Native American Legends, Folklore, Quotes and Prayers

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“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#1 Jun 2, 2008
This forum is for posting your favorite stories that have either been passed down or just one you've found you like.
For so long, and still to some degree, the only way the Native's past was carried on was to pass it on orally. So much of this is in written word now but not all of it. Don't feel you have to share personal stories, that's understood, those sometimes are for the inner circle of your clan or close family. I just thought it would be fun and educational to make a record of them and to discuss them as well.
Also, if you run across a story, quote, prayers that you really like or if you have something special you've always enjoyed, here's a great place to share it.

Since: May 07

United States

#2 Jun 3, 2008
Cherokee Bear Legend:

In the long ago time, there was a Cherokee Clan call the Ani-Tsa-gu-hi (Ahnee-Jah-goo-hee), and in one family of this clan was a boy who used to leave home and be gone all day in the mountains. After a while he went oftener and stayed longer, until at last he would not eat in the house at all, but started off at daybreak and did not come back until night. His parents scolded, but that did no good, and the boy still went every day until they noticed that long brown hair was beginning to grow out all over his body. Then they wondered and asked him why it was that he wanted to be so much in the woods that he would not even eat at home. Said the boy, "I find plenty to eat there, and it is better than the corn and beans we have in the settlements, and pretty soon I am going into the woods to stay all the time." His parents were worried and begged him not leave them, but he said, "It is better there than here, and you see I am beginning to be different already, so that I can not live here any longer. If you will come with me, there is plenty for all of us and you will never have to work for it; but if you want to come, you must first fast seven days."

The father and mother talked it over and then told the headmen of the clan. They held a council about the matter and after everything had been said they decided: "Here we must work hard and have not always enough. There he says is always plenty without work. We will go with him." So they fasted seven days, and on the seventh morning al the Ani-Tsa-gu-hi left the settlement and started for the mountains as the boy led the way.

When the people of the other towns heard of it they were very sorry and sent their headmen to persuade the Ani Tsaguhi to stay at home and not go into the woods to live. The messengers found them already on the way, and were surprised to notice that their bodies were beginning to be covered with hair like that of animals, because for seven days they had not taken human food and their nature was changing. The Ani Tsaguhi would not come back, but said, "We are going where there is always plenty to eat. Hereafter we shall be called Yonv(a)(bears), and when you yourselves are hungry come into the woods and call us and we shall shall come to give you our own flesh. You need not be afraid to kill us, for we shall live always." Then they taught the messengers the songs with which to call them and bear hunters have these songs still. When they had finished the songs, the Ani Tsaguhi started on again and the messengers turned back to the settlements, but after going a little way they looked back and saw a drove of bears going into the woods.

Aho! We are all Related!

(source: http://www.indians.org/welker/cherbear.htm )

