i was hoping you would list the fact

i was hoping you would list the fact

Posted in the Clifford Brown Forum

TIM SWARBRICK

San Jose, CA

#1 Jun 10, 2006
I STARTED THE FIRST EVER CLIFFORD BROWN TRIBUTE
http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/a...
I ALSO HAVE THE ORIGINAL NEWS JOURNAL COVERAGE OF THIS EVENT THAT HAPPENED 1967 1968.
THANKS
TIM
TIM SWARBRICK

San Jose, CA

#2 Jun 10, 2006
TIM SWARBRICK

San Jose, CA

#3 Jun 10, 2006
By CHRISTOPHER YASIEJKO
The News Journal
06/10/2005
This was years ago. 1967. Tim Swarbrick can't recall the date, or even the month, but he remembers why he did what he did.
This was before the DuPont Clifford Brown Jazz Festival came along, before organizers filled more than a week each year with free concerts in the name of Wilmington's grand trumpeter, who died in a car crash in 1956 at age 25.
This was one night in 1967, and another in 1968. Swarbrick, a New Jersey-born bassist who had played with orchestras led by the Dorsey brothers and Glen Miller, had moved here in 1964. His wife was from Wilmington, but Swarbrick had decided 10 years earlier that this was the place he wanted to be. Clifford's trumpet told him so.
Swarbrick, now 70 and living in Newark, taught bass and electric guitar at, among other places, Wilmington Music School. For his faculty recital -- instructors there periodically performed for their students to maintain credibility, a tradition that continues today -- Swarbrick decided to pay homage to Brown with a jazz quartet.
He invited Robert "Boysie" Lowery, who had played tenor saxophone alongside Dizzie Gillespie, Charles Mingus and John Coltrane. Boysie, another Wilmingtonian, had tutored Brown and "profoundly influenced" him. So said Dean Jenkins, now 74, who played piano that night in 1967 and wrote several of the songs the quartet played. Billy Davis, who studied with "Philly" Joe Jones, Ed Thigpen and Art Blakey, completed the group on drums.
The session lasted three or four hours and was played before mostly music students.
"I guess you could say it was a pretty good crowd," Jenkins said Wednesday from his Wilmington home.
In 1968, the show started with two songs written by Jenkins: "Mainline," described by The Morning News reviewer Tom Rettew as "an insistent melodic blues," and "Louella," which
Rettew tabbed "a ballad for Brown's sister."
One song, "Lolita," was described as "a semiswing, semi-Latin tune." Jenkins wrote it about Brown's niece.
"She used to come bug us when we were practicing," he said Wednesday.
Swarbrick first heard Brown's frenetic bebop in 1954, when he was stationed in California with the Air Force.
"A black friend was playing his sax in the shower -- a big shower -- with Clifford records playing," he said. "I wish I could remember who he was. Maybe he turned out to be famous.
"Anyway, even though I had played big band and marching band in high school, the moment I heard Clifford, my days singing Hank Williams Sr. were over."
As a teacher, Swarbrick would bring a record player to school and play Brown's albums. But Swarbrick couldn't understand the lack of awareness he perceived among the general population.
"The local jazz enthusiasts and players, mostly black, knew Clifford," he said. "And nobody else did."
Said Jenkins, "We felt like it was something that had to be done."
Other than a common purpose, there seems to be no direct connection between those performances and the 17th annual DuPont Clifford Brown Jazz Festival, which began June 3 and ends Sunday.
Tina Betz, Wilmington's director of cultural affairs, knew of Swarbrick's concerts and said similar events have played outdoors and at music schools over the years.
"Because Clifford Brown is a native son," Betz said, "it's not unusual to have tribute paid to him.
"I imagine that after his death there were concerts in honor of Clifford Brown. I don't know if any of those folks are still around or have any recollections to share, but it wouldn't surprise me if there were something that preceded Tim's.
"It's about the music. What he did was about the music. What others have done was about the music. It keeps evolving. So any effort that people made to continue what clearly is America's homegrown art is appreciated.
"We're glad he was there then, and we're glad to be here now."
Contact Christopher Yasiejko at or [email protected]
TIM SWARBRICK

