Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#304 Feb 21, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

The subject Love Begins With You can be attributed to John 3:16 "For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him shall not perish but have everlasting life."

Today is the Sabbath day, many of us will enter into the House of God for the purpose of worshiping and praising God. Many of us will carry unforgiveness, hatred, lust, bigotry, racism, idolatry, whoredom, filthy lucre, etc. Yet, love begins with you. You must first realize that Jesus Christ died and crucified the aforementioned sins that we may inherit eternal life. Eternal life is in Christ Jesus.

As we grace the pews or the Pulpit today, let us examine ourselves, and see what type of love we are carrying, is it eros (love because of family ties, bloodlines, dependency, etc.), is it phileo (love that brothers and sisters should have for each other as Christians in the churches, in their homes, on their jobs, and most of all in our hearts), or is it agape (love is spite of)? Jesus Christ made a one-time sacrifice for us by entering into the holies of holies, sprinkling His blood on the Mercy Seat, thereby opening the Covenant of Grace and Mercy. Love begins with you.

Greater love has no man, but to lay down his life for a friend. Jesus Christ is that friend that sticks closer than a brother. When trials and tribulations enter into your life, and you do not seem to know the way out, always look to the hills, whence cometh your help (love) and God is always there. Love begins with you.

None of us have experienced a whipping all night long, none of us have endured cruel mockings in public, none of us have been spat on, none of us has had a crown of thorns placed on our head, none of us have been pierced on our side, none of has had nails placed through our wrists and feet for someone else's disobedience to God. Yet, God though it not robbery to come in the likeness of sinful flesh to condemn sin in the flesh. What a loving God!

Remember, how can you love God, whom you have not seen, when you cannot love and serve your brother whom you do see? Some of us think that Jesus died only for Christians, not so. He died for all of humanity, but you must believe and allow the love that He showed on the Cross to enter into your heart. "Love begins with you"

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Dallas, TX

#305 Feb 26, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Psalm chapters 85 through 87.

Psalm 85 From the petition of verses 4-7 we learn that the occasion of this psalm was a time of national humiliation. Details are lacking but the people ask for God's anger to cease, for national revival, and for a new display of His mercy. This petition is preceded by a remembrance of the Lord's past favors (verses 1-3) and succeeded by a statement of the psalmist's certainty of impending deliverance (verses 8-13).

Psalm 86 This is one of the five psalms called prayers (see also chapters 17, 90, 102, 142). The spontaneous nature does not lend itself to a logical structure. The psalm actually constitutes a mosaic arrangement of quotations and allusions to other psalms (especially chapters 25-28; 54-57) and other books (Exodus, Deuteronomy, Isaiah, and Jeremiah). There is a brief reference to David's enemies (verse 14), but no specific historical situation is suggested. As a prayer, the psalm partakes of all the elements normally associated with prayer: petition (verses 1-7, 11, 14-17), adoration (verses 8-10), and thanksgiving (verses 12-13). In addition, the petitions are often backed up with motivations that encourage God to intervene. These range from the psalmist's innocence (verse 2) to God's gracious attributes (verse 15).

Psalm 87 This Song of Zion speaks prophetically of the time when Zion really will be the center of the universal kingdom of the Messiah. Zion is God's elect city (verses 1-3), a place where even the Gentiles are gathered (verses 4-6), and the source of new life in God's kingdom (verse 7).

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#306 Mar 5, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Psalm chapters 88 through 90.

Psalm 88 Certainly the gloomiest psalm in the entire collection, this psalm fails of the slightest ray of hope. Perhaps the author had experienced a tragedy like that of Job for which he had no explanation. In any case, the lack of hope is not because the psalmist has not prayed; rather, he has prayed earnestly and reminds the Lord that he has done so (verses 1, 2, 9, 13). The elements of the psalm consist of petition (verses 1, 2), lament (verses 3-9, 15-18), and a motivation for God to act (verses 10-14). In this last section eight rhetorical questions are addressed to God to reinforce the fact that the psalmist can only praise Him in this life. His death will serve no purpose.

Psalm 89 Like Psalm 73, which opens the third book of the psalms, this psalm also struggles with a universal problem among believers. Whereas Psalm 73 dealt with the prosperity of the wicked, Psalm 89 wrestles with the faithfulness of God to His promises. In particular, the promise in view is that of the Davidic covenant (2 Samuel 7:12-16), which the psalm mentions early (verses 3, 4) but later alleges that the Lord seems to have forgotten (verse 39). There are three distinct sections to the psalm: a review of God's past blessing and promise (verses 1-38), the lament of the present situation when God seems to have forsaken His Word (verse 39-47), and a petition that God would once again remember His covenant (verses 48-51). The third book psalms closes appropriately with a doxology (verse 52).

Psalm 90 This psalm is the only one written by Moses and thus is the oldest in the Psalter. From verses 7-12 we may judge that it was written at the end of the 38 years of wandering in the wilderness. It is a prayer for the new generation of Israelites who will enter the Promised Land. There are four parts to its message. First, Moses describes the eternality of God (verses 1,2). Then, in contrast, explores the brevity of man before God (verses 3-6). Four key comparisons are used:(1) A thousand years are like one day to God.(2) A thousand years are like a watch in the night (three hours). The implication of these comparisons is simple is simple: if a thousand years to God are like a day or a nightwatch, man's life is like a vapor.(3) Your life is like a particle swept away by a flood.(4) Your life is like a blade of grass that sprouts, fades, withers, and dies in a day. Moses was most qualified to speak of death, since he witnessed an entire generation perish in the wilderness. The third part of the psalm may be described as the condemnation of man (verses 7-10). Moses speaks here of the wilderness experience. Finally, he concludes with a petition (verses 11-17) in which he asks the Lord that the Israelites might be given God's work to do one more time, that is, the work of taking the Promised Land.