Since: May 07

United States

#3 Jun 3, 2008
The Cherokee Legend Of The Sacred Pipe
Story told By: Dancing Heart Rising
Many stories have been told about the 'Sacred Pipe'. The Whites refer to it as The Peace Pipe, but persons of Indian descent know it as a sacred item having a special place in Indian cultures. The pipe, in one form or another, has come to most cultures around the world. Every society has used the pipe in one way or another.
Our Lakota brothers tell the story of the White Buffalo woman and how she first brought the pipe to the Red man. What is important is not how the pipe first arrived or who it came to first. What is important is that the pipe is revered as a sacred item and also important is that it did come from The Creator. What is most important is that the pipe was brought to all men of this world, for we all must share this world.
This is the story of how the pipe first came to the Southern Cherokee. If you know any differences in this story that is because it was told to me this way:
Long ago, but not long after the world was new, a tribe of red skinned people came to live on the lands which are around The Blue Smoke Mountains. At this time, the animals of the world still talked to men and taught them how to live on and care for the land. These people were called "Ani Yun Wiya" or the One True People. In this tribe lived a brave warrior woman. She was called 'Arrow Woman'. Arrow Woman was taught to use the bow, the spear and the knife. Even though it was a man's job to hunt and fight, Arrow Woman could shoot straighter with the bow than any man, she could throw the knife so as split a branch no bigger than your thumb and she could throw the spear into eye of a hawk in flight. Because of all this, no man would tell her to be like a woman.
One day while on a hunt, Arrow Woman came upon the tracks of Yona the bear. She saw blood on the ground and knew him to be wounded so she followed his tracks. High into the mountains she followed. Soon she came to a place that she did not know. It was in this place, a place known only to the animals that she finally saw Yona the bear. He had a deep cut in his side and she saw him bowing down in prayer. She saw him bowing toward a large field of tall grass and speaking words that she had not heard before. Suddenly, the grass shimmered and became a lake. Arrow Woman saw Yona dive into the water. After a time he emerged from the water, his side was completely healed. Yona then saw Arrow Woman and walked to her.
Yona told her, "this is the sacred lake of the animals. It is called,'Atagahi' and it's location is known only to the animals. It is where we come for healing and strength. You are the first man creature to see the sacred lake. You must never tell your kind of it's location for it is the home of 'The Great Uktena'. With these words Yona the Bear turned and walked into the woods and disappeared.
Arrow Woman was tired after following Yona all day so she decided to rest a while by this lake. She built a small fire and sat down to eat a meal that she had brought with her. She took a drink of the water from the lake and felt instantly refreshed. She was amazed, she felt strong as Yan'si the Buffalo. She felt as if she run faster than Coga the Raven could fly.
The woods were quiet, Unole the wind was sleeping, Nvda the sun was shinning bright but was not hot, the surface of the lake was completely calm, Arrow Woman began to get sleepy. It was at this time that she saw 'Uktena', she had been told of him when she was a child but no one in her tribe ever claimed to have seen him.

(continued next post)

Since: May 07

United States

#4 Jun 3, 2008
High above the water he raised his great serpent's head, the jewel in his forehead glistening. He began to move toward her. Arrow Woman grabbed up her spear and stood up to face the great creature coming to her, standing proud, showing no fear, the way any warrior should. She raised her spear and prepared to strike the huge beast.
Uktena stopped a short distance from her. He smiled, his mouth was larger than a man was tall and full of teeth longer than man's forearm. He spoke to the brave woman on the bank of his lake. To her he said, "Put down your weapons for I mean you no harm.
I come only to teach."
Arrow Woman laid down her spear and began to relax, somehow knowing Uktena spoke truly.
Uktena told her to sit and to listen. Uktena dipped his head below the surface and came back up a moment later. In his mouth he had a strangely crooked stick and a leather pouch. These things he laid on the ground in front of Arrow Woman.
Then the Great Uktena began to teach. He said, "This that I have laid before you is the Sacred Pipe of The Creator." He then told her to pick up the pipe. "The bowl is of the same red clay The Creator used to make your kind. The red clay is Woman kind and is from the Earth. Just as a woman bears the children and brings forth life, the bowl bears the sacred tobacco (tsula) and brings forth smoke. The stem is Man. Rigid and strong the stem is from the plant kingdom and like a man it supports the bowl just as man supports his family."
Uktena then showed Arrow Woman how to join the bowl to the stem saying, "Just as a man and a woman remain separate until joined in marriage so too are the bowl and stem separate. Never to be joined unless the pipe is used."
Uktena then showed her how place the sacred tsula into the pipe and with an ember from the fire lit the tsula so it burned slightly. He told her this, "The smoke is the breath of The Creator, When you draw the smoke in into your body, you will be cleansed and made whole. When the smoke leaves your mouth, it will rise to The Creator. Your prayers, your dreams, your hopes and desires will be taken to Him in the smoke. Also the truth in your soul will be shown to Him when you smoke the pipe. If you are not true, do not smoke the pipe. If your spirit is bad and you seek to deceive, do not smoke the pipe." Uktena continued his lesson well into the night teaching Arrow Woman all of the prayers used with the pipe and all of the reasons for using the pipe. He finished just as the moon was beginning her nightly journey across the sky in search of her true love. He told Arrow Woman to wrap the pipe in red cloth, keeping the parts separate.
With this done He told her that she would never again be able to find this place but to remember all that she had learned.

