More Farms Turning To Community Suppo...

More Farms Turning To Community Supported Agriculture

There are 62 comments on the Hartford Courant story from May 17, 2009, titled More Farms Turning To Community Supported Agriculture. In it, Hartford Courant reports that:

But none of them might have worried as much as Harrison and Carol Griffin over this question: Would they be, after nine generations, the last of their line working the soil in Suffield ? Their three grown children - Jonathan, 34, Sheri Mandirola, 31, and Sarah-Jean, 22, each with an agriculture degree from Cornell University - were concerned enough ...

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GoodIdeaBut

Southington, CT

#1 May 17, 2009
Community farms and local farm in general are a good idea. Much can be gained in health, reduced environmental emissions and so forth by growing our produce and flowers locally, avoiding long transit and chemical. However, Sarah Jane Griffin, you really need something more than flip-flops and a diddle stick to have a productive farm. This looks sort of silly and unconvincing that you really do farm.
Ken

United States

#3 May 17, 2009
For much more on Connecticut farming, visit www.workingtheland.com
Ben

New Britain, CT

#4 May 17, 2009
The best part of farming is the state lets you have Farm Plates on your vehicles that you don't use for farming. You can save lots of money and the state is too stupid to catch us. Only suckers have Passenger Plates.
bebe

Meriden, CT

#5 May 17, 2009
GoodIdeaBut wrote:
Community farms and local farm in general are a good idea. Much can be gained in health, reduced environmental emissions and so forth by growing our produce and flowers locally, avoiding long transit and chemical. However, Sarah Jane Griffin, you really need something more than flip-flops and a diddle stick to have a productive farm. This looks sort of silly and unconvincing that you really do farm.
Runner up for stupidest comment.
bebe

Ashland, KY

#6 May 17, 2009
Ben wrote:
The best part of farming is the state lets you have Farm Plates on your vehicles that you don't use for farming. You can save lots of money and the state is too stupid to catch us. Only suckers have Passenger Plates.
First place for stupidest comment.
Bill

Orlando, FL

#7 May 17, 2009
I can tell it's getting to be summer. The pleasant odor of manure has inundated the Quiet Corner.

Since: May 09

Royal Palm Beach, Fla

#8 May 17, 2009
Bill wrote:
I can tell it's getting to be summer. The pleasant odor of manure has inundated the Quiet Corner.
that is not manure, it is Ben's breath
John Bodnar

Windsor Locks, CT

#9 May 17, 2009
I hope it works,we lost too many farms the past decade.They were replaced by McMansions.
Bill Smith

United States

#10 May 17, 2009
Monosoto will not let this last much longer, with the help of the FDA and the courts. They own 70% of the world's agriculture. There is already legislation in place to outlaw organic and back yard gardening, all in the name of safety of course!!
Oh no

La Vernia, TX

#11 May 17, 2009
Wont be long until the are people looking for a bailout, because they speculated and lost their money or get hooked up with a shady farmer...
charleesue

Barbourville, KY

#12 May 17, 2009
and what are we going to do when no farmers go to the farmers market because they can't afford the increase it is going to cost vendors??????????
Can't the state see just how darn hard it is to survive, with the property taxes in Ct. so high and retired people can't sell their houses becauses of the market being down so far.
Maybe Jodi Rell should start doing her own hair and she will see just how the rest of us are going to have to live.

Since: May 09

Royal Palm Beach, Fla

#13 May 17, 2009
John Bodnar wrote:
I hope it works,we lost too many farms the past decade.They were replaced by McMansions.
Yeah McMansions given to spoiled idiots who lost them !! GIVE ME GIVE ME GIVE ME GENERATION !!
Shark Bait

Gales Ferry, CT

#14 May 17, 2009
I think we need a few more mathematical facts in this story.

$425 x 30 shares =$12,750

They planted 3 or 4 acres worth of stuff.

The product goes to the shareholders. They are going to buy a new tractor, pay for advertising, etc.

Let's say two members of the family do the work to grow this stuff over the summer. Pick a number of man hours as you see fit, and place a value on that time.

