Drug case brings 20 year jail term

Drug case brings 20 year jail term

There are 23 comments on the The Standard Democrat story from Mar 10, 2010, titled Drug case brings 20 year jail term. In it, The Standard Democrat reports that:

A Howardville man was sentenced to prison Tuesday for selling crack in New Madrid.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Standard Democrat.

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damn

Saint Louis, MO

#1 Mar 22, 2010
20 years without parole? nice knowing you Derrick!
The Dodger

United States

#2 Mar 22, 2010
I'm on the fence about this. 20 Years does sound very harsh. Then again, I'm against chemical based drug use and people who make/sell them. Crack Cocaine is a very addictive drug and has a very damaging effect on the body. I compare cocaine/crack/meth users to Zombies (but at least zombies seek brains...that's not so bad right?)

But I have to ask, does this change anything? It isn't going to stop the users from getting their fix. It just means someone else got new business. The intent of the harsh imprisionment is to teach a lesson and prevent that person from dealing drugs again. Surely they aren't dealing drugs in jail, so from a law stand-point it's a success. 20 years in jail will surely leave a life long impression on the person, but weither or not they sell drugs after release is uncertian and unproven. They might do it again if when released and nobody will hire them for a job. What would you want them to do then? It seems the tax payer will be taking care of this person until the day they die now.

I could understand such a long term had the suspect harmed another person or sold it to children or assulted police, but if none of those things were in the case, perhaps the jail term should have been a little less. I don't claim to know the details of the case, so I can't say none of those things happened. I don't spend my days in court hearing case files. From all I have to read, it seems like a simple drug dealing charge (added with other charges that are no different than the first charge, basicly charging the person several times for the same crime, just different wording).

Don't get me wrong, I'm not against the punishment of this person. In my opinion, they were a source of a deep problem we have. I'm completely for law enforcement going after these "chemical" based drug dealers. I think they could catch a lot more of these type of dealers who sell meth/crack in the area had they the soul focus of finding them when it comes to the War on Drugs. But we know Crack/Meth isn't the focus of this so-called War.
guest

AOL

#3 Mar 26, 2010
We need to sentence all loser's life sentence on the 2nd offense. I promise this will end the repeat offenders a 3rd time and the streets/people will be alot safer.
The Dodger

United States

#4 Mar 26, 2010
Well 'guest', why stop there? Why not just shoot them in the head on the first offense and be done with it? Why only drug dealers? Let's do it for Drunk Drivers. Let's do it for J-Walkers. Let's go ahead and do it for people who get a speeding ticket.
Hope

Nashville, TN

#5 Mar 26, 2010
If all drugs were legalized for personal consumption, crack/meth would not exist. Coke would be cheap enough that no one would do either of those. I'm kind of with Guest on this one. Do you really think that a second felony conviction is an accident? I believe that anyone can make a mistake and I've make plenty in my life and lots of people have helped me out along the way. If you are broke and trying to feed your kids and rob a convenience store, I can see some mercy coming your way, but if you do it again, I'm not sure you are good society material. You might be better off in a more confined environment. One of the unintended consequences of the "3 strikes" laws has been that more crooks shoot at cops, so cops don't care for the "3 strikes" laws like you might think.
The Dodger

United States

#6 Mar 26, 2010
I agree Hope. My previous comment was what I call 'sarcasium gone wrong'. A '2 Strike' rule would result in people thinking twice about re-commiting a crime (with exception of one). I was not at all trying to imply that legalizing ALL illegal drugs would fix or stop such crimes from being commited.

However, I was implying legalizing the use of a certain 'illegal plant'.
Get Real

Olathe, KS

#7 Mar 27, 2010
I personally think 20 years was terrible. I don't do drugs and i personally think that black men are really being a target. You have rapist, molesters, and killers that are not getting no where near as much time as black drug dealers. Getting some sort of punishment is needed, but 20 years, come on.
Hope

Nashville, TN

#8 Mar 27, 2010
Get Real wrote:
I personally think 20 years was terrible. I don't do drugs and i personally think that black men are really being a target. You have rapist, molesters, and killers that are not getting no where near as much time as black drug dealers. Getting some sort of punishment is needed, but 20 years, come on.
There is probably a lot of truth in that, and for the record, I am for the legalization of all drugs for this reason, the premium on drugs that results from them being illegal finances gang activity in this country and violence in the Mexican drug cartels. American farmers would benefit greatly from the legalization of pot, all citizens would benefit from the tax revenues and people who were on the verge of becoming addicts would have more access to help. However, back to the discrimination issue, while I believe that black men are somewhat targeted, nobody makes them become drug dealers. They reap the rewards and when they get caught they pay the piper.
guest

Saint Louis, MO

#9 Mar 29, 2010
Get Real wrote:
I personally think 20 years was terrible. I don't do drugs and i personally think that black men are really being a target. You have rapist, molesters, and killers that are not getting no where near as much time as black drug dealers. Getting some sort of punishment is needed, but 20 years, come on.
you are right, this black man was a target, because he is a drug dealer!
Miss Bossy

United States

#10 Mar 30, 2010
Well from what I've seen the 3 strike rule is not working. These drug dealers get 5 years, spend their time in jail, learn all the ropes in prison, join gangs to survive, deal whatever they can in prison just have a candy bar or soda. Then they get out in 5 years and join a gang outside of prison and are no better than they were when they went in. They have learned to lot more in prision, and usually end up back in prison within a year I don't believe the prison system is working they way it is today. There are more prisons being built everyday, so that should tell us something. Most of the offenders are repeat offenders. Maybe if they would legalize some drugs, at least these people could make a living from selling drugs. I don't know if that's they answer or not, but something has to change if this country is going to survive and have qualified members of society that run the country in the future.
Hope