(continued next post)

Since: May 07

United States

#5 Jun 3, 2008
Uktena then returned to depths of the lake. Arrow Woman saw the water shimmer and become again the field of grass. She left, taking with her the pipe and her lessons and a wondrous tale.
Ever since that time, The Ani Yun Wiya have used the sacred pipe and never again has any man seen the sacred lake of Uktena.
The pipe is not a symbol of things that are sacred. The pipe itself is sacred. Not everyone is called upon to be a pipe bearer. The person who carries the pipe and practices the pipe ceremonies and traditions has a great responsibility to his brothers and sisters, his land and country and even to the Earth Mother.
The pipe bearer does not 'own' the pipe he carries. He simply carries the pipe until the time comes for him to pass it to the next bearer. The pipe bearer is given certain powers of sight from the pipe as well as an ability to heal and purify. Should the bearer fall from grace and become a liar or thief or become deceitful, the pipe would repossess these gifts and then the possibility of misfortune for the former bearer may exist.
One should be ready to accept the responsibility of the pipe for it may make demands upon you. It will become your teacher and guide. It can also be your worst enemy if used wrongly.
I leave it to you to decide if these words are truly said. This is the way that I have learned. See you on the medicine path.

(source: http://www.birdclan.org/pipe.htm )

“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#6 Jun 4, 2008
Chinsy, you know this is my fav. so here goes.

The Legend of the Cherokee Rose

Retold by Barbara Shining Woman Warren

In the latter half of 1838, Cherokee People who had not voluntarily moved west earlier were forced to leave their homes in the East.

The trail to the West was long and treacherous and many were dying along the way. The People's hearts were heavy with sadness and their tears mingled with the dust of the trail.

The Elders knew that the survival of the children depended upon the strength of the women. One evening around the campfire, the Elders called upon Heaven Dweller, ga lv la di e hi. They told Him of the People's suffering and tears. They were afraid the children would not survive to rebuild the Cherokee Nation.

Gal v la di e hi spoke to them, "To let you know how much I care, I will give you a sign. In the morning, tell the women to look back along the trail. Where their tears have fallen, I will cause to grow a plant that will have seven leaves for the seven clans of the Cherokee. Amidst the plant will be a delicate white rose with five petals. In the center of the blossom will be a pile of gold to remind the Cherokee of the white man's greed for the gold found on the Cherokee homeland. This plant will be sturdy and strong with stickers on all the stems. It will defy anything which tries to destroy it."

The next morning the Elders told the women to look back down the trail. A plant was growing fast and covering the trail where they had walked. As the women watched, blossoms formed and slowly opened. They forgot their sadness. Like the plant the women began to feel strong and beautiful. As the plant protected its blossoms, they knew they would have the courage and determination to protect their children who would begin a new Nation in the West.

“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#7 Jun 14, 2008
This is long but good.

The Hunting of the Great Bear

There were four hunters who were brothers. No hunters were as good as they at following a trail. They never gave up once they began tracking their quarry.
One day, in the moon when the cold nights return, an urgent message came to the village of the four hunters. A great bear, one so large and powerful that many thought it must be some kind of monster, had appeared. The people of the village whose hunting grounds the monster had invaded were afraid. The children no longer went out to play in the woods. The long houses of the village were guarded each night by men with weapons, who stood by the entrances.

Each morning, when the people went outside, they found the huge tracks of the bear in the midst of their village. They knew that soon it would become even bolder.

Picking up their spears and calling to their small dog, the four hunters set forth for that village, which was not far away. As they came closer they noticed how quiet the woods were. There were no signs of rabbits or deer and even the birds were silent. On a great pine tree they found the scars where the great bear had reared up on hind legs and made deep scratches to mark its territory. The tallest of the brothers tried to touch the highest of the scratch marks with the tip of his spear. "It is as the people feared," the first brother said. "This one we are to hunt is Nyah-gwaheh, a monster bear."

