Arkansas GOP calls candidates' statements "offensive"

Oct 7, 2012 Full story: news.yahoo.com 22

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) Arkansas Republicans tried to distance themselves Saturday from a Republican state representative's assertion that slavery was a "blessing in disguise" and a Republican state House candidate who advocates deporting all Muslims.

The claims were made in books written, respectively, by Rep. Jon Hubbard of Jonesboro and House candidate Charlie Fuqua of Batesville. Those books received attention on Internet news sites Friday.

On Saturday, state GOP Chairman Doyle Webb called the books "highly offensive." And U.S. Rep. Rick Crawford, a Republican who represents northeast Arkansas, called the writings "divisive and racially inflammatory."

Hubbard wrote in his 2009 self-published book, "Letters To The Editor: Confessions Of A Frustrated Conservative," that

"the institution of slavery that the black race has long believed to be an abomination upon its people may actually have been a blessing in disguise."
He also wrote that African-Americans were better off than they would have been had they not been captured and shipped to the United States.

Fuqua, who served in the Arkansas House from 1996 to 1998, wrote there is

"no solution to the Muslim problem short of expelling all followers of the religion from the United States," in his 2012 book, titled "God's Law."

Fuqua said Saturday that he hadn't realized he'd become a target within his own party, which he said surprised him.

"I think my views are fairly well-accepted by most people," Fuqua said before hanging up, saying he was busy knocking on voters' doors. The attorney is running against incumbent Democratic Rep. James McLean in House District 63.

Hubbard, a marketing representative, didn't return voicemail messages seeking comment Saturday. He is running against Democrat Harold Copenhaver in House District 58.

The November elections could be a crucial turning point in Arkansas politics. Democrats hold narrow majorities in both chambers, but the GOP has been working hard to swing the Legislature its way for the first time since the end of the Civil War, buoyed by picking up three congressional seats in 2010. Their efforts have also been backed by an influx of money from national conservative groups

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The Rest of the Article

Paragould, AR

#1 Oct 7, 2012
Rep. Crawford said Saturday he was "disappointed and disturbed."

"The statements that have been reported portray attitudes and beliefs that would return our state and country to a harmful and regrettable past," Crawford said.

U.S. Rep. Tim Griffin, R-Ark., kicked off the GOP's response Saturday by issuing a release, saying the "statements of Hubbard and Fuqua are ridiculous, outrageous and have no place in the civil discourse of either party."

"Had I known of these statements, I would not have contributed to their campaigns. I am requesting that they give my contributions to charity," said Griffin, who donated $100 to each candidate.

The Arkansas Republican House Caucus followed, saying the views of Hubbard and Fuqua "are in no way reflective of, or endorsed by, the Republican caucus. The constituencies they are seeking to represent will ultimately judge these statements at the ballot box."

Then Webb, who has spearheaded the party's attempt to control the Legislature, said the writings "were highly offensive to many Americans and do not reflect the viewpoints of the Republican Party of Arkansas. While we respect their right to freedom of expression and thought, we strongly disagree with those ideas."

Webb, though, accused state Democrats of using the issue as a distraction.

Democrats themselves have been largely silent, aside from the state party's tweet and Facebook post calling attention to the writings. A Democratic Party spokesman didn't immediately return a call for comment Saturday.

The two candidates share other political and religious views on their campaign websites.

Hubbard, who sponsored a failed bill in 2011 that would have severely restricted immigration, wrote on his website that the issue is still among his priorities, as is doing "whatever I can to defend, protect and preserve our Christian heritage."

Fuqua blogs on his website. One post is titled, "Christianity in Retreat," and says "there is a strange alliance between the liberal left and the Muslim religion."

"Both are antichrist in that they both deny that Jesus is God in the flesh of man, and the savior of mankind. They both also hold that their cause should take over the entire world through violent, bloody, revolution," the post says.

In a separate passage, Fuqua wrote "we now have a president that has a well documented history with both the Muslim religion and Communism."

“Common Sense over Politics”

Since: Feb 09

Call me Cal.

#2 Oct 7, 2012
All radicals need to be removed from office. Whether it be religious radicals, environmental radicals, racism radicals, liberal radicals or conservative radicals.

