Ohio Slipping Out Of Romney's Reach

Full story: ABC News 2,841
OHIO NOW LEANS OBAMA: ABC News Political Director Amy Walter notes that today's New York Times-CBS News-Quinnipiac poll is the fourth non-partisan media poll in a row to show President Obama not only ahead by a significant margin, but at or above 50 percent of the vote. Read more

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2791 Nov 19, 2012
WasteWater wrote:
<quoted text>
Manipulating figures makes no difference to how we create real jobs does it. What makes real jobs happen?
what clinton called real jobs, I didnt call them real jobs.
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#2792 Nov 19, 2012
WasteWater wrote:
<quoted text>
Also true. So what is going to solve the problem? What is going to create real jobs? Any ideas?
For one, we can get rid of Obama Care. That's been scaring the employers for quite some time now. Next would be to implement Romney's plan. He believes that money made overseas by multinational companies stays there because if it's transferred here, it gets taxed. For instance: If GM goes back under in the US, but they are doing great in other parts of the world, they won't transfer any money to help their industry here because of taxation. Companies won't expand in the US either unless it's from profits made in the US.

That brings us to higher costs. DumBama put electric plants out of business or placed heavy regulation on them costing electric companies tens of millions. Those costs get transferred to us and our manufacturing.

Here's the problem: Obama will talk with industry leaders, but never take their advice because it goes against his political agenda. Canada has half the corporate taxation rates and less loopholes, so why open up an industry in the US?

You have to make the US a business friendly environment.
chickpea

Seattle, WA

#2793 Nov 19, 2012
I'm looking to the future with new supreme court nominees.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2794 Nov 19, 2012
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
For one, we can get rid of Obama Care. That's been scaring the employers for quite some time now. Next would be to implement Romney's plan. He believes that money made overseas by multinational companies stays there because if it's transferred here, it gets taxed. For instance: If GM goes back under in the US, but they are doing great in other parts of the world, they won't transfer any money to help their industry here because of taxation. Companies won't expand in the US either unless it's from profits made in the US.
That brings us to higher costs. DumBama put electric plants out of business or placed heavy regulation on them costing electric companies tens of millions. Those costs get transferred to us and our manufacturing.
Here's the problem: Obama will talk with industry leaders, but never take their advice because it goes against his political agenda. Canada has half the corporate taxation rates and less loopholes, so why open up an industry in the US?
You have to make the US a business friendly environment.
Excuse me, it is based upon Romney's plan implemented in Massachusetts when he was governor.

Small employers are where most of the job growth happens. It is a competitive advantage to small employers.

You want to make the U.S. business friendly? How would you like to live next to a stinky canal or steel factory? Do you believe in child labor? How about state run health care? These are some of the competitive advantages for business in the orient. Do these things sound good to you?

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2795 Nov 19, 2012
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
For one, we can get rid of Obama Care. That's been scaring the employers for quite some time now. Next would be to implement Romney's plan. He believes that money made overseas by multinational companies stays there because if it's transferred here, it gets taxed. For instance: If GM goes back under in the US, but they are doing great in other parts of the world, they won't transfer any money to help their industry here because of taxation. Companies won't expand in the US either unless it's from profits made in the US.
That brings us to higher costs. DumBama put electric plants out of business or placed heavy regulation on them costing electric companies tens of millions. Those costs get transferred to us and our manufacturing.
Here's the problem: Obama will talk with industry leaders, but never take their advice because it goes against his political agenda. Canada has half the corporate taxation rates and less loopholes, so why open up an industry in the US?
You have to make the US a business friendly environment.
'Bring Back the 91% Tax Rate'
How would reviving the 1950s tax code work today?

Yet in the 1950s incomes in the top bracket faced a marginal tax rate of 91, that’s right, 91 percent, while taxes on corporate profits were twice as large, relative to national income, as in recent years. The best estimates suggest that circa 1960 the top 0.01 percent of Americans paid an effective federal tax rate of more than 70 percent, twice what they pay today.

Nor were high taxes the only burden wealthy businessmen had to bear. They also faced a labor force with a degree of bargaining power hard to imagine today. In 1955 roughly a third of American workers were union members. In the biggest companies, management and labor bargained as equals, so much so that it was common to talk about corporations serving an array of “stakeholders” as opposed to merely serving stockholders.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/19/opinion/kru...

