Khamoshi 1969

Khamoshi 1969

There are 66 comments on the The Hindu story from Aug 18, 2008, titled Khamoshi 1969. In it, The Hindu reports that:

ROMANCE AND Dilemma Waheeda Rehman was extremely convincing in the role of nurse and Rajesh Khanna as a patient, while Dharmendra in a guest role was also impressive One of Waheeda Rahman's landmark movies, ...

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radzi

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

#1 Aug 18, 2008
Cut/Paste:
One of Waheeda Rahman’s landmark movies, Khamoshi was way ahead of its time in terms of its bold plot and courageous climax.
Frame by frame, the film was like a well-planned project that leaves its impact on the viewer by focusing on the inner turmoil of the protagonist — Radha (played by Waheeda). One rarely finds a Hindi film that revolves around a female character and rarer is the control while zooming in on the leading lady.
Khamoshi, a 1969 black-and-white Gitanjali Pictures release directed by Asit Sen (different from comedian Asit Sen) achieves both without any vain glorification. The film was originally made in Bengali in 1959 with the title Deep Jwele Jai in which director Asit Sen appeared in a short role, later played by Dharmendra in the Hindi remake.
The audience could not recognise Sen as it was a dark scene marked by the baritone voice of Hemant Kumar. Shot in Kolkata, the movie starts with Radha, a nurse at a mental asylum, becoming heart-broken after a patient — Dev Kumar (Dharmendra)— whom she cared for, pouring out her love and affection, leaves the hospital. Dev goes back to his family, wins back his estranged girlfriend and settles down to tie the knot. That brings out the inner battle between two aspects of Radha’s character — her professional necessity of resorting to “acting” to help a patient get well and her personal need to be in love with a man of her dreams. Suppression of her emotions leads to utter frustration, resulting in the wilting of her steely resolve. The asylum admits another acute-maniac in Arun Choudhury (Rajesh Khanna)— a man who has lost his mental balance after being ditched by his beloved. After initial refusal to take up the case of Arun, Radha finally says okay and leaves no stone unturned to get him on the path of recovery. In the process, Arun falls in love with Radha but the latter, despite being attracted to her new patient, finds it difficult to reciprocate as she always sees the reflection of Dev in Arun. Besides, the rude fact that she is only doing her job also poses a hurdle before her. As Arun departs from the asylum, Radha is struck by depression and turns into an acute-maniac herself. In the beginning, she starts as a nurse who is in charge of the patient belonging to room no. 24 and ends up being a patient in the same room while trying to explain to the world the emotional side of her character —“Maine acting nahin ki, maine kabhie acting nahin ki.” The climax is heart-wrenching!
Waheeda’s best shot
radzi

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

#2 Aug 18, 2008
cont.....

Waheeda is absolutely at her best in the film with subtle change of moods. Her eyes speak a thousand words. Without resorting to any fretting or ranting, she sails through like a huge ship on an ocean. That year, she was nominated in the Best Actress category at the Filmfare Awards but missed it narrowly. Rajesh Khanna and Nasser Hussain (as the head doctor of the asylum) also deliver solid performances, while Dharmendra’s is only a guest appearance. But the way Dharmendra’s presence has been treated tells us a lot about the director’s mature handling of the subject. The actor hardly faces the camera but leaves a lot of impact. His appearance in flashes depicts that he is the dream man of the protagonist whose dream remains unfulfilled. The film is technically sound and the dialogues are pithy and striking.
Innovative cinematography by Kamal Bose makes it a work of art. Bose later got the Filmfare Award for his exquisite work. Music, directed by Hemant Kumar, is another strong point of the movie. Gulzar’s golden words combined with melodious compositions weave the ultimate romantic atmosphere with a touch of reality. All the songs are among the all-time hits and the singers are extraordinary in their performances.
Be it “Tum pukar lo…tumhara intezaar hai” by Hemant Kumar, or the “Woh shaam kuch ajeeb thi” by Kishore Kumar or “Humne dekhi hai in aankhon ki mehekti khushboo” by Lata Mangeshkar, each one is just magic to the ears.
The movie is one of the gems that would always make the Hindi film industry feel proud of its past.
Y.B. SARANGI
Ald

Medan, Indonesia

#3 Aug 26, 2008
Nice story. Love to watch. I saw the sountrack in youtube, white and black film.
guest

