Barack Obama, our next President

Barack Obama, our next President

There are 1404159 comments on the Hampton Roads Daily Press story from Nov 5, 2008, titled Barack Obama, our next President. In it, Hampton Roads Daily Press reports that:

"The road ahead will be long. Our climb will be steep," Obama cautioned. Young and charismatic but with little experience on the national level, Obama smashed through racial barriers and easily defeated ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Hampton Roads Daily Press.

Nobama

United States

#657241 Jun 6, 2012
sonicfilter wrote:
"I’m in the camp of those who thinks that Walker, reflecting the current right-wing tilt of contemporary conservatism, really has put a winner-take-all approach above the quest for consensus. His move against collective bargaining, along with the enactment of laws designed to make it harder for poorer and younger Wisconsin residents to vote, was destined to provoke outrage. He was trying to rig the laws to weaken his political opposition.
This is very different from streamlining government. Many governors have made cuts without provoking such rage. And, in fact, all the deep cuts in state and local governments across the country have made our economic problems worse. Austerity at a time when we are struggling to undo the impact of a deep recession is a bad idea."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-part...
how do you explain the fact that a high percentage of government union members in Wisconsin have opted out of membership when given the choice???...

are you against "choice"???...

Since: May 11

Aspers, PA

#657242 Jun 6, 2012
EasyEed wrote:
<quoted text>
"Real Dumb"
The fact is that "cway" did not respond to that part of my post. He like you had no answer. Do you ever think before you post? No. Thought so.
Peace
PS: The thought of the murder of innocents is disgusting, but, the United States should not try to be the worlds policeman. We do not do it well and should not get involved in sectarian wars.
Caught in yet another lie, you try to change the subject.

I had no answer? Funny, you are complaining about my response.
Grampy

South Windsor, CT

#657243 Jun 6, 2012
LOL wrote:
<quoted text>
Holder's ass is in a sling ...
About now Holder's workload triples. The next 6 months will be 20 hour workdays auctioning pardons. Who's going to donate any money to build a library for the this Loser in Chief, Obama.

Since: May 11

Aspers, PA

#657244 Jun 6, 2012
the westerner wrote:
I believe davey boy has some kind of learning disability:
Just the facts, ma'm:
The unvarnished truth, part 2:
The current mortgage crisis came about in large part because of Clinton-era government pressure on lenders to make risky loans in order to “make homeownership more affordable for lower-income Americans and those with a poor credit history,” the DC Examiner notes today.“Those steps encouraged riskier mortgage lending by minimizing the role of credit histories in lending decisions, loosening required debt-to-equity ratios to allow borrowers to make small or even no down payments at all, and encouraging lenders the use of floating or adjustable interest-rate mortgages, including those with low ‘teasers.’”
The liberal Village Voice previously chronicled how Clinton Administration housing secretary Andrew Cuomo helped spawn the mortgage crisis through his pressure on lenders to promote affordable housing and diversity.“Andrew Cuomo, the youngest Housing and Urban Development secretary in history, made a series of decisions between 1997 and 2001 that gave birth to the country’s current crisis. He took actions that—in combination with many other factors—helped plunge Fannie and Freddie into the subprime markets without putting in place the means to monitor their increasingly risky investments.
He turned the Federal Housing Administration mortgage program into a sweetheart lender with sky-high loan ceilings and no money down, and he legalized what a federal judge has branded ‘kickbacks’ to brokers that have fueled the sale of overpriced and unsupportable loans. Three to four million families are now facing foreclosure, and Cuomo is one of the reasons why.”(See Wayne Barrett,“Andrew Cuomo and Fannie and Freddie: How the Youngest Housing and Urban Development Secretary in History Gave Birth to the Mortgage Crisis,” Village Voice, August 5, 2008).
Investors Business Daily had an editorial yesterday about how another federal “law designed to encourage minority homeownership” also contributed to the mortgage crisis by pressuring lenders to make risky loans..
Not the CRA excuse.

You right wingers really have nothing else to try to hide your party's involvement in creating this financial mess.
Amazed

Ocoee, FL

#657245 Jun 6, 2012
The manics were out in full force last night. I've checked all the news, looked out my window and all is well.

Had the gators on standby to be released into my moat. No need.

