Mozart: Creativity and Fictional Adornment

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RonPrice

Perth, Australia

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#1
Aug 20, 2006
 
A SEIZING SENSE OF DELIGHT

Civilization, which for so long had been dependent on great monastaries and palaces...could now emanate from a cottage, a simple room or garden house. Civilization could be seen in the paintings of Turner, in what Clarke calls his picturesque sublime, where light is the principle person; it could be heard in a new voice in poetry and a new music. Indeed it was a veritable explosion of expression.
-Ron Price with thanks to Kenneth Clark, Civilization, Penguin Books, 1969. p.199.

Hearing a new music in those
desert lands1 while a world of
music opened up for Mozart2
telling of things to come, a
new age of sound and beauty,
a great announcement, a new
path of power, of deep joy and
lamentation, some intense thirst,
unallayable, some yearning
unsatisfiable, some receptivity,
distinctly fresh, subtle, an
immense store of controlled
energy, increasing consciousness
of intellectual power, spiritual
insight, perspicacity, an unburdening
of the soul, a rushing in, an overpowering
sense of delight seizing music, poetry, arts.3

1 Shaykh Ahmad left his home in northeast Arabia for Bahrain to begin a half century(1792-1844) of "preparing the way".
2 Mozart died in 1791 after years of an incredible outburst of creative power.
3 I have tried to capture the essence of a period of classical music, Romanticism in poetry and literature and other developments in science and technology that was like a limitless font of creative outburst, an essence that is arguably related to the appearance of twin-manifestations in the 19th century.

Ron Price
7 December 1997
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ALONE: Thinking About Mozart

When I am completely myself, entirely alone and in good cheer, ideas flow best and most abundantly. How they come I know not. These ideas fire my soul and something like a beautiful picture or statue comes into my mind, at a glance, all at once. What a delight! It is like a pleasing, lively dream. When I write it down it comes out of the bag of my memory where it lies, already finished.
-A summary of Wolfgang Mozart's description of how he composed his music in The Life of Mozart.

My poetry comes to me best when I am alone and in good spirits, with plenty of good books to read and stimulate my mind, with a plentiful supply of vivid memories, then life surges into utterance, reason elaborates feelings and, swiftly, words mount onto the page like 'etherial finger-paintings.'

Sometimes the product is like that of a child, with little depth; at other times the product seems divine.-Ron Price, Pioneering Over Four Epochs.

Let there be no mistake, though, the compositional process was not an easy, a simple, a linear, exercise devoid of effort. Much that is the life of Mozart in recent years was not intended by their authors to be documentary biography. It enjoys the license of the story-teller who embellishes his tale with fictional ornament. Be warned, ye who look for objective fact!-Ron Price, Tasmania
RonPrice

Perth, Australia

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#2
Aug 20, 2006
 
The above prose and poetry resulted in the following reflection.
FAR FEWER PEOPLE TO PLEASE NOW

“Success and a desire to please no longer have a part to play in his life,” writes William Stafford (The Mozart Myths: A Critical Reassessment, Stanford UP, Stanford 1991, p.219) about Mozart in his latter years. These words raised the question for me just what my life had been and what it had become in relation to these themes of personal success and pleasing others.

Well, not quite, William;
it’s not quite that way for me.
The desire to please,
I think, will always
be with me. It’s ingrained
in the brain, part of a socialized
conscience, constitution, way,
in this new Order, part of the
sine qua non of my days, now,
of the social organizations I’ve
worked in, a survival mechanism,
part of love’s way, one could say—
nothing new here. Distinction, too,
has its place and I’ve had my share
of that—and this poetry? Well,
we shall see;
we shall see.

Ron Price
21 April 2000
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That's all folks!

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