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2796 Nov 19, 2012
Anonymous of Indy wrote:
<quoted text>what clinton called real jobs, I didnt call them real jobs.
I agree. Let's take a look at those prosperous years. I saw economies based on dot com speculation. Fortunes were made and spent. Many people were employed. The funny thing is, the money never existed. Everything was based upon inflated ideas of wealth rather than anything tangible.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2797 Nov 19, 2012
chickpea wrote:
I'm looking to the future with new supreme court nominees.
This may be the only thing we get out of it.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2798 Nov 19, 2012
Anonymous of Indy wrote:
<quoted text>'Bring Back the 91% Tax Rate'
How would reviving the 1950s tax code work today?
Yet in the 1950s incomes in the top bracket faced a marginal tax rate of 91, that’s right, 91 percent, while taxes on corporate profits were twice as large, relative to national income, as in recent years. The best estimates suggest that circa 1960 the top 0.01 percent of Americans paid an effective federal tax rate of more than 70 percent, twice what they pay today.
Nor were high taxes the only burden wealthy businessmen had to bear. They also faced a labor force with a degree of bargaining power hard to imagine today. In 1955 roughly a third of American workers were union members. In the biggest companies, management and labor bargained as equals, so much so that it was common to talk about corporations serving an array of “stakeholders” as opposed to merely serving stockholders.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/19/opinion/kru...
Too bad we never leveled the playing field. China is about to bury us yet so many people in this country are sniveling about socialism. If socialism is so vile, why is China poised to be the economic powerhouse of the world? Why do they own the U.S. along with Russia? Am I missing something here?
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#2799 Nov 19, 2012
WasteWater wrote:
<quoted text>
Excuse me, it is based upon Romney's plan implemented in Massachusetts when he was governor.
Small employers are where most of the job growth happens. It is a competitive advantage to small employers.
You want to make the U.S. business friendly? How would you like to live next to a stinky canal or steel factory? Do you believe in child labor? How about state run health care? These are some of the competitive advantages for business in the orient. Do these things sound good to you?
You asked, I told you.

The problem in the US is that we allowed unions to price us out of the world market. Yes, it took decades to do, but this is one reason why we can't compete today.

It is true that small businesses are the largest employers. However, where does small business get their business from? They get it from big businesses either directly or indirectly.

So you want to open up a business, but you have to decide on where to open it. Let's look at the US and see what the expenses are as an employer: Workman's compensation insurance, unemployment insurance, paid holidays, paid vacation, healthcare insurance, OSHA regulations, matching Social Security contributions for each employee, matching Medicare contributions for each employee, highest corporate tax rate in the world, federal tax, state tax, county taxes, city taxes, environmental upgrades or costs, building insurance, and I'm sure there are some I left out such as accounting to fiddle through all those tax laws and lawyers to handle liability coverage.

These are just SOME of the expenses a business owner has to consider to open up a business in the US.
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#2800 Nov 19, 2012
Anonymous of Indy wrote:
<quoted text>'Bring Back the 91% Tax Rate'
How would reviving the 1950s tax code work today?
Yet in the 1950s incomes in the top bracket faced a marginal tax rate of 91, that’s right, 91 percent, while taxes on corporate profits were twice as large, relative to national income, as in recent years. The best estimates suggest that circa 1960 the top 0.01 percent of Americans paid an effective federal tax rate of more than 70 percent, twice what they pay today.
Nor were high taxes the only burden wealthy businessmen had to bear. They also faced a labor force with a degree of bargaining power hard to imagine today. In 1955 roughly a third of American workers were union members. In the biggest companies, management and labor bargained as equals, so much so that it was common to talk about corporations serving an array of “stakeholders” as opposed to merely serving stockholders.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/19/opinion/kru...
Several thoughts on this: first of all, nobody paid 91% of their income in taxes. It's like our 35% corporate rate today. Most companies don't pay that high of a tax, but some do.

Secondly of course is that we are way more mobile today than we were in the 1950's. There was virtually no place to go other than the US for manufacturing. Heck, we didn't even have doppler back then to tell us of weather conditions for flight or boat. You took your chances with the information we had.

We didn't have worldwide communication like we have today. You couldn't transfer funds by turning on your computer and clicking your mouse a few times. Today you can have meetings with other VIP's over the internet. International telephone service was nearly impossible.

But now that we have these incredible transportation advancements and technology to boot, we can operate overseas giving us an option as to whether we stay in the US and manufacture here or not. That wasn't available in the 50's.