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#307 Mar 7, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Psalm chapters 91 through 94.

Psalm 91 The key word to describe this psalm is security. There are two distinct voices in the psalm, and each speaks to the trusting believer in the Lord. The first voice assures the faithful of God's protection (verses 1-13). The second voice is that of the Lord Himself who likewise pledges His watchcare (verses 14-16). An important caution is necessary here. The great promises of verses 3-13 should not be taken in absolute sense. One may not be presumptuous in applying them--satan has already suggested that (Matthew 4:6, 7). Rather, the believer must recall that deliverance still has to be the will of God and that even if harm should come, he can still be secure (Luke 21:16 with 21:18 and Romans 8:28 with 8:35).

Psalm 92 This one of the few psalms with a liturgical superscription. Its specific connection with the Sabbath day is not explained, but it probably lies in its picture of the wicked vanquished (verses 4-9) and the righteous exalted (verses 10-15), a harbinger of an eternal Sabbath rest (Hebrews 4:9-11). The introduction is a call to praise the Lord, both morning and evening (verses 1-3).

Psalm 93 This second psalm of the divine kingdom (47; 96-99) speaks prophetically of the time when the Lord will rule on the earth in the person of the Messiah. The Lord's kingship is described (verses 1, 2), revealed in nature (verses 3, 4) and present in His house, the temple (verse 5).

Psalm 94 This psalm is a prayer for God's judgment to fall. It is in the spirit of the petition, "Thy kingdom come," a cry that God's righteous rule be established over all men, especially the wicked. The introduction (verses 1, 2) briefly sets forth the psalmist's desire; the lament (verses 3-7) describes how the wicked are acting; the appeal (verses 8-11) is offered directly to the wicked for their self-correction; and finally, the confidence section (verses 12-23) expresses the psalmist's trust and certainty that the Lord will in fact judge.

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#308 Mar 14, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Psalm chapters 95 through 99.

Psalm chapter 95

The change of voice in verse 7 may well indicate that this psalm was sun antiphonally. First, the people offer a hymn that serves as a call to worship and prayer (vv. 1-7a); then the priest or prophet answers with a warning that the worshipers must not fall prey to hardness of heart as did their ancestors (vv. 7b-11). This ever-present tendency to harden one’s heart is likewise applicable to God’s revelation in Christ, as the author of Hebrews observed (Heb. 3:7-11).

Psalm chapter 96

Psalms 96-99 are linked together with the expression the Lord reigneth, except for Psalm 98 which has “the Lord, the King”(v. 6). As such, they conclude the body of the divine kingdom psalms (see also 47, 93) which speak of Messiah’s reign over all the earth. The use of a similar expression,“Thy God reigneth,” in Isaiah 52:7 shows that the time of fulfillment for this prophecy is when Isaiah’s “Servant of the Lord” is exalted. This can take place only during the reign of Christ on the earth. This particular psalm, apart from the description of the King in verses 4-6, is composed of three calls: two calls for universal submission to the Lord’s kingship (vv. 1-3, 7-10) and one call to creation to praise the Lord (vv. 11-13).

Psalm chapter 97

This enthronement psalm reveals the Lord’s kingship (vv. 1-6) and enunciates its effect on both the wicked (v.7) and righteous (vv. 8-12).

Psalm chapter 98

The coming reign of the Lord on the earth is here celebrated as an event of great joy. Therefore, three groups are called upon to rejoice: God’s people (vv. 1-3), the whole earth (vv. 4-6), and all of nature (vv. 7-9).

Psalm chapter 99

The final psalm of the divine kingdom is composed of three stanzas, each followed by a call to worship (vv. 3,5,9). The first stanza describes the King’s greatness (vv. 1,2); the second, His justice (v. 4); and the third, His forgiveness (vv. 6-8).

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#309 Mar 19, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Psalm chapters 100 through 102.

Psalm 100 The word praise in the superscription is actually the word thanksgiving or, more specifically, thank-offering. It was one psalm that accompanied a "thank-offering" (Leviticus 7:12) that one presented when God has especially answered a prayer or given a great deliverance. The psalm contains a command to serve (verses 1-3) and a command to praise (verses 4, 5). Each section is in turn divided into three calls and three causes. There are three calls to serve, make a joyful noise (verse 1), serve the Lord (verse 2), and come before (verse 2); and three causes for serving, the Lord is God, he hath made us, we are his people (verse 3). Likewise, there are three calls to praise, enter his gates, be thankful, bless his name (verse 4), followed by three causes for praise, the Lord is good, his mercy is everlasting, his truth endureth (verse 5).

Psalm 101 This psalm describes the perfect king. It expresses David's own aims but, at the same time, is a picture of Christ, his descendant, who will in fact fulfill this ideal picture. The ideal king sings to the Lord (verse 1), keeps his personal life pure (verses 2-4), and administers social justice (verses 5-8).

