Since: May 12

Location hidden

#1435 Jul 30, 2013
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm happy that your new relationship is working out for you and that you found someone special, Jermaine.
Thanks Octo.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1436 Jul 31, 2013
Have there ever been two radically different albums recorded by a musical act than these two? "TSMR" was released during the "Summer of Love" in 1967.

"Without a doubt, no Rolling Stones album -- and, indeed, very few rock albums from any era -- split critical opinion as much as the Rolling Stones' psychedelic outing. Many dismiss the record as sub-Sgt. Pepper posturing; others confess, if only in private, to a fascination with the album's inventive arrangements, which incorporated some African rhythms, Mellotrons, and full orchestration. What's clear is that never before or after did the Stones take so many chances in the studio.(Some critics and fans feel that the record has been unfairly undervalued, partly because purists expect the Stones to constantly champion a blues 'n' raunch worldview.) About half the material is very strong, particularly the glorious "She's a Rainbow," with its beautiful harmonies, piano, and strings; the riff-driven "Citadel"; the hazy, dream-like "In Another Land," Bill Wyman's debut writing (and singing) credit on a Stones release; and the majestically dark and doomy cosmic rocker "2000 Light Years from Home," with some of the creepiest synthesizer effects (devised by Brian Jones) ever to grace a rock record. The downfall of the album was caused by some weak songwriting on the lesser tracks, particularly the interminable psychedelic jam "Sing This All Together (See What Happens)." It's a much better record than most people give it credit for being, though, with a strong current of creeping uneasiness that undercuts the gaudy psychedelic flourishes. In 1968, the Stones would go back to the basics, and never wander down these paths again, making this all the more of a fascinating anomaly in the group's discography."

- allmusic

One year later, The Stones released "Beggar's Banquet," sounding like a completely different band.

"The Stones forsook psychedelic experimentation to return to their blues roots on this celebrated album, which was immediately acclaimed as one of their landmark achievements. A strong acoustic Delta blues flavor colors much of the material, particularly "Salt of the Earth" and "No Expectations," which features some beautiful slide guitar work. Basic rock & roll was not forgotten, however: "Street Fighting Man," a reflection of the political turbulence of 1968, was one of their most innovative singles, and "Sympathy for the Devil," with its fire-dancing guitar licks, leering Jagger vocals, African rhythms, and explicitly satanic lyrics, was an image-defining epic. On "Stray Cat Blues," Jagger and crew began to explore the kind of decadent sexual sleaze that they would take to the point of self-parody by the mid-'70s. At the time, though, the approach was still fresh, and the lyrical bite of most of the material ensured Beggars Banquet's place as one of the top blues-based rock records of all time."

- allmusic

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1437 Jul 31, 2013
This is the Rolling Stones you see in "Rock-n-Roll Circus." With the exception of Brian Jones, the band looked and sounded great.

Even Keith looked pretty good until they come in for a closeup at the end, featuring Keith singing dual lead vocals on "Salt Of The Earth." You can see his "junkie fangs" there.
Octopus

Schenectady, NY

#1438 Aug 1, 2013
I don't have the original "request" album but have stattered studio outtakes from those sessions on bootleg compilations called, "Time Trips" which came in four or five different volumes. The Stones were obviously enchanted by The Beatles "Sgt Pepper" era and decided to try to do their own version with spotty results. "2000 Light Years From Home" was probably the best track. However, it wasn't The Rolling Stones. They returned to a blues base sound on "Beggers" which modernized their sound greatly. The summer of love was very short lived and by 1968, rock had returned with a harder, basic edge. Of course, The Rolling Stones 1969-1971 era found them as one of the greatest rock n roll bands in the world. They got a billion times better. A very creative period for The Stones. They certainly improved their skills as a touring band, whereas The Beatles focused strictly on making studio albums.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1439 Aug 1, 2013
Octopus wrote:
I don't have the original "request" album but have stattered studio outtakes from those sessions on bootleg compilations called, "Time Trips" which came in four or five different volumes. The Stones were obviously enchanted by The Beatles "Sgt Pepper" era and decided to try to do their own version with spotty results. "2000 Light Years From Home" was probably the best track. However, it wasn't The Rolling Stones. They returned to a blues base sound on "Beggers" which modernized their sound greatly. The summer of love was very short lived and by 1968, rock had returned with a harder, basic edge. Of course, The Rolling Stones 1969-1971 era found them as one of the greatest rock n roll bands in the world. They got a billion times better. A very creative period for The Stones. They certainly improved their skills as a touring band, whereas The Beatles focused strictly on making studio albums.
Have you ever seen "Rock-n-Roll Circus?"