My advice.... Vote for no radicals.
guest

Paragould, AR

#3 Oct 7, 2012
A Jonesboro politician makes national news. Great job! Slavery was good and all Muslims should be deported? Geez!
3OHA

San Jose, CA

#4 Oct 7, 2012
Offensive, or not, the statements are true.
guest

Paragould, AR

#5 Oct 7, 2012
3OHA wrote:
Offensive, or not, the statements are true.
No, the statements are not true.
1 post removed
you sad people

Paragould, AR

#7 Oct 7, 2012
Axe V2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Agreed. There is no disputing this, given the current state of African nations under the "leadership" (lol) of blacks.
"African-Americans were better off than they would have been had they not been captured and shipped to the United States."
The place is a sewer, and slave-descendents are ungrateful, pouting, whining children.
First of all, he said a lot more than what you quoted, though you were equally (or maybe even more) pathetic in your own thoughts that you added.

Secondly, maybe the then future Thomas Jefferson or George Washington of Africa was enslaved back then, neither he nor you knows.

Thirdly, the idea that the present (if your ridiculous characterization of the present was true) justifies the past is absurd.

Forthly, your assessment of Africa at present, as well as everything else, is childishly sad.

KKK? Does your God hate blacks? Do you think that interracial marriages should be illegal? God made people like they are, and His plan shouldn't be messed with, right? Sure, this is what Jesus would want. Sound familiar? Go to...
1 post removed
you sad people

Paragould, AR

#9 Oct 7, 2012
Axe V2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Who said I believed in Jesus?
I'm not racist against blacks because I'm some backwoods, toothless, hick that you so desperately want to pigeonhole me.
I'm racist against blacks because I've met them.
You accusing anyone of "so desperately wanting to pigeonhole you" is hilariously hypocritical! The idea that you are religious and racist (and that your views about the former effect the latter) was an educated guess. Apparently you can't draw true conclusions from personal experience though. Go figure.

That aside, do you agree with the other half of this news article, which involves statements of support of the deportation of all Muslims in America by a politican?
you sad people

Paragould, AR

#10 Oct 7, 2012
Also Axe V2, someone doesn't have to be a "backwards toothless hick" to have these ridiculous views. These politicians prove that. So why would I assume that of you? I didn't.
1 post removed

“I can see better with”

Since: Mar 11

my eyes closed

#12 Oct 7, 2012
Axe V2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Agreed. There is no disputing this, given the current state of African nations under the "leadership" (lol) of blacks.
"African-Americans were better off than they would have been had they not been captured and shipped to the United States."
The place is a sewer, and slave-descendents are ungrateful, pouting, whining children.
you would be better off if you would STFU
3OHA

San Jose, CA

#13 Oct 7, 2012
guest wrote:
<quoted text>
No, the statements are not true.
While I don't agree with the racist nonsense my post encouraged, the Black slaves coming to the Americas were actually saved from much worse slavery and most times death at the hands of very crazy, Muslim influenced Black Kings, who often paved their throne rooms with the skulls of those they eventually sold to Whites. The Whites didn't have armies, nor navies collecting slaves. Blacks collected Black slaves. The Muslims in Africa actually enslaved many more Blacks, than Whites did. Their conditions were much worse than any Black arriving in what became the United States. The Muslims continue slavery at its most base levels even today.

North American slaveholders saved all those Blacks from impending death, which would have meant none of their children would have ever survived. Whites in America clothed, fed, housed and educated the Blacks. Their descendants here can't even relate to the horror the Blacks perform and experience even now in Africa.

These are facts and realities. Blacks in America benefited from the slave trade because they are alive to talk about it.

“Common Sense over Politics”

Since: Feb 09

Call me Cal.

#14 Oct 7, 2012
3OHA wrote:
While I don't agree with the racist nonsense my post encouraged, the Black slaves coming to the Americas were actually saved from much worse slavery and most times death at the hands of very crazy, Muslim influenced Black Kings, who often paved their throne rooms with the skulls of those they eventually sold to Whites. The Whites didn't have armies, nor navies collecting slaves. Blacks collected Black slaves. The Muslims in Africa actually enslaved many more Blacks, than Whites did. Their conditions were much worse than any Black arriving in what became the United States. The Muslims continue slavery at its most base levels even today.

North American slaveholders saved all those Blacks from impending death, which would have meant none of their children would have ever survived. Whites in America clothed, fed, housed and educated the Blacks. Their descendants here can't even relate to the horror the Blacks perform and experience even now in Africa.

These are facts and realities. Blacks in America benefited from the slave trade because they are alive to talk about it.
From a health standpoint .... The slaves of the south were better off than the sweatshop workers in the northern states. Slavery is still wrong.
1 post removed
guest

Paragould, AR

#16 Oct 8, 2012
3OHA wrote:
<quoted text>
While I don't agree with the racist nonsense my post encouraged...
...and yet you post more racist nonsense?
guest

Paragould, AR

#17 Oct 8, 2012
3OHA wrote:
<quoted text>
...These are facts and realities.