"But what about the magic that the Nyah-gwaheh has?" said the second brother.

The first brother shook his head. "That magic will do it no good if we find its track."

"That's so," said the third brother. "I have always heard that from the old people. Those creatures can only chase a hunter who has not yet found its trail. When you find the track of the Nyah-gwaheh and begin to chase it, then it must run from you."

"Brothers," said the fourth hunter who was the fattest and laziest, "did we bring along enough food to eat? It may take a long time to catch this big bear. I'm feeling hungry."

Before long, the four hunters and their small dog reached the village. It was a sad sight to see. There was no fire burning in the centre of the village and the doors of all the long houses were closed. Grim men stood on guard with clubs and spears and there was no game hung from the racks or skins stretched for tanning. The people looked hungry.

The elder sachem of the village came out and the tallest of the four hunters spoke to him.

"Uncle," the hunter said, "we have come to help you get rid of the monster."

(cont.)

“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#8 Jun 14, 2008
(cont.)

Then the fattest and laziest of the four brothers spoke. "Uncle," he said, "is there some food we can eat? Can we find a place to rest before we start chasing this big bear. I'm tired."

The first hunter shook his head and smiled. "My brother is only joking, Uncle." he said. " We are going now to pick up the monster bear's trail."

"I am not sure you can do that, Nephews," the elder sachem said. "Though we find tracks closer and closer to the doors of our lodges each morning, whenever we try to follow those tracks they disappear."

The second hunter knelt down and patted the head of their small dog. "Uncle," he said, that is because they do not have a dog such as ours." He pointed to the two black circles above the eyes of the small dog. "Four-Eyes can see any tracks, even those many days old."

"May Creator's protection be with you," said the elder sachem.

"Do not worry. Uncle," said the third hunter, "Once we are on a trail we never stop following until we've finished our hunt," the fourth hunter said. "That's why I think we should have something to eat first." But his brothers did not listen. They nodded to the elder sachem and began to leave. Sighing, the fattest and laziest of the brothers lifted up his long spear and trudged after them.

They walked, following their little dog. It kept lifting up its head, as if to look around with its four eyes. The trail was not easy to find.

"Brothers," the fattest and laziest hunter complained, "don't you think we should rest. We've been walking a long time." But his brothers paid no attention to him. Though they could see no tracks, they could feel the presence of the Nyah-gwaheh. They knew that if they did not soon find its trail, it would make its way behind them. Then they would be the hunted ones.

The fattest and laziest brother took out his pemmican pouch. At least he could eat while they walked along. He opened the pouch and shook out the food he had prepared so carefully by pounding together strips of meat and berries with maple sugar and then drying them in the sun. But instead of pemmican, pale squirming things fell out into his hands. The magic of the Nyah-gwaheh had changed the food into worms.

"Brothers," the fattest and laziest of the hunters shouted, "Let's hurry up and catch that big bear! Look what it did to my pemmican. Now I'm getting angry!"

Meanwhile, like a pale giant shadow, the Nyah-gwaheh was moving through the trees close to the hunters. Its mouth was open as it watched them and its huge teeth shone, its eyes flashed red. Soon it would be behind them and on their trail.

Just then, though, the little dog lifted its head and yelped. "Eh-heh!" the first brother called.

"Four-Eyes has found the trail," shouted the second brother.

"We have the track of the Nyah-gwaheh," said the third brother.

"Big Bear," the fattest and laziest one yelled, "we are after you, now!"