The Stones do a cooking blues-rock version of "Parachute Woman," with Mick on harmonica. Another highlight is "No Expectations" with Brian playing a flawless slide guitar.

John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Keith Richard and Noel Redding do a great version of "Yer Blues" too!

You can skip the song Yoko shrieks on.
Octopus

Schenectady, NY

#1440 Aug 2, 2013
ononothimagin wrote:
<quoted text>
Have you ever seen "Rock-n-Roll Circus?"
The Stones do a cooking blues-rock version of "Parachute Woman," with Mick on harmonica. Another highlight is "No Expectations" with Brian playing a flawless slide guitar.
John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Keith Richard and Noel Redding do a great version of "Yer Blues" too!
You can skip the song Yoko shrieks on.
Of course I've seen "Rock N Roll Circus"

The Stones have plenty of unseen vault material that have been slowly released over the years. I've even seen the excellent bootleg concert film, "C*cksucker Blues" The Stones used parts of it for their new "Crossfire Hurricane" DVD release. John Lennon and Eric Clapton named their band, "The Dirty Mac" on "The Rock N Roll Circus" which featured performances by Jethro Tull and The Who. Yoko had another song written about her on the program called, "Whole Lotta Yoko" I've heard that Mick Jagger originally wanted Led Zeppelin but decided to go with Jethro Tull instead. I've wondered why Jimi Hendrix did not take part and why "Rock N Roll Circus" was shelved. I like diving into rock history and hearing things I've never heard before. It is the same with Elvis.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1441 Aug 2, 2013
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
Of course I've seen "Rock N Roll Circus"
The Stones have plenty of unseen vault material that have been slowly released over the years. I've even seen the excellent bootleg concert film, "C*cksucker Blues" The Stones used parts of it for their new "Crossfire Hurricane" DVD release. John Lennon and Eric Clapton named their band, "The Dirty Mac" on "The Rock N Roll Circus" which featured performances by Jethro Tull and The Who. Yoko had another song written about her on the program called, "Whole Lotta Yoko" I've heard that Mick Jagger originally wanted Led Zeppelin but decided to go with Jethro Tull instead. I've wondered why Jimi Hendrix did not take part and why "Rock N Roll Circus" was shelved. I like diving into rock history and hearing things I've never heard before. It is the same with Elvis.
Yeah, Jethro Tull was great.

I would've preferred to hear The Who play something different than "A Quick One (While He's Away)" but it certainly does show how versatile they were.

The DVD I have has an interview with Townshend at the end.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1442 Aug 2, 2013
I actually listened to the song Yoko shrieks on yesterday all the way through. I always skipped it in the past.

It's astounding how horrible she was. I'm surprised Clapton and Richard could keep straight faces.
Octopus

Schenectady, NY

#1443 Aug 2, 2013
ononothimagin wrote:
I actually listened to the song Yoko shrieks on yesterday all the way through. I always skipped it in the past.
It's astounding how horrible she was. I'm surprised Clapton and Richard could keep straight faces.
I really didn't mind Yoko on "Rock N Roll Circus"

She seemed to sneak up on The Dirty Mac as they were playing and the music was loud. Eric Clapton couldn't have been that down on Yoko because he played on an unreleased studio jam session with The Beatles with Yoko singing as strictly their lead singer. That was certainly way worse. Yoko ruined the whole thing. However, George Harrison took over and did a few of his numbers. It got a billion times better. It is featured as part of a bootleg Beatles box set called, "True Masters"

I wouldn't know what Keith Richards thought of Yoko but I think the musicians accepted her because of John.
Octopus

Schenectady, NY

#1444 Aug 2, 2013
Derek And The Dominos made an unreleased second album that sounded unfinished but this one song called, "Devil Road" was incredible. It featured an unnamed female singer. Eric Clapton's guitar playing on that tune even blows away anything Jimi Hendrix has ever done. His masterful playing was fusion and this was recorded at Olympic studios in London in April-May of 1971. It wasn't blues Clapton. Quite frankly, it surprised me. Eric Clapton never really shown his full potential on his softer radio hits. "Devil Road" makes "Stairway To Heaven" look over rated. Most people think of Clapton in his "Tears In Heaven" mode. I got to say "Devil Road" certainly changed my opinion on Clapton. I do like Clapton's under rated eighties album, "Behind The Sun" though. It should've been a much bigger hit because it was perfect.
Octopus