Dallas, TX

#4 Nov 2, 2008
This film was also made in Telugu earlier in 1960, with the title "Chivaaaku Migiledi". Great actress "Savitri" acted in Radha's role. Her action is just terrific. She got lot of accolades for her action and also she won lot of awards.
radzi

Malaysia

#5 Nov 2, 2008
guest wrote:
This film was also made in Telugu earlier in 1960, with the title "Chivaaaku Migiledi". Great actress "Savitri" acted in Radha's role. Her action is just terrific. She got lot of accolades for her action and also she won lot of awards.
How about the actor doing Rajesh Khanna role? Was his acting comparable?
alok

Kolkata, India

#6 Jan 3, 2009
Rajesh is the life of the movie
Mustafa

Mumbai, India

#7 Jan 9, 2009
Released in 1970 and not 1969.It was a hit at the box office.
Suhan

Damascus, MD

#8 Jan 9, 2009
Here's an excerpt from an interview with Waheeda Rehman on 'Khamoshi'. The link to the original article is at the end.

"Question: Khamoshi, the story of a nurse who cures two patients in a mental institution, falling in love with both, and becoming mentally ill herself in the end, was a very unorthodox role to begin with. Did you expect it to be as successful as it was, and how emotionally taxing is it to do roles like that?

Answer: I saw the Bengali version with Suchitra Sen and was so moved by it, I would ask all my directors to remake it in Hindi, but they would say you always choose really heavy subjects and a film like will not do well at the box office. One day I asked Hemant Kumar after working with him for Bees Saal Baad, if he would give it a shot. He said if you will do it I will make it and the very next film that he made was Khamoshi. He even retained the same director Ashit Sen who had directed the Bengali version and he was excellent. I thoroughly enjoyed that role, but I was so emotionally involved with it that it really affected me deeply. After Khamoshi was completed I started shooting a movie with Nirupa Roy. We were both considered superb in emotional scenes, but we went through bottles and bottles of glycerin and just couldn’t emote. I realized then that the after effects of Khamoshi were still lingering and had drained me out. Unless you feel the pain you cannot show it and both of us were so flat, empty and drained out. She too had been doing several roles that had been emotionally draining. We had to call the shoot off.

I think the toughest scene, and one that took a lot out of me was where Rajesh Khanna keeps banging at the door asking her to open it. She is silent trying to control herself because the doctor has already reprimanded her and told her she cannot get involved with her patients, but deep within her she knows she is already involved and he is involved too and the silent struggle was very very tough to emote."

http://www.kavitachhibber.com/main/main.jsp...
alokc

Kakinada, India

#9 Jan 10, 2009
More than others - Kaka's acting is noticed due to freshness and being pure
Atul Maini

Karawang, Indonesia

#10 Jan 10, 2009
Kaka was good but Waheeda had the more footage which she portrayed beautifully.
In last few scenes she shows expressions of highest calibre.
alokc

Kakinada, India

#11 Jan 10, 2009
i found her jaded in the movie- seems she was over working then
Atul Maini

Karawang, Indonesia

#12 Jan 10, 2009
alokc wrote:
i found her jaded in the movie- seems she was over working then
Yes, it was the demand of her role ; black circles below eyes, tired look which she did wonderfully.
alokc

Kakinada, India

#13 Jan 10, 2009
No even in the earlier parts she looked tired - I may be wrong.
Atul Maini

Karawang, Indonesia

#14 Jan 10, 2009
alokc wrote:
No even in the earlier parts she looked tired - I may be wrong.
When did you see this movie last?
alokc

Kakinada, India

#15 Jan 10, 2009
2/3years ago
Atul Maini

Karawang, Indonesia

#16 Jan 10, 2009
See it again if gets a chance.Its really a lovely movie.
alokc

Kakinada, India

#17 Jan 10, 2009
i will try tom being sunday
Mustafa

Mumbai, India

#18 Jan 10, 2009
Can any one tell me what is the date of release mentioned before the movie begins.
atul

Pune, India

#19 Jan 10, 2009
Mustafa wrote:
Can any one tell me what is the date of release mentioned before the movie begins.
Mustfaji,just want to tell you,the date mentioned before the movie begins is date of censored, Date of released is different than date of censored certificate.
Suhan

Damascus, MD

#20 Jan 10, 2009
Waheeda's was the author-backed role and she was splendid. One of her best performances. Kaka was good no doubt but it was her film.

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