Navy supply ships set to join F-35 as...

Navy supply ships set to join F-35 as political lightning rod in 2013

There are 4 comments on the The Guelph Mercury story from Jan 6, 2013, titled Navy supply ships set to join F-35 as political lightning rod in 2013. In it, The Guelph Mercury reports that:

The navy's long-delayed, much-studied joint support ship program is expected to come under the political microscope within weeks in what is likely another defence equipment embarrassment for the Harper government.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Guelph Mercury.

SHYKORA paul ARTs

Calgary, Canada

#1 Jan 6, 2013
..well..WE DO Have ...AMERICA,here....
Anne

Mississauga, Canada

#2 Jan 6, 2013

“Seriously guys...”

Since: May 12

Regina

#3 Jan 6, 2013
Wow, this is almost an exact repeat of the armed icebreakers that got whittled down to un-armed slush pushers.
Only the Canadian govt would build an icebreaker that will not be effective year round.

When it comes to planes they want Cadillacs when Corvettes will do the job just fine. But when it comes to Arctic patrol and supply ships, they think Chevettes when THAT'S where we could use a few Cadillacs.

And the REALLY sad part is the helicopters that Mulroney wanted to replace with the EH-101 are STILL being flown by the CF today after the Cretin cancelled the -101 contract.
They long ceased to be helicopters, they're crashes waiting to happen.

The way our govt supplies our military is so bush league they'd need a decade of practice just to reach amateur hour status.
I don't expect trillions in spending but for God's sake, give our military the ESSENTIAL tools they need at least.
budget conscious

Burnaby, Canada

#4 Jan 13, 2013
From defenseindustrydaily.com
If Canada is forced away from its commitment to the F-35, cost will play a large role. Handicapping for any prospective replacement needs to reflect that.

The strongest competitor would be Boeing, with its F/A-18E/F Super Hornet family. Its F-15E Strike Eagle family is arguably a far better fit for Canada’s military needs, but the Super Hornet is significantly cheaper at about USD$ 60 million flyaway cost, and offers perceived continuity with the existing CF-18 fleet. A Super Hornet buy also offers long-term commonality with the US Navy, ensuring that upgrades and improvements will be financed outside of Canada. Australia now flies the Super Hornet, and a 3rd option would be for Canada to take a leaf from their playbook, buying a mix of Super Hornets plus a smaller number of F-35As. Australia is about to take the next step in their approach, and fit out 12 of its Super Hornets as EA-18G electronic attack aircraft. That capability is unique to the Super Hornet platform, available to Canada, and will always be in demand among international coalition partners.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Paul Martin Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News 'An architectural gem': Liberals seeking ideas ... Aug '16 TRUMPs STUMP 1
News What you need to know about Michael Chong (May '16) May '16 lots he never tel... 1
News National daycare proposal to be ready by summer... (May '16) May '16 GTA 1
News Mourners gather in Montreal to remember Jean La... (Apr '16) Apr '16 HA shot 1
News A new way to interview the prime minister: Pete... (Jan '16) Jan '16 tricky mayors nee... 1
News Condolences offered to family of former Manitob... (Jan '16) Jan '16 Don Peat Byline 1
News Back to normal': Former prime ministers reflect... (Dec '15) Dec '15 Steven Harpo - Loser 4
More from around the web