Psalm 102 Though the author of this psalm is anonymous, he speaks for the afflicted of all ages who must rely totally on God for relief. The answer to the psalmist's grief is not, in this case, direct divine intervention to alter his situation; rather, the psalmist's own reflection on the unchanging nature of God in His dealings with men soothes his troubled mind. After his introductory petition (verses 1, 2), the psalmist voices his lament (verses 3-11). His relief comes when he begins verse 12 dramatically with the words but thou, O Lord, then expounds on the immutability and compassion of the Lord (verses 12-22). Finally, the remaining section heightens the contrast between frail men and unchanging God by bringing both themes together (verses 23-28). These statements about God's unchanging nature can just as easily be applied to the Lord Jesus Christ, the believer's refuge today, as the author of the Book of Hebrews applies them (Hebrews 1:10-12).

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#310 Mar 21, 2010
Dear US Citizens:
As most of you know I am a honorably discharged Vietnam Veteran and today I would like to address some of the horrors that I endured as a combat soldier. First of all, enduring the transformation from citizen to soldier during my BCT (Basic Combat Training), AIT (Advanced Infantry Training) and Jump School.
We had instructors known as DI's (Drill Instructors) who were hard core, their blood type was OD Green and I believe that their religion was infantry. I was only eighteen years old when I entered into the mililtary service. I felt I was in good shape until I met those drill instructors.
I would like to enlighten you as to the payscale. Private E1 ($78 per month), Private E2 ($89 per month), PFC (Private First Class,$109 per month). I am not complaining because the World War I and World War II and the Korean Conflict Veterans received less. However, Uncle Sam, you still owe us.
Secondly, I would like to address my arrival in Vietnam. I arrived in Vietnam in 1966 and returned to the US in 1968. My MOS was 11B10-1P-1R (Airborne Infantry). My Unit was the 173rd Airborne Brigade and the 25th Infantry Division. The average age of the combat veterans was 19. At that time we were not allowed voting privileges. As combat soldiers in Vietnam, We endured 110 degree weather in the shade, dense jungle, monsoon season, booby traps, hostile villagers and most of all, if you were in my unit you encountered NVA (North Vietnamese Army) well equipped and seasoned troops.
From the perspective of being a soldier and the logistics involved, we really were fighting China and Russia. The AK-47 is a Russian designed Chinese built assault rifle. There was no comparison between the M-16 and the AK-47. Many troops died trying to unjam the M-16. I myself carried the M-60 which I was allowed to carry a fifthy round burst in the weapon. Can you imagine hooking your Ammunition Belt into that fifty round burst while being fired on or receiving RPGs (rocket propelled grenades) and being insulted by the enemy especially if you were African American. Such taunting was "hey, Black GI we same same. You no free in your own country, why are you here?". Having to enter into tunnels, enduring red ants, King Cobras, Leeches, Jungle Rot (foot disease), poor diets (one hot meal a month), poor hygiene (maybe a hot shower every 6 months) and to see your comrades blown apart, shot and some court marshalled and come home and endure flashbacks and not being able to readjust to civilian life. All these things are horrors of war.
Thirdly, to come home and be labelled baby killers. To receive no medical attention regarding Post Tramactic Stress Disorder (unheard of at the time). No treatment for exposure to Agent Orange which was used to kill typography. All these things are horrors of war.
Now I address the forgotten part. I was highly insulted when a ticker taped parade was given for the Iranian hostages upon their return to US soil while we received, burning of flags by the public and being labelled as the army that was strung out on drugs. One only needs to visit the veterans administration and take inventory regarding the programs that veterans are allowed to receive. One would say, this is the most ungrateful country regarding its servicemen who fought and served in any war.
Oh how we have forgotten those that gave the supreme sacrifice by dying. Once a year we give a parade and then turn our heads away when it involves those that are still alive and suffering from the tramactic experience of war. Oh how this country has forgotten us and disrespected us, yet I am very proud to say, I am a Vietnam Veteran that God choose to use.
Fellow citizens this is not a criticism of the US Army but a wake up call to those who can make a difference in the lives of the US Veteran. Have you forgotten us?
Yours in Jesus Christ,
Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#311 Mar 21, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Psalm chapters 103-105.

Psalm 103 This hymn is one of the greatest praise psalms in the entire collection. The first section (verses 1-5) finds the psalmist expressing his intention to praise God for all his benefits (verse 2). Then with five verbs he enumerates specifically these benefits: who forgiveth...who healeth (verse 3), who redeemeth...who crowneth (verse 4), who satisfieth (verse 5). All of these actions speak of spiritual blessings, though physical benefits may be included. The next section (verses 6-19), which speaks of God's character, contains a veritable catalog of the benevolent attributes of God: merciful, gracious, slow to anger, plenteous in mercy (verse 8). These are amply illustrated in an attempt to convey their vastness: the greatness of His mercy (as the heaven is high, verse 11), the greatness of His removal of our sins (as far as the east is from the west, verse 12), and the greatness of His compassion (as a father pitieth his children, verse 13). Finally, in the conclusion the psalmist returns to call that he gave himself at the outset, but this time he widens it to include all created beings and works (verses 20-22).