Want to see how high taxation affects the wealthy? Take a look at California, New York City or even France. People leave in droves.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/48120446

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2801 Nov 19, 2012
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
You asked, I told you.
The problem in the US is that we allowed unions to price us out of the world market. Yes, it took decades to do, but this is one reason why we can't compete today.
It is true that small businesses are the largest employers. However, where does small business get their business from? They get it from big businesses either directly or indirectly.
So you want to open up a business, but you have to decide on where to open it. Let's look at the US and see what the expenses are as an employer: Workman's compensation insurance, unemployment insurance, paid holidays, paid vacation, healthcare insurance, OSHA regulations, matching Social Security contributions for each employee, matching Medicare contributions for each employee, highest corporate tax rate in the world, federal tax, state tax, county taxes, city taxes, environmental upgrades or costs, building insurance, and I'm sure there are some I left out such as accounting to fiddle through all those tax laws and lawyers to handle liability coverage.
These are just SOME of the expenses a business owner has to consider to open up a business in the US.
You are scapegoating the Unions. The fact of the matter is, after WWII we build modern factories overseas rebuilding Japan and Germany. Our factories became out dated.

Untrue. Small businesses provide needed goods and services rather than consumer products. Big businesses provide consumer products, most of which are manufactured outside the country.

I agree with you that most of those taxation things are a problem, even for small employers. If we did like the competitive countries do and eliminated health care and workers comp by having a state owned program, we would be more competitive. I see health care costs as a huge barrier to expanding the job market. As a country, we need to be more realistic as to what our health care system should look like. We need to provide basic services to all without burdening the employers. People who want more than basic services can pay for it themselves with insurance. We could expand medicare to all and eliminate many of the extraordinary things we do which waste money. IOWs if one gets really bad off, we pull the plug sooner.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2802 Nov 19, 2012
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
Several thoughts on this: first of all, nobody paid 91% of their income in taxes. It's like our 35% corporate rate today. Most companies don't pay that high of a tax, but some do.
Secondly of course is that we are way more mobile today than we were in the 1950's. There was virtually no place to go other than the US for manufacturing. Heck, we didn't even have doppler back then to tell us of weather conditions for flight or boat. You took your chances with the information we had.
We didn't have worldwide communication like we have today. You couldn't transfer funds by turning on your computer and clicking your mouse a few times. Today you can have meetings with other VIP's over the internet. International telephone service was nearly impossible.
But now that we have these incredible transportation advancements and technology to boot, we can operate overseas giving us an option as to whether we stay in the US and manufacture here or not. That wasn't available in the 50's.
Want to see how high taxation affects the wealthy? Take a look at California, New York City or even France. People leave in droves.
http://www.cnbc.com/id/48120446
They don't necessarily leave, they just establish residencies elsewhere. They have all kinds of games such as LLCs and off-shore accounts. I wonder how they can actually be taxed more. They already wrote the rule book which leaves them many outs.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2803 Nov 19, 2012
WasteWater wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree. Let's take a look at those prosperous years. I saw economies based on dot com speculation. Fortunes were made and spent. Many people were employed. The funny thing is, the money never existed. Everything was based upon inflated ideas of wealth rather than anything tangible.
exactly
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#2804 Nov 19, 2012
WasteWater wrote:
<quoted text>
You are scapegoating the Unions. The fact of the matter is, after WWII we build modern factories overseas rebuilding Japan and Germany. Our factories became out dated.
Untrue. Small businesses provide needed goods and services rather than consumer products. Big businesses provide consumer products, most of which are manufactured outside the country.
I agree with you that most of those taxation things are a problem, even for small employers. If we did like the competitive countries do and eliminated health care and workers comp by having a state owned program, we would be more competitive. I see health care costs as a huge barrier to expanding the job market. As a country, we need to be more realistic as to what our health care system should look like. We need to provide basic services to all without burdening the employers. People who want more than basic services can pay for it themselves with insurance. We could expand medicare to all and eliminate many of the extraordinary things we do which waste money. IOWs if one gets really bad off, we pull the plug sooner.
Well I disagree with your disagreement because I work for a very small business. We have about a dozen employees. When we need equipment, we don't turn to small business, we need big business for that. Small business doesn't manufacture trucks or tow motors. I also question some of our customers as to what products they manufacture. Many times they are manufacturing items that they sell to big businesses either directly or indirectly.

Workman's compensation is state and private run. I don't know who mandates workman's compensation, but I would hate to see us do without it. But like any other freebie, it's often abused. Doctors know that as long as a worker is on comp. he or she will have a returning patient, so between patient and doctor, they find a way to stretch out workman's comp as long as possible. That drives the price up. In fact, the two biggest reasons our customers have left the state or country were because of unions or workman's comp costs. My employer pays about $60,000 per year just to cover us, and we've had very few claims and no serious ones to boot. Imagine what a company of 200 employees pays.

