Hydroponics takes farming into future

Hydroponics takes farming into future

There are 64 comments on the South Florida Sun-Sentinel story from Jun 18, 2007, titled Hydroponics takes farming into future. In it, South Florida Sun-Sentinel reports that:

West Delray It looks like something out of Jack and the Beanstalk. Or a mad scientist's lab.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

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Want to see

Lynwood, CA

#1 Jun 18, 2007
Does this company offer tours to the public?
Steve

Pompano Beach, FL

#2 Jun 18, 2007
Amazing article except I have one question. Since all that preserved land along 441 was supposed to be set aside for farming only with no commercial and residential development how is it that they were allowed to build this huge commerical building? I thought that construction like that was banned in that area? What makes their bulding okay while other similar in size commercial buildings illegal to build?
zara

Delray Beach, FL

#3 Jun 18, 2007
Steve wrote:
Amazing article except I have one question. Since all that preserved land along 441 was supposed to be set aside for farming only with no commercial and residential development how is it that they were allowed to build this huge commerical building? I thought that construction like that was banned in that area? What makes their bulding okay while other similar in size commercial buildings illegal to build?
They're allowed to be there because they're in agriculture, that's why that land was preserved.
Steve

Pompano Beach, FL

#4 Jun 18, 2007
zara wrote:
<quoted text>
They're allowed to be there because they're in agriculture, that's why that land was preserved.
But have you seen the building? Just because it's for agriculture gives them the right to do so? It looks, from the road, that the building is at llst 65,000 sq ft. How is it that that type of building does not affect the environment but other similar type buildings do and therefore can not be built? This means that because of a loophole all agricultural users can build huge office commercial buildings if they so choose? If that is the case then all the other agricultural users along 441 should be forced to upgrade their properties because, compared to Pero, they all look like s*it and are an eyesore.
net neutrality

Fort Lauderdale, FL

#7 Jun 18, 2007
count your blessing it is not a pig processing plant where you hear the death squeals all day and night
Casual

United States

#9 Jun 18, 2007
HORRAY FOR HYDRO !
EVERY SIX WEEKS
RED BARON

Deerfield Beach, FL

#13 Jun 18, 2007
This is nothing new. Epcot was doing this since the 1980's. They even use the produce grown there in their on site restaurants.
John new york

Long Beach, NY

#14 Jun 18, 2007
A question: The larger a cucumber or a squash or water mellon grow s doesnt it produce more seedsmaking it more less appealing to eat?
Walt Disney

San Jose, CA

#15 Jun 18, 2007
I've been doing this in my epcot ride for years.....
mojo

Belleville, MI

#18 Jun 18, 2007
John new york wrote:
A question: The larger a cucumber or a squash or water mellon grow s doesnt it produce more seedsmaking it more less appealing to eat?
they are European cucumbers which are seedless
lolol

AOL

#19 Jun 18, 2007
well.....im not sure where all this is going.....i dont want to get to used to not having land to grow food.....

Hef

“the best”

Since: Dec 06

fraser island

#20 Jun 18, 2007
Want to see wrote:
Does this company offer tours to the public?
just show up.i'm sure they'll let you in if you buy some cc's.
Green Acres

AOL

#28 Jun 18, 2007
mojo wrote:
<quoted text>
they are European cucumbers which are seedless
What no American cucumbers?

Since: Feb 07

Pompano Beach, FL

#29 Jun 18, 2007
do these things even taste good or are they tasteless like the meats i waste money buying these days? ps: discovered that calif peaches are way better than georgia peaches (calif has the smooth skin, georgia has the furry skin). don't know why i added that tidbit but hey why not. people somehow always get politics into a benign article so i'm entitled to get my peach opinion in here. 2 foot cucumbers? oh my.
Bud

United States

#32 Jun 18, 2007
Steve, I think the point of the article is that agriculture has changed. Would it be better to have fields of marl constantly sprayed with water that evaporates and fertilizer that runs off into the canals. The article sounds like it is an efficient and environmentally sound way to approach agriculture. But who knows.
Bud

United States

#33 Jun 18, 2007
right wrong who cares wrote:
do these things even taste good or are they tasteless like the meats i waste money buying these days? ps: discovered that calif peaches are way better than georgia peaches (calif has the smooth skin, georgia has the furry skin). don't know why i added that tidbit but hey why not. people somehow always get politics into a benign article so i'm entitled to get my peach opinion in here. 2 foot cucumbers? oh my.
You see them in every suppermarket. 18 inches but skinny, each with it's own plastic "sleeve". People must like them.
Steve

Pompano Beach, FL

#34 Jun 18, 2007
Bud wrote:
Steve, I think the point of the article is that agriculture has changed. Would it be better to have fields of marl constantly sprayed with water that evaporates and fertilizer that runs off into the canals. The article sounds like it is an efficient and environmentally sound way to approach agriculture. But who knows.
Very true but, typical for a newspaper, they don't address the entire story. The article should also mention that they just built this big a** building that is supposedly not allowed because it is on protected agricultural land - as a Palm Beach county taxpayer I'd like to know why there is an exception to the rule. The building is being used like any other commercial office building but no commercial developer can build an office building on this type of land - I perceive that as not being right/fair
Dr Frankenfood

Savannah, GA

#36 Jun 18, 2007
Guess the reporter is too lazy to taste the cuke, or is afraid his objectivity would be compromised (!)No where in the story does it talk about how they taste compared to traditionally grown cukes. They probably taste like plastic, like those hydroponic tomatoes from that tropical paradise, Canada. It's more frankenfood, to go with your hormone enriched milk and meat. Cancer, anyone?
Steve

Pompano Beach, FL

#39 Jun 18, 2007
Hassenpheffer wrote:
NO you can not build an office building there.
Well it sure the heck looks like one so maybe they're calling it a tools hed after all?
Floridian

Hollywood, FL

#40 Jun 18, 2007
OOOh such innovation. Why do Americans think that they have thought up everything. They have been growing crops seriously like this in Europe for decades.

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