“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#9 Jun 14, 2008
(cont.)
Fear filled the heart of the great bear for the first time and it began to run. As it broke from the cover of the pines, the four hunters saw it, a gigantic white shape, so pale as to appear almost naked. With loud hunting cries, they began to run after it. The great bear's strides were long and it ran more swiftly than a deer. The four hunters and their little dog were swift also though and they did not fall behind. The trail led through the swamps and the thickets. It was easy to read, for the bear pushed everything aside as it ran, even knocking down big trees. On and on they ran, over hills and through valleys. They came to the slope of a mountain and followed the trail higher and higher, every now and then catching a glimpse of their quarry over the next rise. Now though the lazy hunter was getting tired of running. He pretended to fall and twist his ankle.
"Brothers," he called, "I have sprained my ankle. You must carry me."
So his three brothers did as he asked, two of them carrying him by turns while the third hunter carried his spear. They ran more slowly now because of their heavy load, but they were not falling any further behind. The day had turned now into night, yet they could still see the white shape of the great bear ahead of them. They were at the top of the mountain now and the ground beneath them was very dark as they ran across it. The bear was tiring, but so were they. It was not easy to carry their fat and lazy brother. The little dog, Four-Eyes, was close behind the great bear, nipping at its tail as it ran.
"Brothers," said the fattest and laziest one. "Put me down now. I think my leg has gotten better."
The brothers did as he asked. Fresh and rested, the fattest and laziest one grabbed his spear and dashed ahead of the others. Just as the great bear turned to bite at the little dog, the fattest and laziest hunter leveled his spear and thrust it into the heart of the Nyah-Gwaheh. The monster bear fell dead.
By the time the other brothers caught up, the fattest and laziest hunter had already built a fire and was cutting up the big bear.
"Come on, brothers," he said. "Let's eat. All this running has made me hungry!"
So they cooked the meat of the great bear and its fat sizzled as it dripped from their fire. They ate until even the fattest and laziest one was satisfied and leaned back in contentment. Just then, though, the first hunter looked down at his feet.
"Brothers," he exclaimed, "look below us!"
The four hunters looked down. Below them were thousands of small sparkling lights in the darkness which. they realized, was all around them.
"We aren't on a mountain top at all," said the third brother. "We are up in the sky." And it was so. The great bear had indeed been magical. Its feet had taken it high above the earth as it tried to escape the four hunters. However, their determination not to give up the chase had carried them up that strange trail.
Just then their little dog yipped twice.
"The great bear!" said the second hunter. "Look!"
The hunters looked. There, where they had piled the bones of their feast the Great Bear was coming back to life and rising to its feet. As they watched, it began to run again, the small dog close on its heels.
"Follow me," shouted the first brother. Grabbing up their spears, the four hunters again began to chase the great bear across the skies.
So it was, the old people say, and so it still is. Each autumn the hunters chase the great bear across the skies and kill it. Then, as they cut it up for their meal, the blood falls down from the heavens and colors the leaves of the maple trees scarlet. They cook the bear and the fat dripping from their fire turns the grass white.

“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#10 Jun 14, 2008
If you look carefully into the skies as the seasons change, you can read that story. The great bear is the square shape some call the bowl of the Big Dipper. The hunters and their small dog (which you can just barely see) are close behind, forming the dipper's handle. When autumn comes and that constellation turns upside down, the old people say. "Ah, the lazy hunter has killed the bear." But as the moons pass and the sky moves once more towards spring, the bear slowly rises back on its feet and the chase begins again.

“"never forget"”

Since: Mar 08

Location hidden

#12 Jun 30, 2008
ChinsRule and Yoga Chic, I enjoyed reading both of your posts. The stories were amazing. Thank you for sharing them with me.

Peace

“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#13 Jul 1, 2008
JUSTGUY wrote:
ChinsRule and Yoga Chic, I enjoyed reading both of your posts. The stories were amazing. Thank you for sharing them with me.
Peace
You are most welcome but really, thank you! We've had other Native forums on Top Stories but decided to move over here. I worked for some time trying to get different places for each subject to post in so it wouldn't be so hard to refer back to as it is if we are just on one thread.
You are more than welcome to jump in at the Den. That's where we just talk and get to know each other. There's plenty of room as our Den can expand as needed. If you'd like, pick a corner and put in your favorite chair and just say hey!
Oh, if you have any ideas of what could be added as an inidividual thread, like something I left out, just let me know.
Great to meet you by the way, I'm YC. Cool avatar.