Psalm 104 A truly joyful hymn of praise to the Creator, this hymn (along with Job 38 and 39 and Psalms 8 and 29) forms a divine poetic commentary on the Creation. The introduction to the psalm is a brief call to praise (verse 1a). The body of the psalm (verses 1b-30) expounds on the majesty of God's creative work as few psalms do: He is infinite (verses 1b-4); He created and established the earth's land and seas (verses 5-9); He cares for the animal kingdom by giving food and drink (verses 10-18); He established the heavenly bodies as regulatory agents (verses 19-23); He created the seas and all its contents (verses 24-26); and all living creatures are completely dependent on Him (verses 27-30). The conclusion (verses 31-35) summarizes the message of the psalm and calls upon all men to praise the Lord of creation, an act of devotion the psalmist had already demanded of himself (verses 1, 35).

Psalm 105 One of two historical psalms (see chapter 78), this psalm traces the history of Israel for its didactic value in the psalmist's own day. It could also be classified as a hymn of praise since it includes the characteristic threefold content: a call to praise (verses 1-6), a cause for praise (verses7-41), and a conclusion (verses 42-45). The call to praise is unmistakable with its 11 imperatives directed toward God's people: give thanks, call upon, make known, sing, talk, and so on. The cause for praise constitutes a brief historical survey of what the Lord did for Israel in the past: He made an unconditional covenant with Abraham and reaffirmed it to Issac and Jacob (verses 7-11). He protected Joseph and used him to sustain His people (verses 12-22). He delivered His people from Egypt (verses 23-38). He provided for them in the wilderness (verses 39-41). In light of such a faithful, promise-keeping God, the psalmist concludes with a summary of God's blessings (the Abrahamic covenant, the Exodus, and the Conquest) and a appropriate call to praise (verses 42-45).

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Dallas, TX

#312 Mar 29, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Psalm chapters 106 and 107.

Psalm 106 This psalm is one of national lament, though it might also be classified as a historical psalm (chapters 78, 105). Like Psalm 105 it traces the history of Israel, but for a different purpose. In the former psalm the emphasis was on God's grace and faithfulness; in this psalm it is on the people's faithlessness and the Lord's justice.Verse 47 has been interpreted to imply that the setting of the psalm was the Babylonian captivity. This is not necessarily true, however, because the reference is quite general, and there were many periods when the Israelites were oppressed by the heathen. The psalm may be divided into three key sections. First, there is a call to praise (verses 1-5). Second, a confession of Israel's past sins (verses 6-46) takes up the bulk of the psalm. In this part, after an introductory identification of present-day sins with the past (verse 6), the psalmist traces a history of rebellion and unbelief on the part of God's people. These occasions of disbelief included the Exodus (verses 7-12), the wanderings in the wilderness (verses 13-23), the events at Kadesh-barnea (verses 24-27; Numbers 13:32; 14:41), the encampment at Shittim (verses 28-31), and occurrences within the Promised Land itself (verses 32-46). Finally, the psalmist concludes with a twofold petition, save us...gather us, with a twofold purpose, to give thanks...and to triumph (verse 47). This last psalm in the fourth book of Psalms ends with the now familiar doxology (verse 48).

Psalm 107 Verses 2 and 3 need not be taken as a reference to the Babylonian exile. They most likely refer to the fact that God's people are viewed as collected from all worldly powers into their present position as His chosen people. The fact that all four directions are mentioned supports this idea, since Babylon itself lay to the east. After an initial call to praise (verses 1-3), the psalmist lists the various types of distresses from which the Lord rescues His people (verses 4-32). These include: redemption from wandering (verses 4-9), from prisons (verses 10-16), from deathly psychological misery (verses 17-22), and from stormy seas (verses 23-32). This survey is punctuated with a refrain intended to epitomize the reaction these acts of redemption should elicit: Oh that men would praise the Lord (verses 8, 15, 21, 31). The next section constitutes a miniature survey of Israel's history, though the allusions are admittedly quite vague (verses 33-41): the desolation of Egypt and the Red Sea (verses 33, 34), the miraculous provision during the wilderness experience (verse 35), the conquest of Canaan (verses 36-38), and the vicissitudes of life in the Promised Land (verses 39-41). The purpose of this section is to drive home the truth that God is faithful and gracious to His people. Finally, the conclusion of the psalm (verses 42, 43) applies the moral of the story to its readers: a knowledge of God's steadfastness and love will cause rejoicing among the righteous, silence among the wicked, and meditation among the wise.

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jamaica, NY

#313 Apr 2, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we study of the Book of Psalm chapters 108-109.

Psalm 108 This psalm is composed of fragments from two other psalms. The first section, verses 1-5, is taken from 57:7-11; the second section, verses 6-13, is taken from 60:5-12, with little change in the wording of either fragment. Though taken from psalms of individual lament (chapter 57) and national lament (chapter 60), the present psalm is composed of the most positive sections of confidence in both. The resulting work is a psalm of victory that only briefly alludes to the nation's lament, namely, their ever-present enemies (verses 12-13).

