My Review Of The Beatles Revolver

My Review Of The Beatles Revolver

There are 40 comments on the Buzzle.com story from Jan 28, 2009, titled My Review Of The Beatles Revolver. In it, Buzzle.com reports that:

A review of The Beatles 1966 masterpiece Revolver. While 1967's Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band often gets credit as being The Beatles first real "rock album as art" statement, I think that overlooks the ...

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Since: Jan 09

Arlington Heights, IL

#2 Jan 29, 2009
Great comments. Too bad it's another copy n' paste. No thoughts of your own?

Since: Jan 09

Arlington Heights, IL

#3 Jan 29, 2009
Predictable ((yawn)))
Palo Alto Top Mod

France

#4 Jan 29, 2009
Using copy righted material without giving credit to it's source is a violation of Topix terms of service.
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Active Player

Knoxville, TN

#9 Jan 29, 2009
We play Taxman, and the guitar solo is truly masterful and very difficult for most guitarists because of the way it ignores the strong beats. The Eastern influence is obvious and surprising considering it came from McCartney, not Harrison, who was then beginning his study of the sitar. Emerick says Harrison was pretty ticked off about that, especially since it was on the best song he had written to date.

On this album we hear Lennon at his very best before his near fatal crash, deeper retreat into drugs, and Yoko's distracting influence caused him to be less involved in the studio. Emerick's studio wizardry, especially in the face of the relatively primitive gear he had to work with, is also outstanding. As you listen, pay close attention to the arrangements, which show Martin's enormous talent for refining the merely excellent into something superb and timeless. Note how every part has its own acoustic space, how the clean harmonic structures are throughout.

One of the advantages of the Beatle's status as the worlds best selling band was that EMI was willing to invest much more studio time in their albums than for anyone else and that even the most rigid of studio rules rarely applied to them. This extraordinary effort is one of the results of that flexibility, and I for one, am truly grateful.
Bubba the Saint

Ruckersville, VA

#10 Jan 29, 2009
Yea man I can really revolve around Revolver.Those British Blokes sure knew how to make cool music.And that guitar George he knew all chords.Ringo is awesome but underated.John and Paul just got better and better each album.George surprised both of them and proved he was able to write songs equal to theirs.Taxman is a prime example of George's ability to be Remembered as a great guitarist and a large part of the Beatle sound.
Active Player

Knoxville, TN

#11 Jan 29, 2009
Harrison was actually not the best guitarist of the band. Emerick describes him as ham-fisted, and recording sessions were sometimes tense as he struggled to get new lead parts right. When they decided which member would move over to bass after Sutcliffe announced that he was leaving the band, McCartney was the only one whose ego was not too inflated to make the move--lucky for everyone, since McCartney became such a great bassist. But as good a guitarist as Harrison became later on, he never really approached McCartney's ability. The Taxman solo is still regarded as one of rock's best by many working guitarists.
Greg

Greece

#12 Jan 29, 2009
Whatever Emerick says, in my opinion, George hadn't the freedom to explore his talent in the studio. Sir George and his band mates were suppressive on him. I agree that Paul is more talented, but not so much on the guitar. Harrison was the real musician of the Beatles. Always was searching for new sounds to expand his musicianship.
Active Player

Knoxville, TN

#14 Jan 29, 2009
Greg wrote:
Whatever Emerick says, in my opinion, George hadn't the freedom to explore his talent in the studio. Sir George and his band mates were suppressive on him. I agree that Paul is more talented, but not so much on the guitar. Harrison was the real musician of the Beatles. Always was searching for new sounds to expand his musicianship.
We have to remember that Harrison was very young and a bit insecure. His lack of confidence affected his playing, and he didn't really come into his own until the Beatles were starting to come unglued. All Things Must Pass shows all of the confidence and maturity that he eventually developed as a Beatle and the freedom that could only have come from the band's demise.

Emerick describes the Beatles as a closed group with an inner circle of two. Harrison has to have felt a sense of isolation, and I can see how that would have fueled his insecurity and a corresponding anger. I don't think Lennon and McCartney deliberately shut him out, but how could anyone keep up with their prolific out put and explosive growth.

For more personal reflections sorted chronologically, real The Beatles Anthology if you haven't already. It's an easy, if lengthy read.
Active Player

Knoxville, TN

#15 Jan 29, 2009
Oops. That's "read The Beatles Anthology."
Greg

Greece

#16 Jan 29, 2009
Dear Active Player, your analysis is very remarkable, however Lennon-McCartney's huge talent overshadowed everything. And yes, being the younger one, made it even harder for him. I think if he had had more space he would have made...more. I don't know what Geoff Emerick says, but I know for sure that Sir George had said:"I was rather beastly to George." Younger or not, he had ideas that rejected by the others.
Bubba the Saint

Seattle, WA

#17 Jan 29, 2009
Active Player wrote:
Harrison was actually not the best guitarist of the band. Emerick describes him as ham-fisted, and recording sessions were sometimes tense as he struggled to get new lead parts right. When they decided which member would move over to bass after Sutcliffe announced that he was leaving the band, McCartney was the only one whose ego was not too inflated to make the move--lucky for everyone, since McCartney became such a great bassist. But as good a guitarist as Harrison became later on, he never really approached McCartney's ability. The Taxman solo is still regarded as one of rock's best by many working guitarists.
I think the guitar solo on Abbey road they both do is one of their best just before the song the end.after carry that weight,George was a heck of lot better guitar player than John or Paul just listen to his slide playing John or paul couldn't touch it.But John and Paul could both out play George on piano hands down.So there you have it
Bubba the Saint

