned businesses employ one in 10 U.S. workers in private companies and contribute more than $775 billion of revenue to the U.S. economy, according to the Partnership for a New American Economy.

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“The haters hate me”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#23 Aug 14, 2012
Dee Dee Dee wrote:
<quoted text>
The amazing and sad part is you actually believe that statement. Does your tin foil hat get hot in the sun?
I hope it draws lighting. On second thought, maybe it already has and we are dealing with the results.
uIdiotRacesMAkeW orldPeace

United States

#24 Aug 14, 2012
The American brain drain

Uploaded by RTAmerica on May 18, 2010

While the economy of the United States continues to shrink, India and China's economies are growing. Many highly skilled immigrants are deciding to leave the United States and heading home because of better job opportunities and advancement. Experts predict that in the next five years 500,000 Indian and 500,000 Chinese immigrants will leave the United States. How will that impact the American economy? Chinese and Indians entrepreneurship have produced thousands of jobs in the United States and created major centers of technological innovation like Silicon Valley and Google.
Watch
&fe ature=player_detailpage
uIdiotRacesMAkeW orldPeace

United States

#25 Aug 14, 2012
http://www.businessweek.com/technology/conten...

Why Skilled Immigrants Are Leaving the U.S.
By Vivek Wadhwa on March 01, 2009
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By Vivek Wadhwa


As the debate over H-1B workers and skilled immigrants intensifies, we are losing sight of one important fact: The U.S. is no longer the only land of opportunity. If we don't want the immigrants who have fueled our innovation and economic growth, they now have options elsewhere. Immigrants are returning home in greater numbers. And new research shows they are returning to enjoy a better quality of life, better career prospects, and the comfort of being close to family and friends.

Earlier research by my team suggested that a crisis was brewing because of a burgeoning immigration backlog. At the end of 2006, more than 1 million skilled professionals (engineers, scientists, doctors, researchers) and their families were in line for a yearly allotment of only 120,000 permanent resident visas. The wait time for some people ran longer than a decade. In the meantime, these workers were trapped in "immigration limbo." If they changed jobs or even took a promotion, they risked being pushed to the back of the permanent residency queue. We predicted that skilled foreign workers would increasingly get fed up and return to countries like India and China where the economies were booming.

Why should we care? Because immigrants are critical to the country's long-term economic health. Despite the fact that they constitute only 12% of the U.S. population, immigrants have started 52% of Silicon Valley's technology companies and contributed to more than 25% of our global patents. They make up 24% of the U.S. science and engineering workforce holding bachelor's degrees and 47% of science and engineering workers who have PhDs. Immigrants have co-founded firms such as Google (GOOG), Intel (INTC), eBay (EBAY), and Yahoo!(YHOO).
Who Are They? Young and Well-Educated

We tried to find hard data on how many immigrants had returned to India and China. No government authority seems to track these numbers. But human resources directors in India and China told us that what was a trickle of returnees a decade ago had become a flood. Job applications from the U.S. had increased tenfold over the last few years, they said. To get an understanding of how the returnees had fared and why they left the U.S., my team at Duke, along with AnnaLee Saxenian of the University of California at Berkeley and Richard Freeman of Harvard University, conducted a survey. Through professional networking site LinkedIn, we tracked down 1,203 Indian and Chinese immigrants who had worked or received education in the U.S. and had returned to their home countries. This research was funded by the Kauffman Foundation.

Our new paper, "America's Loss Is the World's Gain," finds that the vast majority of these returnees were relatively young. The average age was 30 for Indian returnees, and 33 for Chinese. They were highly educated, with degrees in management, technology, or science. Fifty-one percent of the Chinese held master's degrees and 41% had PhDs. Sixty-six percent of the Indians held a master's and 12.1% had PhDs. They were at very top of the educational distribution for these highly educated immigrant groups—precisely the kind of people who make the greatest contribution to the U.S. economy and to business and job growth.