Psalm 109 This psalm constitutes the most vivid example of imprecatory prayer found in all the Psalter. Such petitions for retributive justice have posed a theological problem: How can a man who claims to trust in the Lord (verses 21-31) pray such curses on his enemies as those found in verses 6-20? Several answers may be offered for this problem. First, there is a legitimate righteous indignation against sin. God Himself possesses this attribute and Jesus indirectly commanded it when He instructed the disciples to pray "Thy kingdom come." The coming of God's kingdom includes the destruction of the wicked. Second, the curses used here are actually a prayer that places the matter into the hands of a just and holy God. Third, Peter quotes both Psalm 69 and Psalm 109 in Acts 1:20 and attributes both references to the Holy Spirit. Fourth, the psalmist is so identified with God that he has the mind of God: the psalmist's enemies are likewise at enmity with God. The content of the psalm may be analyzed as follows: the psalmist's lament and declaration of innocence (verses 1-5), the catalog of curses that he prays will fall on his enemies (verses 6-20), and his plea that God will give mercy and protection (verses 21-31).

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Dallas, TX

#314 Apr 4, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today we study the Book of Psalm chapters 110 and 111.

Psalm 110 This royal psalm is also messianic. It is the only messianic psalm with no contemporary reference to David or another. Though assailed by critics, its Davidic authorship, divine inspiration, and messianic interpretation are all assumed by Jesus and the New Testament writers. It ranks as the Psalm most quoted in the New Testament (Matthew 22:44; Mark 12:36; Luke 20:42, 43; Acts 2:34, 35; Hebrews 1:13; 5:6; 7:17, 21) with many additional allusions. The content of the psalm may be analyzed under three headings: Sovereign King (verses 1-3), Eternal Priest (verse 4), and Victorious Warrior (verses 5-7). The initial double reference to the Lord created interpretive problems in Jesus' day (see Matthew 22:41-45), but only for those who refused to accept His deity. The answer is simple: the first word Lord is in capital letters, indicating that it is a reference to Yahweh, the personal name of God; second word Lord contains only a capital "L," indicating that it is the Hebrew word Adonai, meaning "Master"; the word "my" refers of course to David himself. Though the Messiah is David's son (2 Samuel 7:14-16), He is also David's Adonai; therefore, Messiah must be divine as well. The implication of the first three verses is striking: God and Messiah rule the the earth as partners. Verse 4 establishes the priesthood of the Messiah, though not until Hebrews 5 and 7 is this office explained. not only is the Messiah a unique King-Priest, He is also a warrior (verses 5-7) who will execute judgment and thus lift up the head (verse 7) in conquest.

Psalm 111 An acrostic psalm, this poem uses two clauses for each verse ,except for the last verse which has three, for a total of 22 clauses, each beginning with a consecutive letter of the Hebrew alphabet (with its 22 letters). Though such acrostic poems are rarely subject to logical outlining, this one is a psalm of praise and contains the characteristic call to praise (verse 1), cause for praise (verses 2-9), and a concluding exhortation to praise (verse 10).

I am wishing everyone a Blessed Easter.

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jamaica, NY

#315 Apr 5, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as your read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Psalm chapters 112 through 115.

Psalm 112 This psalm is another acrostic and is written in the same 10-verse format as the preceding one. The contrast between the righteous man and the wicked man marks this poem out as a wisdom psalm. Almost all of the problem, however, is taken up with the good fortunes of the righteous man (verses 1-9), with only one verse dedicated to the observation of the wicked's destruction (verse 10).

Psalm 113 Psalms 113-118 have been traditionally linked in Jewish worship with the great feasts of Passover and Tabernacles. At Passover, for example, Psalms 113 and 114 are sung before the meal and 115-118 after it. How far back these traditions go is unknown, but the connection of such hymns with the Passover is mentioned in the New Testament (Matthew 26:30; Mark 14:26). The content of Psalm 113 is simple. There is a call to praise the Lord (verses 1-3) because He is great (verses 4-6) and because He cares for the poor and needy (verses 7-9).

Psalm 114 A highly poetic description of the Exodus, this psalm emphasizes both God's power displayed (verses 3-6) and His provisions supplied (verse 8). The God of Israel's deliverance (verses 1, 2) is still their God (verse 7), the implication being that He can still unfurl His power. The world must therefore take notice.

Psalm 115 The note of confidence is so strong in this psalm that is should be classified as a psalm of national confidence. The message of the psalm could be aptly summarized in three ideas: honor the Lord, because, in contrast to idols, He alone is God (verses 1-8); trust the Lord, because He will help you (verses 9-11); praise the Lord, because He is worthy (verses 12-18).

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jamaica, NY

#316 Apr 8, 2010
May the Love of God lead this country back to the road of righteouness. It is my sincere prayer that Almighty God will send us leaders that will speak Truth and Lived the life before God and man.

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#317 Apr 17, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as your read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Psalm chapters 116 and 117.

Psalm 116 This psalm is one of the most personal of all the tanksgiving psalms (note the many occurrences of the personal pronoun "I"). The psalm is composed of three distinct parts: frist, a declaration of praise (vv. 1,2)); next the psalmist recalls his troubles and how the Lord delivered him from them (vv.3-11); finally, he concludes with a description of what he will offer in thanksgiving for what the Lord has done (vv. 12-19). Note that his thanksgiving will be given publicly, as the law required.