Seattle, WA

#18 Jan 29, 2009
When John heard George play for the first time he knew George had a special ability.Remember Paul took young George to John and said this guy can play raunchy note for note check him out.Then John said yea he will fit in great with our band and he did.Just listen to the solo on Nowhere man and the harmonics George hits at the end of his solo.Nobody would of thought of that except George.Jeff Lynne said George could play slide guitar better than anyone he knew but Clapton is right up there too.George was the first to play slide without it being the blues by the way.
Greg

Greece

#19 Jan 29, 2009
that rejected

...Were rejected, sorry.

awc

“Pepperland”

Since: Dec 06

Pepperland

#20 Jan 29, 2009
Revolver featured George and Ringo's first signature songs,and they would remain so for all their lives.
It was the middle point of their career, between the early years and later years.
Greg

Greece

#21 Jan 29, 2009
awc wrote:
Revolver featured George and Ringo's first signature songs,and they would remain so for all their lives.
It was the middle point of their career, between the early years and later years.
Yes, although I think "Rubber Soul" was this "turning point"; Not only for their career, but for Rock'n'Roll music in general. Revolver may be even better, artistically and lyrically, but Rubber Soul changed everything.
Wrench-Craft

Salzburg, Austria

#22 Jan 29, 2009
Active Player wrote:
<quoted text>
We have to remember that Harrison was very young and a bit insecure. His lack of confidence affected his playing, and he didn't really come into his own until the Beatles were starting to come unglued. All Things Must Pass shows all of the confidence and maturity that he eventually developed as a Beatle and the freedom that could only have come from the band's demise.
Emerick describes the Beatles as a closed group with an inner circle of two. Harrison has to have felt a sense of isolation, and I can see how that would have fueled his insecurity and a corresponding anger. I don't think Lennon and McCartney deliberately shut him out, but how could anyone keep up with their prolific out put and explosive growth.
For more personal reflections sorted chronologically, real The Beatles Anthology if you haven't already. It's an easy, if lengthy read.
On the Anthology, those early songs from Decca, sounded very off key,the guitar playing was very raw and simple.
But George did get better, not as good as Clapton,because he is the master, but George did play some good licks.
I beleive George became a better guitar player than Paul, and Ringo a better drummer than Paul.
Listen to Spies like us, it sounds good, but nowhere near that of Ringo.
Paul is a great bass player and of course a great piano player too.

awc

“Pepperland”

Since: Dec 06

Pepperland

#23 Jan 29, 2009
Greg wrote:
<quoted text>Yes, although I think "Rubber Soul" was this "turning point"; Not only for their career, but for Rock'n'Roll music in general. Revolver may be even better, artistically and lyrically, but Rubber Soul changed everything.
One thing about the Beatles is that each album made way for the next.
Help has a touch of Rubber Soul, just like Revolver has a touch of Rubber Soul.
And Sgt. Pepper has a touch of Revolver.
Beatles for sale has a touch of Help on it (I'm a loser).

awc

“Pepperland”

Since: Dec 06

Pepperland

#24 Jan 29, 2009
Wrench-Craft wrote:
<quoted text>
On the Anthology, those early songs from Decca, sounded very off key,the guitar playing was very raw and simple.
But George did get better, not as good as Clapton,because he is the master, but George did play some good licks.
I beleive George became a better guitar player than Paul, and Ringo a better drummer than Paul.
Listen to Spies like us, it sounds good, but nowhere near that of Ringo.
Paul is a great bass player and of course a great piano player too.
Great point, but I beleive David Gilmour is more masterful than Clapton.
And I beleive John was a better piano than Paul.
But I agree about George and Ringo's crafts.
Just my opinion.

awc

“Pepperland”

Since: Dec 06

Pepperland

#25 Jan 29, 2009
Beatles for sale has a touch of Help on it (I'm a loser).........

I meant to say Help has a touch of Beatles for sale on it (You've got to hide your love away).
Active Player

Knoxville, TN

#26 Jan 29, 2009
Bubba the Saint wrote:
<quoted text>I think the guitar solo on Abbey road they both do is one of their best just before the song the end.after carry that weight,George was a heck of lot better guitar player than John or Paul just listen to his slide playing John or paul couldn't touch it.But John and Paul could both out play George on piano hands down.So there you have it
According to Emerick, that solo was played by all three guitarists, and if you listen closely, you will hear how the amplifiers were carefully set to give each guitar its own distinct voice. Harrison's gift was to play solos that were within his limitations while fitting the moment perfectly. He had a great melodic sensibility, evident from the very beginning with his solo on Till There Was You. I understand that because that's also how I play.

You have to play guitar yourself to really understand it. Every guitarist has sets of chops that come easily and naturally and others that come only after hours of hard work. The lead player for our band plays circles around me, yet when he listens to some of my demos, he says, "I just don't understand that." He's always played straight-ahead rock with a smattering of country (loves Chet Atkins), and some styles of jazz leave him puzzled.

McCartney was still playing at an intermediate level when he met Harrison--still playing guitars strung for right-handed players so that the chords and scales were upside down. But he progressed from there at an astounding pace. Harrison was playing at a more advanced level, but his progress from there, while steady, was much more measured. Emerick was wrong, though, to call him ham-fisted. The young engineer underestimated him because of the impressive work coming from Lennon and McCartney and because of Harrison's quiet, unassertive nature.

The Beatles greatest strength, though, was their ability to collaborate to develop and perfect each tune. In looking at each member's strengths and weaknesses and focusing on the natural competition that fueled their creativity, it's easy to lose sight of that. In the end, they worked as a single unit and created new forms that set the bar for the many bands that have followed in thier wake.

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