Nearly a third of the Chinese returnees and a fifth of the Indians came to the U.S. on student visas. A fifth of the Chinese and nearly half of the Indians entered on temporary work visas (such as the H-1B). The strongest factor that brought them to the U.S. was professional and educational development opportunities.
uIdiotRacesMAkeW orldPeace

Jackson Heights, NY

#26 Aug 14, 2012
What They Miss: Family and Friends

They found life in the U.S. had many drawbacks. Returnees cited language barriers, missing their family and friends at home, difficulty with cultural assimilation, and care of parents and children as key issues. About a third of the Indians and a fifth of the Chinese said that visas were a strong factor in their decision to return home, but others left for opportunity and to be close to family and friends. And it wasn't just new immigrants who were returning. In fact, 30% of respondents held permanent resident status or were U.S. citizens.

Eighty-seven percent of Chinese and 79% of Indians said a strong factor in their original decision to return home was the growing demand for their skills in their home countries. Their instincts generally proved right. Significant numbers moved up the organization chart. Among Indians the percentage of respondents holding senior management positions increased from 10% in the U.S. to 44% in India, and among Chinese it increased from 9% in the U.S. to 36% in China. Eighty-seven percent of Chinese and 62% of Indians said they had better opportunities for longer-term professional growth in their home countries than in the U.S. Additionally, nearly half were considering launching businesses and said entrepreneurial opportunities were better in their home countries than in the U.S.

Friends and family played an equally strong role for 88% of Indians and 77% of Chinese. Care for aging parents was considered by 89% of Indians and 79% of Chinese to be much better in their home countries. Nearly 80% of Indians and 67% of Chinese said family values were better in their home countries.
More Options Back Home

Immigrants who have arrived at America's shores have always felt lonely and homesick. They had to make big personal sacrifices to provide their children with better opportunities than they had. But they never have had the option to return home. Now they do, and they are leaving.

It isn't all rosy back home. Indians complained of traffic and congestion, lack of infrastructure, excessive bureaucracy, and pollution. Chinese complained of pollution, reverse culture shock, inferior education for children, frustration with government bureaucracy, and the quality of health care. Returnees said they were generally making less money in absolute terms, but they also said they enjoyed a higher quality of life.

We may not need all these workers in the U.S. during the deepening recession. But we will need them to help us recover from it. Right now, they are taking their skills and ideas back to their home countries and are unlikely to return, barring an extraordinary recruitment effort and major changes to immigration policy. That hardly seems likely given the current political climate. The policy focus now seems to be on doing whatever it takes to retain existing American jobs—even if it comes at the cost of building a workforce for the future of America.

Wadhwa is senior research associate at the Labor & Worklife Program at Harvard Law School and executive in residence at Duke University. He is an entrepreneur who founded two technology companies. His research can be found at www.globalizationresearch.com .
uIdiotRacesMAkeW orldPeace

United States

#27 Aug 14, 2012
In Mexico, U.S. and Canada, Public Support for NAFTA Surprisingly Strong, Given each Country Sees Grass as Greener on the Other Side
January 23, 2006

By Stephen J. Weber

More than a decade after the North American Free Trade Agreement entered into force, public opinion across North America shows moderate to strong support for NAFTA, even though the Mexican, U.S. and Canadian publics each feel that their trading partners have done better than their own countries under the agreement and that some of their fellow citizens are harmed by freer trade. The political challenges of trade agreements are evident in these mixed feelings.

NAFTA entered into force in 1994, creating one of the world�s largest free trade blocs. An even more ambitious regional trade pact�the Free Trade Area of the Americas�has been on the hemispheric agenda since 1994 and was intended to be in place by 2005, but President Bush returned from the Summit of the Americas in Argentina in November 2005 with little movement toward an agreement. Opinion polling on NAFTA reveals the complex public reactions to liberalizing trade: majority support for freer trade but reservations about fairness between countries and about trade�s impact on groups within their society.

