More doctors are ditching the old pre...

More doctors are ditching the old prescription pad

There are 16 comments on the NBC29 story from May 17, 2012, titled More doctors are ditching the old prescription pad. In it, NBC29 reports that:

Doctors increasingly are ditching the prescription pad: More than a third of the nation's prescriptions now are electronic, according to the latest count.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC29.

“I Am No One Else”

Since: Apr 12

Seattle

#1 May 17, 2012
Decreases fraudulent prescriptions a lot too. I love it. now we just need to get them to use a patient records database.

“My Commander-in-Chi ef!”

Since: Jun 07

Obama got Osama!

#2 May 17, 2012
Early this year I went to a new doctor to get a checkup/physical and was blown away when they handed me this big I-PAD-like tablet to tap in all my information along with a questionnaire. It was quick and easy and they had all the information in their computers when I tapped ‘DONE’ after I reviewed everything to make sure it was correct.
I went in dreading having to fill out paperwork but left out amazed at where technology has brought us today. I told the doctor that I was impressed and appreciated how easy he made it, and we laughed when he told me that older patients don’t like it.

Also; cholesterol, blood sugar and all other blood work/urine came back great… exercise and eating right is paying off. 
goose

Carol Stream, IL

#3 May 17, 2012
KittenKoder wrote:
now we just need to get them to use a patient records database.
I think you mean share patient records database (with other health care professionals).
I agree that sounds great, I would love it as well, on the surface. It would open up a real privacy issue.
Electronic prescription ordering is great! If you think it is the answer to eliminating "stolen" prescriptions that is not the case. Look at all the electronic stealing that goes on, identity theft, etc.

“I Am No One Else”

Since: Apr 12

Seattle

#4 May 17, 2012
goose wrote:
<quoted text>
I think you mean share patient records database (with other health care professionals).
I agree that sounds great, I would love it as well, on the surface. It would open up a real privacy issue.
Electronic prescription ordering is great! If you think it is the answer to eliminating "stolen" prescriptions that is not the case. Look at all the electronic stealing that goes on, identity theft, etc.
Yeah, share would be more accurate. But the privacy issue is just a bit of paranoia. People don't realize just how much information banks have on them, or whenever you apply for a job how much information the people just looking over your application/resume sees. Really, there is little to worry about when professionals see all your information, even if they did try something with it, it would be too easy to trace back to them. Most of the electronic crimes are blown out of proportion by the mainstream media, it's not as bad as they make it out to be, and remember that the mainstream media has to try to scare people off the internet, their pocket books are danger of decreasing a bit because of it. ;) If in doubt, ask a geek.
zZz

Charlottesville, VA

#5 May 17, 2012
KittenKoder wrote:
Decreases fraudulent prescriptions a lot too. I love it. now we just need to get them to use a patient records database.
Agree - amazing that there isn't a standard/central database that all providers can access. Someday this will happen and will save thousands of lives a year.
Am sure there have been and are many companies competing to build the infrastructure to use for exchanging patient information. Prolly be a mandate by the Gov. sometime in the next few years.
zZz

Charlottesville, VA

#6 May 17, 2012
goose wrote:
<quoted text>
I think you mean share patient records database (with other health care professionals).
I agree that sounds great, I would love it as well, on the surface. It would open up a real privacy issue.
Electronic prescription ordering is great! If you think it is the answer to eliminating "stolen" prescriptions that is not the case. Look at all the electronic stealing that goes on, identity theft, etc.
Privacy issue not "opened". Ex: everytime you go to a new provider, specialist, etc. ever notice how you have to fill out yet another 2,3 or 4 page form - wasting your time in their office? Do you want your data on 100's of sheet of paper at many providers, anywhere you ever needed service, or a paperless centralized sysytem that allows a provider to look up your metadata, allergies/adverse reactions to prescriptions, etc. etc. within seconds.
In the ambulance or emergency room this is critical to saving time which can save a life. Is privacy a concern? Sure it is - but don't think it's opened, but rather closed a bit tighter.
CHECK SIX

North Port, FL

#7 May 17, 2012
With most Doc's,they SCRIBBLE!...how anyone can read them is amazing?...Or do they? I wonder how many of us got RAT POISON instead of PENICILLIN!...

.When too many people kick the bucket,and its called NATURAL CAUSES??? Makes you wonder......Clear Script Vital Information is long over due,,many of the OLD BASTARD DOCS..have Shaky hands,or their heads some where else!.Like Whats fer Lunch!.

.if you have a good Pharmacist?..he may detect something wrong...But Yer life is in the hands of people who can,and do FUBAR!!...

All should interrogate the Doc with any thing a Doc gives you.....Yer Life depends on it!

If you read the side effects with most medicine???? You would THROW IT OUT!!

The reason Health Care is expensive is these QUACKS need to lawyer up heavily??.....MALPRACTICE ya know!!

Now Under OBAMA CARE..IF OBAMA CARE.?..Forget it.Yer Problem Is Solved!..They are looking to save money..death Panels...and They decide what you get..LIVE OR DIE ..by a LOONY MONKEY FACE BUREAUCRAT!!

ITS THE ECONOMY STUPID!!

“ROCK ON ROCKERS!!”

Since: Mar 11

Rockin' USA ;)

#8 May 17, 2012
TOTALLY agree on the side effects of medicines THAT are supposed to help your condition. WHY even have them distributed or for that matter..EVEN have them patented? EVERYTHING is electronic anymore..HOW MANY folks carry cash nowadays?? Or businesses having a cash register full of bills? It will cut down on the unreadable Doc's handwriting for a fact, plus the prescription order will be waiting on ya..whenever ya decide to pick it up. If by chance, the pharmacist notices a discrepancy in the prescribed amount or strength of concern for a long standing client..they can correct it by reviewing it and send an electronic message to the doctor. All documented by both parties involved..concise and clearly stated.