Psalm 117 Well known as the shortest chapter in the Bible, this little psalm contains a great message. Though some have denied it an independant existence, attaching it to Psalm 116, Psalm 117 has all three elements of the hymn of praise: a call to praise (v.1), a cause for praise (v. 2a, b) and a conclusion which, in this case, is a simple praise ye the Lord (v. 2c). The fact that the nations of people (lit., "peoples") are addressed in verse 1 makes this psalm the only one in the Psalter addressed in its entirety to the Gentile world. Its evangelistic mood was still baffling to some of Paul's readers. This is one of four passages that Paul quotes from the Old Testament, in Romans 15, to prove that God is interested in saving Gentiles.



Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#318 Apr 17, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Psalm chapter 118.

Psalm 118 This psalm was a particular favorite of Martin Luther. A national psalm of thanksgiving, it apparently accompanied a procession into the temple, probably that of a thanksgiving offering. The changes of a person in the psalm indicate that it may have been recited antiphonally, though the following explanation is admittedly conjectural. First, there is an exchange before the door of the temple (verses 1-20). The first four verses are a sort of invocation, probably delivered by a priest. Next, in verses 5-8 the king leads the people in worship with himself as the speaker, though interrupted at times by antiphonal refrains offered by the people (verses 8, 9, 10-12). In verse 19 the king turns to the doorkeeper and asks for entrance. The doorkeeper responds with a description of those who may enter (verse 20, retranslating as a statement: "This is the gate of the Lord"). The remainder of the psalm takes place within the temple (verses 21-29). Again there are apparently three speakers. First, the king declares God has saved him (verse 21). The people respond in a joyful manner to this affirmation (verses 22-24). The employment of the stone imagery to represent the Davidic king is echoed messianically throughout the New Testament (Matthew 21:42; Mark 12:10, 11; Luke 20:17; Acts 4:11; 1 Peter 2:7). Next, the priests deliver a petition and a blessing (verses 25, 26). The final three verses portray the presentation of the actual sacrifice: the priests command it (verse 27), the king responds with praise (verse 28), and the people seal the ceremony with the same liturgical formula with which it began (verse 29).

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#319 May 30, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we will study the Book of Malachi chapters 1 through 4.

1:1 For burden (Hebrew masa', "burden," "load," or "thing lifted up"): See the note on Habakkuk 1:1-4

1:2-5 Yet I loved Jacob, And I hated Esau has caused concern to many. This expression involves the use of a Hebrew idiom. If a father had two sons and made one heir, he was said to love the one he had made his heir and to hate the other whom he had not made an heir. The love and hate spoken of here are not related to the emotions; they are related to the will of God. The words challenge Israel to recognize the responsibilities inherent in its privileged position.

2:4-7 The covenant referred to in this context is the "covenant of an everlasting priesthood" (Numbers 25:10-13), given to Phinehas, and to the covenant made with Levi and his descendants, because of their faithfulness to God in the midst of general infidelity (Exodus 32:25-29; Deuteronomy 33:8-11). Therefore, it represents a call to a genuine priesthood.

2:10 The reference here is not to God's universal Fatherhood of all humanity, but to His unique relation to Israel.

2:11-14 Married the daughter of a strange god: The problem of intermarriage with the heathen was further complicated by some of the men divorcing their Hebrew wives to marry heathen women. Therefore, both intermarriage and divorce are condemned.

3:1 My messenger plays on the name of the prophet. It does not refer to a heavenly messenger. Neither does it refer to a spiritual being nor to the Angel of the Lord, but to an earthly messenger of the Lord, the same one called Elijah in 4:5, 6. This clause is quoted a number of times in the New Testament (Matthew 3:3, 11:10; Mark 1:2, 3; Luke 1:76; 3:4; 7:26, 27; John 1:23) and is uniformly applied to John the Baptist, the only prophet besides Jesus who was the subject of prophecy.

3:7-12 These Israelites have done what no man should presume to attempt, namely, to defraud God in tithes and offerings. The payment of tithes and offerings was a recognition of their subjection to God and the He owned them and all that they had. To withhold the tithe is to renounce the sovereign authority of God and to be guilty of the same sin as Lucifer in the beginning. Pour you out a blessing: The blessings come not because God received His due portion, but because in giving the tithe believers put themselves in the place of proper obedience and subjection to God. Tithing was clearly commanded in the Old Testament and served as the minimum standard for giving in the New Testament. See Matthew 6:1-4 in the Sermon on the Mount, where true spirituality exceeds the outward demands of the Law.

4:1-6 The coming day is the day of the Lord (or the Great Tribulation), which is in view as the birth pangs for the millennial kingdom. Sun of righteousness is a figurative representation of the Messiah. Moses represents the law and Elijah represents the prophets. Both of them appeared at the transfiguration of Christ (Matthew 17:3). The Old Testament ends with the promise of the coming of Elijah, which the New Testament identifies as John the Baptist (Matthew 3:3; Mark 1:3; Luke 3:4; John 1:23). John's own disclaimer (John 1:21) was simply a denial that he was literally Elijah. Jesus, on the other hand, clearly stated that John the Baptist came "in the spirit and power of Elijah" (Matthew 11:14; 17:10-13; Mark 9:11-13). Malachi's promise is quoted by the angel in Luke 1:17 as referring to the ministry of John the Baptist as the forerunner of the Messiah. Therefore, the Old Testament ends in anticipation of the coming of the Messiah and His prophetic forerunner, John the Baptist, who appears in the likeness of Elijah.

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#320 May 30, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we will study the Book of Zephaniah chapters 1 through 3.