http://www.worldpublicopinion.org/pipa/articl...
uIdiotRacesMAkeW orldPeace

United States

#28 Aug 14, 2012
bwhahhhahhhahaA mwhahahhahahahaA hah!
uIdiotRacesMAkeW orldPeace

United States

#29 Aug 14, 2012
oUR aMERICAN BRAIN DRAIN IS ON THE MOVE,, THAT FOR SURE!

wAKE UP TIME U DUMBAZZES....
Adventure Time

Los Angeles, CA

#30 Aug 14, 2012
Dee Dee Dee wrote:
<quoted text>
The amazing and sad part is you actually believe that statement. Does your tin foil hat get hot in the sun?
You actually believe that American companies are doing their best to stimulate the US economy? Had that been the case, we'd not be in the recession so long.

Haven't you heard of the term jobless recovery?

That's what your American companies are doing.

They're not investing in American workers, they're not stimulating the US economy the way they should be.

So maybe you need to take that tinfoil hat off and lay off the weed.
Adventure Time

Los Angeles, CA

#31 Aug 14, 2012
centerline wrote:
<quoted text>
Why, it wouldn't be used and Obama would defund.
The executive branch of government cannot defund a program, that's reserved for the House of Representatives. That's known as the power of the purse so the next time you want to attack Obama, make sure you know what you're talking about or else I'll pick on you.
Adventure Time

Los Angeles, CA

#32 Aug 14, 2012
uIdiotRacesMAkeWorldPeace wrote:
oUR aMERICAN BRAIN DRAIN IS ON THE MOVE,, THAT FOR SURE!
wAKE UP TIME U DUMBAZZES....
Too late, these sheep are in the slaughterhouse.

Since: Aug 12

Birmingham, AL

#33 Aug 14, 2012
Hundreds of thousands of young undocumented immigrants across the country -- about 15,000 in the El Paso area -- will be able to start applying this week for protection from deportation and work permits under a new initiative from the Obama administration.
obama is enforcing illegal immigration,he reminds me of a person who burns down a building,and then starts accusing people standing around.

“The haters hate me”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#34 Aug 14, 2012
uIdiotRacesMAkeWorldPeace wrote:
The American brain drain
Uploaded by RTAmerica on May 18, 2010
While the economy of the United States continues to shrink, India and China's economies are growing. Many highly skilled immigrants are deciding to leave the United States and heading home because of better job opportunities and advancement. Experts predict that in the next five years 500,000 Indian and 500,000 Chinese immigrants will leave the United States. How will that impact the American economy? Chinese and Indians entrepreneurship have produced thousands of jobs in the United States and created major centers of technological innovation like Silicon Valley and Google.
Watch
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =MMizz7OJy6IXX&feature=pla yer_detailpage
The only people here that are crying about it are the employers that were using them at half price.

By the way, the vast majority of them weren't "immigrants" at all, they were here solely for temporary work on a visa as a foreigner. It’s just another case of dishonest reporting.

Citizen and other legal immigrants and visa holders will fill the spots, no problem.