“I Am No One Else”

Since: Apr 12

Seattle

#10 May 17, 2012
zZz wrote:
<quoted text>
Agree - amazing that there isn't a standard/central database that all providers can access. Someday this will happen and will save thousands of lives a year.
Am sure there have been and are many companies competing to build the infrastructure to use for exchanging patient information. Prolly be a mandate by the Gov. sometime in the next few years.
No mandates needed, medical facilities are doing this all on their own. They are doing it because it saves money and time, lots of both.
DENG

Zhenjiang, China

#12 May 17, 2012
blown away

YAZ, NOW THE TERROR GOVERNMENT MAFIA IN WASHINGTON DC KNOWS EVERYTHING ABOUT YOU.
Marine Corp Pat wrote:
Early this year I went to a new doctor to get a checkup/physical and was blown away when they handed me this big I-PAD-like tablet to tap in all my information along with a questionnaire. It was quick and easy and they had all the information in their computers when I tapped ‘DONE’ after I reviewed everything to make sure it was correct.
I went in dreading having to fill out paperwork but left out amazed at where technology has brought us today. I told the doctor that I was impressed and appreciated how easy he made it, and we laughed when he told me that older patients don’t like it.
Also; cholesterol, blood sugar and all other blood work/urine came back great… exercise and eating right is paying off. &#61514;
zZz

Charlottesville, VA

#13 May 18, 2012
KittenKoder wrote:
<quoted text>
No mandates needed, medical facilities are doing this all on their own. They are doing it because it saves money and time, lots of both.
I said mandated , because not all are, by far. Everyone needs to get on-board to make this work like it's supposed to. The large providers will, for sure.

“I Am No One Else”

Since: Apr 12

Seattle

#14 May 18, 2012
zZz wrote:
<quoted text>
I said mandated , because not all are, by far. Everyone needs to get on-board to make this work like it's supposed to. The large providers will, for sure.
All our clinics, large and small, and pharmacies here have been using the system for over a year now. Unless they can't afford it, most medical facilities will have to, pharmacies are the ones making the switch really.
zZz

Charlottesville, VA

#15 May 18, 2012
KittenKoder wrote:
<quoted text>
All our clinics, large and small, and pharmacies here have been using the system for over a year now. Unless they can't afford it, most medical facilities will have to, pharmacies are the ones making the switch really.
Congrats on your clinics, but am not talking about just your clinics - The goal is for every American to have an electronic medical record by 2014. But according to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine, less than two percent of acute care hospitals in the U.S. currently have a comprehensive electronic medical records system in place, while just four percent of physicians’ practices have such a system up and running.

“I Am No One Else”

Since: Apr 12

Seattle

#16 May 18, 2012
zZz wrote:
<quoted text>
Congrats on your clinics, but am not talking about just your clinics - The goal is for every American to have an electronic medical record by 2014. But according to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine, less than two percent of acute care hospitals in the U.S. currently have a comprehensive electronic medical records system in place, while just four percent of physicians’ practices have such a system up and running.
I did not see that article, so this is news to me. ;) Not that I am doubting it, just that I hadn't realized some areas were still so behind on this. Our one problem is getting the medical centers to start communicating with each other and ... more importantly ... get the freaking doctors to actually at least look at the records. I have had to spend most of several visits explaining my medical history to doctors who are just not spending a few moments to look it up. They ask such redundant questions and waste a lot of time doing it too. My GP says she wished they would as well because sometimes she has to actually push their faces to the computer screen to get the other doctors to read what was put there.
zZz

Charlottesville, VA

#17 May 18, 2012
KittenKoder wrote:
<quoted text>
I did not see that article, so this is news to me. ;) Not that I am doubting it, just that I hadn't realized some areas were still so behind on this. Our one problem is getting the medical centers to start communicating with each other and ... more importantly ... get the freaking doctors to actually at least look at the records. I have had to spend most of several visits explaining my medical history to doctors who are just not spending a few moments to look it up. They ask such redundant questions and waste a lot of time doing it too. My GP says she wished they would as well because sometimes she has to actually push their faces to the computer screen to get the other doctors to read what was put there.
Exactly ... great points. I guess it will take a while; it's human nature to resist change, especially for the old timers who have done the same thing a certain way for decades (and are some of THE best Dr.'s around). Some struggle with it, others embrace it. This isn't going away and won't stay optional too much longer, so might as well get used to it and leverage the med info protocol to make life easier/better for everyone.
goose

Carol Stream, IL

#18 May 18, 2012
KittenKoder wrote:
<quoted text>
I did not see that article, so this is news to me. ;) Not that I am doubting it, just that I hadn't realized some areas were still so behind on this. Our one problem is getting the medical centers to start communicating with each other and ... more importantly ... get the freaking doctors to actually at least look at the records. I have had to spend most of several visits explaining my medical history to doctors who are just not spending a few moments to look it up. They ask such redundant questions and waste a lot of time doing it too. My GP says she wished they would as well because sometimes she has to actually push their faces to the computer screen to get the other doctors to read what was put there.
Interesting. This is not my experience as long as I stay within the same medical system they all have access and do share & look at it electronically.
A huge problem unless you get a common system/ database application. It can be overcome but not without alot of cooperation! Everyone would want "their" system to be the one others would have to conform to.

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