San Jose, CA

#4 Jun 10, 2006
Jazz great honored years ago
Wilmington's Brown received tribute from musicians in 1960sBy CHRISTOPHER YASIEJKO
The News Journal
06/10/2005
This was years ago. 1967. Tim Swarbrick can't recall the date, or even the month, but he remembers why he did what he did.
This was before the DuPont Clifford Brown Jazz Festival came along, before organizers filled more than a week each year with free concerts in the name of Wilmington's grand trumpeter, who died in a car crash in 1956 at age 25.
TIM SWARBRICK

San Jose, CA

#5 Jun 10, 2006
This was one night in 1967, and another in 1968. Swarbrick, a New Jersey-born bassist who had played with orchestras led by the Dorsey brothers and Glen Miller, had moved here in 1964. His wife was from Wilmington, but Swarbrick had decided 10 years earlier that this was the place he wanted to be. Clifford's trumpet told him so.
Swarbrick, now 70 and living in Newark, taught bass and electric guitar at, among other places, Wilmington Music School. For his faculty recital -- instructors there periodically performed for their students to maintain credibility, a tradition that continues today -- Swarbrick decided to pay homage to Brown with a jazz quartet.
He invited Robert "Boysie" Lowery, who had played tenor saxophone alongside Dizzie Gillespie, Charles Mingus and John Coltrane. Boysie, another Wilmingtonian, had tutored Brown and "profoundly influenced" him. So said Dean Jenkins, now 74, who played piano that night in 1967 and wrote several of the songs the quartet played. Billy Davis, who studied with "Philly" Joe Jones, Ed Thigpen and Art Blakey, completed the group on drums.
The session lasted three or four hours and was played before mostly music students.
"I guess you could say it was a pretty good crowd," Jenkins said Wednesday from his Wilmington home.
In 1968, the show started with two songs written by Jenkins: "Mainline," described by The Morning News reviewer Tom Rettew as "an insistent melodic blues," and "Louella," which Rettew tabbed "a ballad for Brown's sister."
One song, "Lolita," was described as "a semiswing, semi-Latin tune." Jenkins wrote it about Brown's niece.
"She used to come bug us when we were practicing," he said Wednesday.
TIM SWARBRICK

San Jose, CA

#6 Jun 10, 2006
Swarbrick first heard Brown's frenetic bebop in 1954, when he was stationed in California with the Air Force.
"A black friend was playing his sax in the shower -- a big shower -- with Clifford records playing," he said. "I wish I could remember who he was. Maybe he turned out to be famous.
"Anyway, even though I had played big band and marching band in high school, the moment I heard Clifford, my days singing Hank Williams Sr. were over."
As a teacher, Swarbrick would bring a record player to school and play Brown's albums. But Swarbrick couldn't understand the lack of awareness he perceived among the general population.
"The local jazz enthusiasts and players, mostly black, knew Clifford," he said. "And nobody else did."
TIM SWARBRICK

San Jose, CA

#7 Jun 10, 2006
Said Jenkins, "We felt like it was something that had to be done."
Other than a common purpose, there seems to be no direct connection between those performances and the 17th annual DuPont Clifford Brown Jazz Festival, which began June 3 and ends Sunday.
Tina Betz, Wilmington's director of cultural affairs, knew of Swarbrick's concerts and said similar events have played outdoors and at music schools over the years.
"Because Clifford Brown is a native son," Betz said, "it's not unusual to have tribute paid to him.
"I imagine that after his death there were concerts in honor of Clifford Brown. I don't know if any of those folks are still around or have any recollections to share, but it wouldn't surprise me if there were something that preceded Tim's.
"It's about the music. What he did was about the music. What others have done was about the music. It keeps evolving. So any effort that people made to continue what clearly is America's homegrown art is appreciated.
"We're glad he was there then, and we're glad to be here now."

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