“The haters hate me”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#35 Aug 14, 2012
uIdiotRacesMAkeWorldPeace wrote:
http://www.businessweek.com/te chnology/content/feb2009/tc200 90228_990934.htm
Why Skilled Immigrants Are Leaving the U.S.
By Vivek Wadhwa on March 01, 2009
Tweet
Facebook
LinkedIn
Google Plus
0 Comments
By Vivek Wadhwa
As the debate over H-1B workers and skilled immigrants intensifies, we are losing sight of one important fact: The U.S. is no longer the only land of opportunity. If we don't want the immigrants who have fueled our innovation and economic growth, they now have options elsewhere. Immigrants are returning home in greater numbers. And new research shows they are returning to enjoy a better quality of life, better career prospects, and the comfort of being close to family and friends.
Earlier research by my team suggested that a crisis was brewing because of a burgeoning immigration backlog. At the end of 2006, more than 1 million skilled professionals (engineers, scientists, doctors, researchers) and their families were in line for a yearly allotment of only 120,000 permanent resident visas. The wait time for some people ran longer than a decade. In the meantime, these workers were trapped in "immigration limbo." If they changed jobs or even took a promotion, they risked being pushed to the back of the permanent residency queue. We predicted that skilled foreign workers would increasingly get fed up and return to countries like India and China where the economies were booming.
Why should we care? Because immigrants are critical to the country's long-term economic health. Despite the fact that they constitute only 12% of the U.S. population, immigrants have started 52% of Silicon Valley's technology companies and contributed to more than 25% of our global patents. They make up 24% of the U.S. science and engineering workforce holding bachelor's degrees and 47% of science and engineering workers who have PhDs. Immigrants have co-founded firms such as Google (GOOG), Intel (INTC), eBay (EBAY), and Yahoo!(YHOO).
Who Are They? Young and Well-Educated
We tried to find hard data on how many immigrants had returned to India and China. No government authority seems to track these numbers. But human resources directors in India and China told us that what was a trickle of returnees a decade ago had become a flood. Job applications from the U.S. had increased tenfold over the last few years, they said. To get an understanding of how the returnees had fared and why they left the U.S., my team at Duke, along with AnnaLee Saxenian of the University of California at Berkeley and Richard Freeman of Harvard University, conducted a survey. Through professional networking site LinkedIn, we tracked down 1,203 Indian and Chinese immigrants who had worked or received education in the U.S. and had returned to their home countries. This research was funded by the Kauffman Foundation.
Our new paper, "America's Loss Is the World's Gain," finds that the vast majority of these returnees were relatively young. The average age was 30 for Indian returnees, and 33 for Chinese. They were highly educated, with degrees in management, technology, or science. Fifty-one percent of the Chinese held master's degrees and 41% had PhDs. Sixty-six percent of the Indians held a master's and 12.1% had PhDs. They were at very top of the educational distribution for these highly educated immigrant groups—precisely the kind of people who make the greatest contribution to the U.S. economy and to business and job growth.
Nearly a third of the Chinese returnees and a fifth of the Indians came to the U.S. on student visas. A fifth of the Chinese and nearly half of the Indians entered on temporary work visas (such as the H-1B). The strongest factor that brought them to the U.S. was professional and educational development opportunities.
“As the debate over H-1B workers and skilled immigrants intensifies”

Once again dishonest reporting, H-1B workers are “non-immigrants”
http://www.murthy.com/worker/h1b-visa-status/

“The haters hate me”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#36 Aug 14, 2012
uIdiotRacesMAkeWorldPeace wrote:
What They Miss: Family and Friends
They found life in the U.S. had many drawbacks. Returnees cited language barriers, missing their family and friends at home, difficulty with cultural assimilation, and care of parents and children as key issues. About a third of the Indians and a fifth of the Chinese said that visas were a strong factor in their decision to return home, but others left for opportunity and to be close to family and friends. And it wasn't just new immigrants who were returning. In fact, 30% of respondents held permanent resident status or were U.S. citizens.
Eighty-seven percent of Chinese and 79% of Indians said a strong factor in their original decision to return home was the growing demand for their skills in their home countries. Their instincts generally proved right. Significant numbers moved up the organization chart. Among Indians the percentage of respondents holding senior management positions increased from 10% in the U.S. to 44% in India, and among Chinese it increased from 9% in the U.S. to 36% in China. Eighty-seven percent of Chinese and 62% of Indians said they had better opportunities for longer-term professional growth in their home countries than in the U.S. Additionally, nearly half were considering launching businesses and said entrepreneurial opportunities were better in their home countries than in the U.S.
Friends and family played an equally strong role for 88% of Indians and 77% of Chinese. Care for aging parents was considered by 89% of Indians and 79% of Chinese to be much better in their home countries. Nearly 80% of Indians and 67% of Chinese said family values were better in their home countries.
More Options Back Home
Immigrants who have arrived at America's shores have always felt lonely and homesick. They had to make big personal sacrifices to provide their children with better opportunities than they had. But they never have had the option to return home. Now they do, and they are leaving.
It isn't all rosy back home. Indians complained of traffic and congestion, lack of infrastructure, excessive bureaucracy, and pollution. Chinese complained of pollution, reverse culture shock, inferior education for children, frustration with government bureaucracy, and the quality of health care. Returnees said they were generally making less money in absolute terms, but they also said they enjoyed a higher quality of life.
We may not need all these workers in the U.S. during the deepening recession. But we will need them to help us recover from it. Right now, they are taking their skills and ideas back to their home countries and are unlikely to return, barring an extraordinary recruitment effort and major changes to immigration policy. That hardly seems likely given the current political climate. The policy focus now seems to be on doing whatever it takes to retain existing American jobs—even if it comes at the cost of building a workforce for the future of America.
Wadhwa is senior research associate at the Labor & Worklife Program at Harvard Law School and executive in residence at Duke University. He is an entrepreneur who founded two technology companies. His research can be found at www.globalizationresearch.com .
They are free to leave, provided they have served all jail time they may have earned first.