So when all is said and done, how much of the $12,750 is left? Seems like this amount, or whatever is left of it, is kind of light to be considered a meaningful amount of revenue for this type of venture. How many members of the Griffin family are dividing up the profits?

In summary, the business model seems like it may be somewhat flawed.

Also, from the shareholder standpoint, I need to get a lot of veggies for $425.00. That seems steep, unless this venture is designed to attract resellers of some sort who are going to just turn this stuff around somewhere else at a marked up price.
what r u talking about 1

South Windsor, CT

#15 May 17, 2009
Shark Bait wrote:
I think we need a few more mathematical facts in this story.
$425 x 30 shares =$12,750
They planted 3 or 4 acres worth of stuff.
The product goes to the shareholders. They are going to buy a new tractor, pay for advertising, etc.
Let's say two members of the family do the work to grow this stuff over the summer. Pick a number of man hours as you see fit, and place a value on that time.
So when all is said and done, how much of the $12,750 is left? Seems like this amount, or whatever is left of it, is kind of light to be considered a meaningful amount of revenue for this type of venture. How many members of the Griffin family are dividing up the profits?
In summary, the business model seems like it may be somewhat flawed.
Also, from the shareholder standpoint, I need to get a lot of veggies for $425.00. That seems steep, unless this venture is designed to attract resellers of some sort who are going to just turn this stuff around somewhere else at a marked up price.
Where in this article do you see any referance to the number of shares (30) X 425.00.You would have a great point except for the fact thast there is no reference to 30.
Connecticut oldie

Schaumburg, IL

#16 May 17, 2009
What's new with this. When I grew up in Connecticut we picked blueberries up on hunters mountain in Naugatuck. Apples at Gustavasons in Watertown, Tomatoes from Sera's near Plymouth lake and got farm fresh milk at Gustavasons. That was the way of life in Connecticut. What happened?? The do gooders decided that farm fresh anything wasn't good for you---and regulated it.

The city folks moved into farm country to be "out in the country" for the benefits of the "country". But they couldn't stand the smells of the farm or the buzzing of flys that come with the farms--or the noise of the milk tankers or the tractors working the land or anything associated with the farm country they invaded.

Apparently, what was old is new again!!!! Maybe this time, we all will learn to appreciate the farms before they all are gone.
Shark Bait

Gales Ferry, CT

#17 May 17, 2009
what r u talking about 1 wrote:
<quoted text>Where in this article do you see any referance to the number of shares (30) X 425.00.You would have a great point except for the fact thast there is no reference to 30.
"As the farm has been developed, so have the family's plans. They are offering 30 full shares in the first year, and will grow about 20 vegetables from broccoli to squash through the summer."

Read it again.
Holy Cow

Ellington, CT

#18 May 17, 2009
Shark Bait - I think you better read it again, no where is the number 30 or word thirty mentioned. At least on the web story, the paper maybe different.
Holy Cow

Ellington, CT

#19 May 17, 2009
Sorry, found it on the 2nd page. And I agree $425 is a lot of veggies
Still A Metalhead

Newington, CT

#20 May 18, 2009
If I had the cash this year, i would have bought in. I love supporting my local farmer and have been for years. I probably spend an easy $400+ a year on vegetables from Bielonko farms in Suffield for the past 6+ years (probably mispelled it) and probably just as much with Easy Pickins in Enfield. I hate giving my money to large stores who get their produce from everywhere, coat it with wax and such, ripen it in chambers and do other things we don't know about. I like my veggies with the dirt still on them. So all you Suffield, East Granby and Enfield farmers, keep the veggies coming. My stomach can't wait.:) I will be there at the Farmer's Market cash in hand.

I also like the idea of the Co-Op farming where small farms band together to afford some of the high cost equipment and other costs. I see many farms doing that too.
The Tomato Stake

Piscataway, NJ

#21 May 18, 2009
The best way to support your tomato plants is with The Tomato Stake.

www.thetomatostake.com

Easier to use than metal cages or upside down planters, stronger than bamboo and won't rot like wood stakes. The built-in twist-tie supports make tying your tomato plants easy!

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