“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#14 Jul 1, 2008
The Wolf and the Indian once lived in harmony......They hunted together and their spirits touched.
__________

It's not surprising that the Indian saw the wolf as a significant animal. Both were hunters of which the survival of their families depended. The Indian was very aware of the many ways in which his own life resembled those of the wolf. The wolf hunted for himself and for his family. The wolf defended his pack against enemy attack, as the Indian defended his tribe. He had to be strong as an individual and for the good of the pack. It was a sufficient system of survival; and in the eyes of the Indian, no animal did this as well as the wolf. The Indian worked to be as well intigrated in his environment, as he could see the wolf was in the universe.
The hunter did not see the wolf as an enemy or competitor, or as something less than himself. His perception of the wolf was a realistic assessment of the wolf's ability to survive and thrive, to be in balance with the world they shared. He respected the wolf's patience and perseverance, which were his most effective hunting weapons. To say he hunted like a wolf was the highest compliment, just as to say a warrior fought like the wolf was high praise.
The wolf moved silently without effort, but with purpose. He was alert to the smallest changes in is world. He could see far and his hearing was sharp. When an Indian went into enemy territory, he wished to move exactly like this, to sense things like the wolf.
By Jon Van Zyle
__________

The wolf fulfilled two roles for the Indian: he was a powerful and mysterious animal, and so perceived by most tribes, and he was a medicine animal, identified with a particular individual, tribe or clan.
At a tribal level, the attraction to the wolf was strong, because the wolf lived in a way that made the tribe strong. He provided food for all, including the old and sick members of the pack. He saw to the education of his children. He defended his territory against other wolves.
At a personal level, those for whom the wolf was a medicine animal or personal totem understood the qualities that made the wolf stand out as an individual. For example, his stamina, ability to track well and go without food for long periods.

“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#15 Jul 1, 2008
cont.

The definition and defense of home range was as important to the Indian as it was to the wolf. The boundries of most Indian territories, like those of wolves, changed with the movement of game herds, the size of the tribe and the time of year.
The tribe, like the pack broke up at certain times of the year, and joined together later to hunt more efficiently. Both the wolf and the Indian hunted the same type of game and moved their families to follow specific game herds.
Deer sought security from Indian hunters by moving into the border area between warring tribes, where hunters were least likely to show up, just as they did between wolf territories, where wolves spent the least time hunting.
__________
The Indian believed that dying was not a tragic event. It was important to the Indian that he die well, with dignity, to consciously choose to die even if it is inevitable. This kind of self control in the face of death earns a warrior the greatest glory. This way of thinking is similar to the moment of eye contact when a wolf meets it's prey. This "conversation of death" determines whether the prey lives or dies. The prey must be willing to die. There is a nobility in this mutual agreement.
Among the Cherokee, was a belief that to kill a wolf was to invite retribution from other wolves. This way of thinking parallels the laws of the tribe, where to kill an Indian meant to expect revenge from his family members.
Wolves ate grass, as Indians ate wild plants, both for medicinal reasons. Both were family oriented and highly social in structure. Both the Indian and the wolf used a sign language.
__________
Wolves and Cree Indians in Alberta maneuvered buffalo out onto lake ice, where the big animals lost their footing and were more easily killed.
Pueblo Indians and wolves in Arizona ran deer to exhaustion, though it might have taken the Pueblos to do it.
Wolf and Shoshoni Indian lay flat on the prairie grass of Wyoming and slowly waved, the one its tail, the other a strip of hide, to attract curious but elusive antelope close enough to kill.
Debra McCann

“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#16 Jul 1, 2008
The Wolf (wa-hya or wa-ya in Tsalagi/Cherokee)



To Native Americans, the wolf is a powerful
spiritual symbol. They are considered to be
teachers or pathfinders. The wolf star was red,
an esteemed color, associated with the wolf by
all tribes. Also known as Sirius, it is the brightest
star in the Northern Sky. The milky way was the
wolf's trail-the route to heaven. In time, the wolf
also became associated among the four seasons
with summer, among the trees with the willow,
and among the great natural forces with the clouds.