No, they aren't.
3OHA wrote:
<quoted text>
Blacks in America benefited from the slave trade because they are alive to talk about it.
First of all, there are obviously still blacks in Africa.

Secondly, unless slavery ended much more recently that I thought, then you must know some extremely old (were're talking record breaking age) blacks.
you sad people

Paragould, AR

#18 Oct 9, 2012
Axe V2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Then why are you blathering about Jesus?
I couldn't care less.
If you couldn't care less, then why are you blathering about anything?
Paul Ryan

Paragould, AR

#19 Oct 12, 2012
The Rest of the Article wrote:
Rep. Crawford said Saturday he was "disappointed and disturbed."
"The statements that have been reported portray attitudes and beliefs that would return our state and country to a harmful and regrettable past," Crawford said.
U.S. Rep. Tim Griffin, R-Ark., kicked off the GOP's response Saturday by issuing a release, saying the "statements of Hubbard and Fuqua are ridiculous, outrageous and have no place in the civil discourse of either party."
"Had I known of these statements, I would not have contributed to their campaigns. I am requesting that they give my contributions to charity," said Griffin, who donated $100 to each candidate.
The Arkansas Republican House Caucus followed, saying the views of Hubbard and Fuqua "are in no way reflective of, or endorsed by, the Republican caucus. The constituencies they are seeking to represent will ultimately judge these statements at the ballot box."
Then Webb, who has spearheaded the party's attempt to control the Legislature, said the writings "were highly offensive to many Americans and do not reflect the viewpoints of the Republican Party of Arkansas. While we respect their right to freedom of expression and thought, we strongly disagree with those ideas."
Webb, though, accused state Democrats of using the issue as a distraction.
Democrats themselves have been largely silent, aside from the state party's tweet and Facebook post calling attention to the writings. A Democratic Party spokesman didn't immediately return a call for comment Saturday.
The two candidates share other political and religious views on their campaign websites.
Hubbard, who sponsored a failed bill in 2011 that would have severely restricted immigration, wrote on his website that the issue is still among his priorities, as is doing "whatever I can to defend, protect and preserve our Christian heritage."
Fuqua blogs on his website. One post is titled, "Christianity in Retreat," and says "there is a strange alliance between the liberal left and the Muslim religion."
"Both are antichrist in that they both deny that Jesus is God in the flesh of man, and the savior of mankind. They both also hold that their cause should take over the entire world through violent, bloody, revolution," the post says.
In a separate passage, Fuqua wrote "we now have a president that has a well documented history with both the Muslim religion and Communism."
Up is down and down is up anyways! Now down is up and up is down!
Ben

Rogers, AR

#20 Oct 12, 2012
Seems to me that the GOP dose not want to own this statment.
Joe Biden

Paragould, AR

#21 Oct 12, 2012
Paul Ryan wrote:
<quoted text>
Up is down and down is up anyways! Now down is up and up is down!
You are so full of sh...
guest

Jonesboro, AR

#22 Oct 12, 2012
Many of you need to actualy read the statements that were actually made. The is yet another case of the democRATs destorting the facts.
Do as you Say

Paragould, AR

#23 Oct 13, 2012
guest wrote:
Many of you need to actualy read the statements that were actually made. The is yet another case of the democRATs destorting the facts.
It sounds like you need to actually read the statements that were actually made. You claim that others are distorting the facts (and you call them RATs), yet you didn't say what the facts are. There is probably a reason for that. Is it that there isn't any defense for them?

Also, why are you just whining about "democRATs?" You should be saying the same about all of the prominent republicans that the news article quoted as denouncing those statements (and the politicians that they came from). Do those republicans need to actually read the statements that were actually made too?

Consistency (and honesty) please. Is that too much to ask of you?
guest

Jonesboro, AR

#24 Oct 13, 2012
Do as you Say wrote:
<quoted text>
It sounds like you need to actually read the statements that were actually made. You claim that others are distorting the facts (and you call them RATs), yet you didn't say what the facts are. There is probably a reason for that. Is it that there isn't any defense for them?
Also, why are you just whining about "democRATs?" You should be saying the same about all of the prominent republicans that the news article quoted as denouncing those statements (and the politicians that they came from). Do those republicans need to actually read the statements that were actually made too?
Consistency (and honesty) please. Is that too much to ask of you?
Do you really trust anything the liberal extremist media tell you? They always twist the story to help the democRAT.

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