“The haters hate me”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#37 Aug 14, 2012
uIdiotRacesMAkeWorldPeace wrote:
In Mexico, U.S. and Canada, Public Support for NAFTA Surprisingly Strong, Given each Country Sees Grass as Greener on the Other Side
January 23, 2006
By Stephen J. Weber
More than a decade after the North American Free Trade Agreement entered into force, public opinion across North America shows moderate to strong support for NAFTA, even though the Mexican, U.S. and Canadian publics each feel that their trading partners have done better than their own countries under the agreement and that some of their fellow citizens are harmed by freer trade. The political challenges of trade agreements are evident in these mixed feelings.
NAFTA entered into force in 1994, creating one of the world�s largest free trade blocs. An even more ambitious regional trade pact�the Free Trade Area of the Americas�has been on the hemispheric agenda since 1994 and was intended to be in place by 2005, but President Bush returned from the Summit of the Americas in Argentina in November 2005 with little movement toward an agreement. Opinion polling on NAFTA reveals the complex public reactions to liberalizing trade: majority support for freer trade but reservations about fairness between countries and about trade�s impact on groups within their society.
http://www.worldpublicopinion.org/pipa/articl...
" WorldPublicOpinion.org

WorldPublicOpinion.org is an international collaborative project whose aim is to give voice to public opinion around the world on international issues. As the world becomes increasingly integrated, problems have become increasingly global, pointing to a greater need for understanding between nations and for elucidating global norms. With the growth of democracy in the world, public opinion has come to play a greater role in the foreign policy process. WorldPublicOpinion.org seeks to reveal the values and views of publics in specific nations around the world as well as global patterns of world public opinion.

WorldPublicOpinion.org was initiated by and is managed by the Program on International Policy Attitudes."
http://www.worldpublicopinion.org/pipa/about....
A seriously bias source.

“The haters hate me”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#38 Aug 14, 2012
uIdiotRacesMAkeWorldPeace wrote:
bwhahhhahhhahaA mwhahahhahahahaA hah!
Not one stuck. HahahaHAHAhaha!!!!

“The haters hate me”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#39 Aug 14, 2012
Adventure Time wrote:
<quoted text>
The executive branch of government cannot defund a program, that's reserved for the House of Representatives. That's known as the power of the purse so the next time you want to attack Obama, make sure you know what you're talking about or else I'll pick on you.
The Executive Branch HAS just ordered our law enforncement not to enforce our laws. Starts tomorrow.

“The haters hate me”

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#40 Aug 14, 2012
Adventure Time wrote:
<quoted text>
You actually believe that American companies are doing their best to stimulate the US economy? Had that been the case, we'd not be in the recession so long.
Haven't you heard of the term jobless recovery?
That's what your American companies are doing.
They're not investing in American workers, they're not stimulating the US economy the way they should be.
So maybe you need to take that tinfoil hat off and lay off the weed.
"they're not stimulating the US economy the way they should be."

Can you link any laws that state how they "should be"?

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