Schenectady, NY

#1445 Aug 2, 2013
ononothimagin wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah, Jethro Tull was great.
I would've preferred to hear The Who play something different than "A Quick One (While He's Away)" but it certainly does show how versatile they were.
The DVD I have has an interview with Townshend at the end.
I was blown away by "Rock N Roll Circus" when the CD and DVD first came out a few years back. Obviously, it was intended to be a rock n roll television special, which never saw the light of day in 1968. A very historical document of what was going on in music during that period. Jethro Tull was very good and I enjoyed all the performances from all the acts featured. I could tell Brian Jones was certainly messed up. There are better Stones performances around but "Rock N Roll Circus" does offer a certain charm. The Rolling Stones "Get Yer Ya's Ya's Out" is inferior to what they could really do live though. The classic bootleg, "Liver Than You'll Ever Be" is great but has very poor sound quality. However, one of the best Stones live performances is still the soundboard of Leeds 3-13-71. It has some excellent bonus tracks recorded for BBC television in the same era also.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1446 Aug 2, 2013
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
I really didn't mind Yoko on "Rock N Roll Circus"
She seemed to sneak up on The Dirty Mac as they were playing and the music was loud. Eric Clapton couldn't have been that down on Yoko because he played on an unreleased studio jam session with The Beatles with Yoko singing as strictly their lead singer. That was certainly way worse. Yoko ruined the whole thing. However, George Harrison took over and did a few of his numbers. It got a billion times better. It is featured as part of a bootleg Beatles box set called, "True Masters"
I wouldn't know what Keith Richards thought of Yoko but I think the musicians accepted her because of John.
I really didn't mind Yoko on "Double Fantasy." I thought she was remarkably listenable compared to the ear shredding nonsense she pulled in the past.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1447 Aug 2, 2013
Brian Jones was an enigma. He was responsible for putting the band together in the first place. He was the best looking and most talented member of the group in the beginning. It's confusing how he just let it go. Apparently, he was so sensitive, when the Jagger and Richards took control, he lost the will to live.

Very strange.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1448 Aug 2, 2013
Although Ringo was the most popular member of The Beatles at first (due to his "cuteness factor") it was established early on that John Lennon was the leader. When Paul proved how vital he was to the band's success, he eventually took over. In the end, Paul was trying to tell the others what to do.

Mild mannered George didn't stand a chance.
Octopus

Schenectady, NY

#1449 Aug 2, 2013
ononothimagin wrote:
<quoted text>
I really didn't mind Yoko on "Double Fantasy." I thought she was remarkably listenable compared to the ear shredding nonsense she pulled in the past.
The only time I heard Yoko was the flip side of the 45 rpm single. My 7th grade teacher complained about Yoko on the "Double Fantasy" album in class. I didn't like the b side. It was either "Starting Over" "Woman" or "Watching The Wheels" I forget since it was so long ago. It was right before the hair band era. Van Halen, AC/DC and Ozzy Osbourne took over. It was a musical shift in a heavier direction. I was unaware that John Lennon was an ex Beatle at the time "Starting Over" came out. It was all over top 40 radio before he was shot and killed.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1450 Aug 2, 2013
George is heard to say to Paul in the "Let It Be" documentary, "Just tell me what you want! Whatever it takes to please you, I'll do it!"

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1451 Aug 2, 2013
It's amazing The Beatles pulled together to record one last album after that.

Those sessions were brutal.
Octopus

Schenectady, NY

#1452 Aug 2, 2013
ononothimagin wrote:
Brian Jones was an enigma. He was responsible for putting the band together in the first place. He was the best looking and most talented member of the group in the beginning. It's confusing how he just let it go. Apparently, he was so sensitive, when the Jagger and Richards took control, he lost the will to live.
Very strange.
The Stones claim that Brian Jones took his drugs at all the wrong times and was so wasted that he could barely play. That is why he was let go. You can see him in "Crossfire Hurricane" in the studio as The Stones were playing. Brian was in the corner by himself. The Stones really had no choice but to replace him.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1453 Aug 2, 2013
I know people hate Yoko's presence in the final years of The Beatles but truth be told, John probably smiled in the "Let It Be" film twice as much as Ringo and George combined.

They looked positively miserable.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1454 Aug 2, 2013
I can only recall Ringo smiling 3 times in that film... when he was working on "Octopus's Garden" with George on the piano, when he was clowning around with somebody's kid on the drums and when John sang a line of "Don't Let Me Down" in French.

The rest of the time he looked like he was falling asleep or trying to.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Michael Jackson Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
MJ signed best of compilation album from 1975 f... 21 min lovinMJ 12
Wacko photoshoot, circa 1993 33 min Jina Wild_ 36
If Michael Jackson was standing in front of you... 37 min persephone 222
Are MJ Fans Worried? 54 min An NFL Fan 82
Xavier Smith: The legendary Thriller turns 31 2 hr Sleepingboy 18
Michael Jackson's Earth Song Is Top Brits Perfo... 3 hr Jina Wild_ 10
Who's the King, Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley,... (Dec '09) 6 hr Listen Up 7,205