There is one other way to bring back manufacturing to the US, but I doubt we will ever be able to do it. And that is convince Americans to buy American made products. The theme of our country is cheap. We don't care who makes our products or what quality they are, as long as they are cheep. In order to please consumers, stores carry mostly foreign made products. It's the reason Wal-Mart is number one in our country.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2805 Nov 19, 2012
Anonymous of Indy wrote:
<quoted text>exactly
I have another one for you.

How about this dead mall in Idaho?



Post Falls, Idaho. It is located between Coeur D'alene and Spokane. The last time it showed any business was in 2007. Like other malls, it was build on cheap land far out of any town. People came there using credit cards. Investors put money up building it hoping to make a return. Cars drove there and stopped because of relatively cheap fuel. It all came crashing down.

1. Consumer credit crashed.

2. Fuel prices went up.

3. People's disposable income dropped.

The formula for success was built upon a house of cards. None of this was sustainable. We have dead malls coast to coast. Nobody needs them.

xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#2806 Nov 19, 2012
WasteWater wrote:
<quoted text>
They don't necessarily leave, they just establish residencies elsewhere. They have all kinds of games such as LLCs and off-shore accounts. I wonder how they can actually be taxed more. They already wrote the rule book which leaves them many outs.
You can't fight city hall. The truth is that the top ten highest tax states are losing population to the ten lowest taxed states in our country. When a state is trying to attract a business, what's the most common strategy they use? That's right, tax abatements.

People and companies react to tax changes. It's a fallacy that when you increase taxes on anybody, it will have no affect at all in society. The same holds true when you lower taxes. It's the theory of every action causes a reaction of some sorts. So what you look for is to take actions that will cause a positive reaction instead of a negative one.

Since: Aug 12

United States

#2807 Nov 19, 2012
Entitlements buy votes.... Plain and simple.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#2808 Nov 19, 2012
UdintBuildThat wrote:
Entitlements buy votes.... Plain and simple.
exactly, goto Chapter 4 "Wosrt Legistlation in History" in the book titled "IMPOSTOR, How George W. Bush Bankrupted America and Betrayed the Reagan Legacy" when Bush and the Conservatives passed and Signed into Law Medicare Part D which play out Nixion's playbook how to get votes.
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#2809 Nov 19, 2012
UdintBuildThat wrote:
Entitlements buy votes.... Plain and simple.
I've said that since the election results. But I was just watching Bill'O, and he posted a statistic that 64% of people who make less than $30,000 per year voted for DumBama. That's quite telling.

He then questioned what these people who made under $30,000 per year were voting on? More jobs which DumBama didn't provide? Social issues? Libya? High unemployment? What?

Half of the people in our country receive some government goodie of some kind. It's reasonable to assume that many of those people fall into the less than $30,000 category. It was a pretty good monologue.

Since: Feb 12

Location hidden

#2810 Nov 19, 2012
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
Pretty impressive, huh?
We got the pre-spun job quantity data already, where we learned that nearly 3 times the headline print was due to seasonal and B/D adjustments and is thus nothing but noise. Now we get the quality. As can be seen below, courtesy of Table A9 from the Household Survey, in July the number of part-time jobs added was 31K, bringing the total to 27,925, just shy of the all time record of 28,038. Full time jobs? Down 228,000 to 114,345,000 lower than the February full-time jobs print of 114,408,000. Once again, more and more Americans are relinquishing any and all benefits associated with Full Time Jobs benefits, and instead are agreeing on a job. Any job. Even if it means working just 1 hour a week. For the BLS it doesn't matter - 1 hour of work a week still qualifies you as a Part-Time worker.
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/full-time-jobs-...
Burger flipping jobs.
I saw this headline on front page of Dayton paper today and thought about you. I think it is the link that reads 22 hours ago.

News for Trucking jobs, dayton daily news
HispanicBu...
Ohio and U.S. companies in demand for truck drivers

Dayton Daily News - 22 hours ago
Truck-driving jobs are among the fastest growing occupations in the ... to attract qualified drivers, according to a Dayton Daily News analysis.
Veterans look for jobs and hope | www.daytondailynews.com www.daytondailynews.com/news/news/veterans-lo...

Nov 10, 2012 ...“There's no advantage to being a veteran in the job market,” he said.... them qualified for commercial truck driving jobs when they return home.
Business | www.daytondailynews.com www.daytondailynews.com/s/business/

Get up-to-date business industry news.... Truck-driving jobs are among the fastest growing occupations in the nation, but fewer residents in the region have ...

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