1:1 The prophet's genealogy shows his royal relationship to Hizkiah (Hezekiah), the godly king of Judah who had died in 686 B.C. Josiah was Judah's last godly king, during whose reign the Law was rediscovered in 621 B.C.

1:2-6 Six groups are singled out for judgment:(1) the remnant of Baal:(2) the idolatrous priests; (3) them that worship the host of heaven upon the housetops; (4) them that worship and that swear by the Lord, and that swear by Malcham, devotees of a syncretistic worship system; (5) them that are turned back from the Lord; and (6) those that have no sought the Lord. Baal was the Canaanite storm god often worshiped by idolatrous Israelites (Jeremiah 7:9). Chemarim was an honorable Canaanite term for their priests but may translate "idolatrous priests" in Hebrew and is used here in to designate non-Levitical priests (2 Kings 18:4-6; 23:4-15). Worship of the stars of heaven upon the housetops refers to Sabaism here identified with Malcham. This practice was introduced by the ungodly king Manasseh (2 Kings 21:3-5) and was associated with the worship of the "queen of heaven" (Jeremiah 7:18; 44:17).

1:7, 8 In Zephaniah the day of the Lord refers to the impending Babylonian invasion of Judah and to the destruction of Jerusalem. He pictures the victims of this conquest as the princes (nobles), the king's sons (royalty), and the wealthy who wear imported garments. Zephaniah's prophecy was fulfilled when Nebuchadnezzar destroyed Jerusalem in 586 B.C., slew the sons of Zedekiah (Josiah's youngest son), blinded Zedekiah, and led him captive to Babylon (2 Kings 25:7).

1:9-13 Those that leap on the threshold probably are the priests of Dagan who would not step on the place where he had fallen (1 Samuel 5:5). They may also be creditors who crossed over the threshold of their debtors (Deuteronomy 24:10, 11). The fish gate was situated on the northern side of the city. It may have derived its name from nearby fish markets that sold catches from the Sea of Galilee. The Maktesh was the part of Jerusalem situated in the Tyropoean Valley. The merchant people (Hebrew kenaan, also a word for "Canaanite") indicates they transacted their business like Canaanites and Phoenicians.

2:1-12 Zephaniah calls upon the meek of the earth to seek the Lord. Then he lists the nations that Babylon will conquer. The cities of the Philistines (Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, and Ekron) will be destroyed. Moab will be reduced to rubble. The Ethiopians will be slain by the sword.

2:13-15 Zephaniah also predicts the fall of Nineveh, the capital of Assyria. The great city fell to the Chaldeans of Babylon in 612 B.C. The ancient metropolis will be reduced to the habitation of wild animals. Cormorant (qaat) refers to a pelican or unclean bird. Bittern (qipod) refers to a porcupine or hedgehog.

3:9 Serve him with one consent (Hebrew shekem, "shoulder") is a figure drawn from the use of a yoke whereby two animals could be linked together and serve as one. From this verse until the end of the prophecy, Zephaniah foresees the blessings of the millennial kingdom.

3:13-15 For the fall of Assyria, see the notes on 2 Kings 23:28, 29; Nahum 3:7-10.

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#321 May 30, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

This email is being sent to parents, teachers, politicians, policemen, judges, homemakers, clergy, etc. My question to all of us is Are We a Christian Nation?

I ask that question because of some observations that I have made while sitting on the train. I noticed a group of young men and women, they were wearing tattoos on their necks, arms, chests, legs, and other parts I need not mention. I base my objection to tattoos on the scripture "Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and he that defileth that temple, him God will destroy."

Well, the conversation contained profanity, words that should not be spoken at all. I base my objection to their conversation on this scripture "It is not what goes into a man that defileth him, but what comes out." When you speak perverseness from your lips, everyone around you becomes contaminated. There is a scripture that states "The power of life and death is in the tongue," and some people's tongue is always wagging and speaking against God's Word.

As clergy, I am asking each one of you that is in the aforementioned position, to respond to this article. We are losing our children to the devices of the devil, but yet, there are churches on each corner. What happened to "One can put a thousand (devils), and two ten thousand to flight." It is with a humble spirit that I ask Are We a Christian Nation?

Training begins at home, are you training your child in the ways of God, or are you allowing them, as the young people say, express their freedom? Where the spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty.

I remind you that the youth of today will be the leaders of tomorrow, will they be Christians or heathens? I ask the question again, Are We a Christian Nation? I recall a quote from the Pledge of Allegiance "One nation, under God, Indivisible with liberty and justice for all." Yet, discrimination exists, hate crimes are being committed, murders are on the increase, the economy is failing, banks are taking people's homes, and casting them into the street, whether they have children or not.

The Bible tells me "The love of money is the root of all evil." Wall Street (Stock Market) needs to examine this portion of scripture, when they are dealing with their clients. Again, Are We a Christian Nation?

Please respond if you care.

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jamaica, NY

#323 Jun 4, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the precious name of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. It is my sincere prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today I would like to discuss with you the subject "Act of God".

In the book of Genesis, God allowed Joseph to be taken captive and to be enslaved down in Egypt. There was a purpose for that. As Joseph stated to his brothers, "you meant it for evil, but God meant it for good that the world might be saved. If you recall, Pharaoh had a dream about seven fatted cows and seven lean cows, seven ripe ears of corn and seven blighted ears of corn which meant that there would be seven years of plenty and seven years of famine. Joseph interpreted that dream for Pharaoh and became second in command in the Egypt.