Mount Juliet, TN

#11 Mar 30, 2010
Miss Bossy wrote:
Well from what I've seen the 3 strike rule is not working. These drug dealers get 5 years, spend their time in jail, learn all the ropes in prison, join gangs to survive, deal whatever they can in prison just have a candy bar or soda. Then they get out in 5 years and join a gang outside of prison and are no better than they were when they went in. They have learned to lot more in prision, and usually end up back in prison within a year I don't believe the prison system is working they way it is today. There are more prisons being built everyday, so that should tell us something. Most of the offenders are repeat offenders. Maybe if they would legalize some drugs, at least these people could make a living from selling drugs. I don't know if that's they answer or not, but something has to change if this country is going to survive and have qualified members of society that run the country in the future.
You are also correct. Prison is nothing but grad school for criminals. If you take the non-violent offenders out of prison,(legalizing drugs), you will create a much more manageable problem. It is also much easier to justify a long prison term for a second time violent offender.
yeah

Saint Louis, MO

#12 Mar 30, 2010
Miss Bossy wrote:
Well from what I've seen the 3 strike rule is not working. These drug dealers get 5 years, spend their time in jail, learn all the ropes in prison, join gangs to survive, deal whatever they can in prison just have a candy bar or soda. Then they get out in 5 years and join a gang outside of prison and are no better than they were when they went in. They have learned to lot more in prision, and usually end up back in prison within a year I don't believe the prison system is working they way it is today. There are more prisons being built everyday, so that should tell us something. Most of the offenders are repeat offenders. Maybe if they would legalize some drugs, at least these people could make a living from selling drugs. I don't know if that's they answer or not, but something has to change if this country is going to survive and have qualified members of society that run the country in the future.
but seeing as how this man will be in his 60's when he is released from prison I don't see him becoming a drug kingpin in his old age
nanaan

United States

#13 Apr 13, 2010
What i think if get tight of the drug dealing maybe it want be no drug user.
Hope

Nashville, TN

#14 Apr 13, 2010
nanaan wrote:
What i think if get tight of the drug dealing maybe it want be no drug user.
Can I get an English translation of this?
The Dodger

Blue Springs, MO

#15 Apr 13, 2010
I studied incorrect English in school, and I believe it translates to:

"I think if they become tighter on drug dealing, there maybe no users who can get their drugs."

Though to be honest, my translation is loose due to that whole sentance being entirely flawed from start to finish. What they were saying is if they focus harder on catching drug dealers, then the users would have no where to get their drugs.

It's a novel idea, but that's the same logic that is already in place today. It's just not working.

Since: Aug 09

Location hidden

#16 Apr 15, 2010
once again, well said dodger. the problem itself has a head too large too cut off. in order to take drugs off the streets we(americans) would have to stop doing business with a lot of countries. sorry so sloppy!
Hope

Mount Juliet, TN

#17 Apr 15, 2010
It doesn't matter what you do, you are not going to take drugs off of the streets because the money is enough to make people take chances. They are willing to bet 20 yrs. of their life against not working for $8 an hr. somewhere for 20 yrs. Legalize drugs and the price goes way down, way down. The farmers can grow hemp, the growers can grow marijuana. The poppy growers in S. America make a good living, meth goes away (I don't think anyone would snort meth if coke was available for less money). Crime goes down, tax collections go up. Cops can focus on violent criminals. People who abuse drugs can get help easier. Prisons would be much less crowded and would only contain people who should be there (for the most part). The disparity between whites/blacks in prison would drop. The only people who don't want this are slow-thinkers and the alcohol industry.
no real answer

Saint Louis, MO

#18 Apr 15, 2010
Hope wrote:
It doesn't matter what you do, you are not going to take drugs off of the streets because the money is enough to make people take chances. They are willing to bet 20 yrs. of their life against not working for $8 an hr. somewhere for 20 yrs. Legalize drugs and the price goes way down, way down. The farmers can grow hemp, the growers can grow marijuana. The poppy growers in S. America make a good living, meth goes away (I don't think anyone would snort meth if coke was available for less money). Crime goes down, tax collections go up. Cops can focus on violent criminals. People who abuse drugs can get help easier. Prisons would be much less crowded and would only contain people who should be there (for the most part). The disparity between whites/blacks in prison would drop. The only people who don't want this are slow-thinkers and the alcohol industry.
see I don't buy this argument. Every item in my house is completely legal and available to purchase at any public store. But I still have to lock my doors while I am away because someone could come in and steal those legal items.

Another example is cigarettes. They are legal to purchase (if you are of age) and are taxed heavily but they have become the newest major source of funding for organized crime in the bigger cities.

there is no real answer to the drug problem. Because the motivation in the drug game is the same motivation that has plagued society since the beginning of time...money. If there is a shortcut to making money people are going to take it. If drugs were legalized tomorrow, that wouldn't automatically put millions of drug dealers out of business. They would just figure out new ways to make the easy money selling drugs.
Molly

Jackson, MO

#20 Jul 27, 2010
why
Got balls

United States

#21 Jul 28, 2010
Boy it is so easy for all of the arm chair philosophers to sit back and see what is wrong with the system and what cops and judges should and shouanything about the law? Besides being convicted of something.Do any of you really know how difficult it is to pros. a drug case to get to the top or even an upper level dealer and convict them? It takes years of work on just one group or person then when you do this you can neglect others allowing them to flourish but this is off of the 20 yr subject.

Time in the pen is not only to rehabilitate but to act as a deterrent to break the law. Maybe and I say maybe if some see a large sentence they may backoff realizing it could take a lot out of their life though I know from personal experience most don't but you can bet you lower body parts that if it is just a slap on the wrist many more will get in the business. No real answer, you are right. Want to help? Stop bitchin and have the balls to act as an informant. Yea did not think so...

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