The indians respected the wolf's prowess as
a hunter, his stamina, and the way he moved
silently across the landscape. They were moved
by his howling, which they sometimes regarded
as talking with the spirit world. The wolf appears in
many legends as a messenger, great long distance
travelor and a guide for anyone seeking the spirit
world. He was the forerunner of new ideas who
returned to the clan to teach and share medicine.

“Hug A Tree”

Since: Oct 07

Help Save Our Wolves

#17 Jul 1, 2008
cont.

Wolf is the Grand teacher. Wolf is the sage,
who after many winters upon the sacred path
and seeking the ways of wisdom, returns to share
new knowledge with the tribe. Wolf is both the
radical and the traditional in the same breath.
When the Wolf walks by you - you will remember.

The old ones tell us stories about our beginnings
and of a time when human kind first came to live
upon this Earth. It was Wolf who taught Humans
the ways of living in harmony. It was Wolf who
taught us how to form community upon this Earth,
for Wolves have an intuitive knowledge of order
through chaos and they possess the ability to
survive change, intact.

Wolf medicine is very ancient and born of living
experience. Wolf will look deep into your heart
and share the greatest of knowledge, but will
demand full participation, and absolute sincerity.
When Wolf has walked by you, the very presence of
the wolf will rekindle old memories within your soul.

Through the friction of experience you rekindle
the emotional fires of the inner soul and question
the manifestations of your own consciousness.
You can own a thing only when you have come to
own the emotional experience of it, and realize
the responsibility for its creation. then you are
free to continue. Wolf medicine can make you whole.

You will return to Wolf many times in your life as
you complete and begin your cycles of experience
and seek the inner truth.
Leadfoot

United States

#18 Jul 1, 2008
YC, thank you

“"never forget"”

Since: Mar 08

Location hidden

#19 Jul 1, 2008
yoga chic wrote:
<quoted text>You are most welcome but really, thank you! We've had other Native forums on Top Stories but decided to move over here. I worked for some time trying to get different places for each subject to post in so it wouldn't be so hard to refer back to as it is if we are just on one thread.
You are more than welcome to jump in at the Den. That's where we just talk and get to know each other. There's plenty of room as our Den can expand as needed. If you'd like, pick a corner and put in your favorite chair and just say hey!
Oh, if you have any ideas of what could be added as an inidividual thread, like something I left out, just let me know.
Great to meet you by the way, I'm YC. Cool avatar.
Hey YC, thank you for the invitation to join the den. It is greatly appreciated. I will drop in from time to time. I would love to learn more about the NA culture.

Peace
ChinsRule

United States

#20 Jul 2, 2008
Welcome JustGuy! We'll probably call you "JG" because we tend to assign initials or partial names to avoid typing so much.*L*

This is the link to our little world here: http://www.topix.com/forum/who/native-america...

As you can see, you can read and post your favorite Native American legends, folklore, quotes and prayers on this thread.

For general conversation, click on that link and come on into the Den. That's where we can gab about anything and don't have to stay on topic.

Glad to have you with us!

:o)

Oh, and, i occasionally forget who i am, so if there's a post on here by "Buy A Clue" ... ermm, it's me.

::sheepish grin::

I blame that entirely on LeadFoot.

:D
ChinsRule

United States

#21 Jul 2, 2008
"The Wolf" was good stuff, YC, as was the loooooooooooooooooooong one about Bear. Sometimes long is good, i think. It's very difficult to communicate all one would say in just a few sentences are a couple of paragraphs.

I *enjoy* the longer stories and posts. They seem more informative ... at least to me.:o)

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