Because of his brothers sin, they were led to Egypt by God and when the Pharaoh that knew Joseph died, the new Pharaoh enslaved the Hebrew children. Thus began the repayment for their treatment of Joseph. God punished the whole tribe of Israel because of their sin and because Pharaoh touched them, God punished Egypt as well.

I guess you say, brother preacher what does that have to do with the act of God? Let us examine the book of Revelation, chapter 8:8-11 concerning the power that was given to the angels.

We are now facing a crisis. Flooding in the Midwest, contaminated food, earthquakes, fires, volcanic activity and the worst oil spill in the history of the world. All these things are spoken of in these three verses of Revelation. Take note, Wormwood. One Third of the water was poisoned. Many men died and many will die because of these oil polluted waters. Why is God doing this? Because our nations have gone a whoring after other gods. We have placed human will above the will of God. We have replaced morality with immorality. We have contaminated communities with discrimination, bigotry and harlotry. We have professed ourselves to be wise and have become fools. We have let our first love which is God and turned on each other, stated "Where is your God?"

Believe me, ladies and gentlemen, God punishes nation. "The earth is mine, saith the Lord." We think we own everything. My house,my land, my car, my children, my money, my my my..... well, I don't see any houses being buried with anyone. I do not see any Brink Armor cars parked in the cemetery nor after dark will you see any human beings in the cemetery.

Yes, God is punishing the world as he stated he would in the book of Revelation. Just look at all the technology we have, but yet we cannot cap a simple oil spill. This oil slick is larger then West Virginia and Maryland put together having the range of over 30,000 square miles. Oil has already washed up on Louisiana, Mississippi and is threatening the coast line of Florida and no one can stop it. Act of God.

Read ladies and gentlemen. Priests and Prophets cry out against immorality and violence. Call for a fast. Humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God that he may exalt you in his due time and not yours.

Yeah go ahead and say this is a crazy preacher. People said that about Noah until the flood came (125 years later). These things are not occurring by themselves. The mighty hand of God is behind it. Repent! Repent! Repent! Repent!

Yours in Jesus Christ,

Bishop William B. Caractor
Bishop William Caractor

Jersey City, NJ

#324 Jun 6, 2010
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I greet you in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. It is my sincere Prayer that you are being Blessed even as you read this email.

Today, we study the Book of Matthew chapter 2.

2:1, 2 Beth-lehem of Judea was also called Ephrath. The town is five miles south of Jerusalem. Its name in Hebrew means "House of Bread." This Judean city was the birthplace of King David. It was the original city of Joseph's ancestors. According to Luke 2:1-7, he and Mary traveled there from Nazareth and Jesus was born in a stable after they arrived. Herod the king was known as Herod the Great, and was the son of Antipater, and Edomite. He became king by Roman decree in 43 B.C. Wise men were originally the priestly caste among the Persians and Babylonians. These Magi from the East were experts in the study of the stars. Tradition claims that there were three royal visitors who were also kings. However, there is no real historical evidence to verify this. Born King of the Jews: The wise men naturally came to Jerusalem, the royal capital of Israel, seeking one whom they thought was to be born a king, on the basis of their calculations of the stars. His star could not have been merely a natural phenomenon, since it led the wise men to Jerusalem and later to Bethlehem. It almost certainly was a divine manifestation used by God to indicate the fact and place of the Messiah's birth.

2:5, 6 When the scribes replied that He would be born in Beth-lehem of Judea: for thus it is written by the prophet, they clearly anticipated a literal fulfillment of the Old Testament prophecies regarding the coming of Messiah. The quotation is from Micah 5:2. The governor who will come from Bethlehem is none other than the child-ruler predicted in Isaiah 9:6, "For unto us a child is born, unto us as a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder."

2:7-11 Herod's fear of a rival ruler caused him to question what time the star appeared. His subsequent slaughter of the children at Bethlehem from two years old and under was apparently calculated from the time given him by the wise men. The fact that the young child was found in a house (verse 11) indicates that the family had now moved out of the stable into a rented home at Bethlehem. Since the wise men brought three gifts, gold, and frankincense, and myrrh, it has been assumed that they were three in number. Significantly, they worshiped him, indicating their recognition of the deity of the One whom they were worshiping.

2:12-18 Being warned of God: A special divine revelation in the form of a warning was given both to the wise men and to Joseph in the form of a dream. Thus instructed, the wise men did not return to Herod, and Joseph and Mary fled with baby into Egypt. There was a large Jewish population in Egypt at that time, especially in and around the city of Alexandria. The holy family would have been inconspicuous during their stay and would have been welcomed by members of their own race. The death of Herod occurred in 4 B.C. Our present calendar is off in its calculation by about six years.(This would place the birth of Christ at 6/5 B.C. Herod's death is recorded in detail by Josephus, Antiquities xvii 6.5.) Jospehus calls him "a man of great barbarity towards all men." Rachel weeping for her children (verse 18) is a quotation of Jeremiah 31:15. The calamity of Israel's mourning at the time of the Exile is correlated here to this renewed calamity brought on by Herod, whose very act of ruling is a direct result of that captivity. Rachel refers to Benjamin's mother, who died outside Bethlehem (Genesis 35:19).

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