Have a Great Day.
Nobama

United States

#657246 Jun 6, 2012
Lily Boca Raton fl wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree,$20 million ! 75% from outside the state. Thanks Supreme Court for selling our country to the corporations. People be damned. Why vote?
are you accusing the voters of Wisconsin of accepting cash to change their votes???...

Since: May 11

Aspers, PA

#657247 Jun 6, 2012
DBWriter wrote:
<quoted text>
So, you think the person who wrote this is a goddam idiot, right?
Tenzing wrote:
<quoted text>
... and I'll say the same to you if Romney wins.
We'll have to start a new thread:
Mitt Romney, our next President.
I'll start:
Yep.
People don't care. They just wanted a white president. Period.
You're right, they have no one to blame but themselves when the debt skyrockets and military spending spins out of control. War with Iran, intervention in Syria.
They are actually happy that they have put this country in danger.
That person was mocking dumbasses like you.
Amazed

Ocoee, FL

#657248 Jun 6, 2012
Nobama wrote:
<quoted text>
how do you explain the fact that a high percentage of government union members in Wisconsin have opted out of membership when given the choice???...
are you against "choice"???...
That's very simple, they like the benefits of a union, but can get it for free.

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#657249 Jun 6, 2012
carol wrote:
<quoted text>
On the contrary, everything I post as fact is backed up with a source.
Unless you or RealDave can prove Karl Rove has made statements using the same tactics as Alinsky and his followers, both of you are just flapping your gums.
Bull, you're discredited daily. Maybe this is a contributing factor:

When News Is Propaganda
By Jordan Bloom • May 23, 2012

The video age has sped up our cognitive powers. We get to the point faster.… People who watch the evening news see entire South American cities collapse under earthquakes in sixty seconds or less. So if you’re just talking for sixty seconds, you’d better be good and interesting.
—Roger Ailes, 1989

“I hope you enjoyed that fancy burger, Mr. President.”

Less than four months after President Obama was sworn in, Sean Hannity was knocking his choice of mustard.

The story hit Fox News Channel’s prime-time lineup in the spring of 2009 after ricocheting around local news blogs and MSNBC earlier that day, and it became a partisan Rorschach test: liberals saw common-man appeal in Obama’s visit to the faddish environs of Ray’s Hell Burger in Arlington, Virginia—where one can order a patty topped with foie gras—while conservatives thought the opposite: elitist snob!

Trying to place exactly when cable news lost its mind is futile, but this is as good a place to start as any:“Burgergate” has become typical of 21st-century cable news. The story was trivial, but it compactly illustrated how Fox and MSNBC have calibrated their partisanship over the last several years.

Since 2008, even though each major party is now represented by a cable news channel—MSNBC for Democrats, Fox News for Republicans—the range of opinion allowed on air has become narrower than Sean Hannity’s taste in burger toppings.

On Fox, this has meant more hosts and contributors from the GOP establishment who can be relied on for talking points and well-spun analysis; people like Karl Rove, or former Bush press secretary Dana Perino, now a host for “The Five.” Divergent views are out: Hannity’s liberal co-host Alan Colmes left their show in 2008, while the idiosyncratic Glenn Beck was booted from the network last year.

MSNBC maintains a token conservative presence, but the network’s leftward drift has made it all the more responsive to activist groups’ demands for political correctness. Most recently, emboldened by their success in removing Beck from Fox—he became “a bit of a branding issue,” said Roger Ailes, which reveals less about Beck’s unpopularity than the network’s ideological purity—the gendarmerie of acceptable opinion, led by Media Matters and Color of Change, claimed the scalp of Pat Buchanan over alleged racism in his book The Suicide of a Superpower.

To many on the right, the downfall of Beck and Buchanan seems proof positive of the multicultural left’s power to crush dissent. But as Ailes’s remark suggests, network interests in streamlined branding played as big a role.

Buchanan was a holdover from the old days of MSNBC, before president Phil Griffin proclaimed the network,“the place to go for progressives,” and he seemed as out of place among lightweight Republican contributors like Meghan McCain and Michael Steele as he did next to liberals like Rachel Maddow.

During an interview with the Hoover Institution’s Peter Robinson weeks after his break with the network, Buchanan revealed,“I knew the book would be controversial. The fact it caused my departure from MSNBC, I’ll let people decide whether that says something about my book, or something about MSNBC.”

“Breaking it down into the MSNBC versus Fox thing [actually] reflects what’s in that book, which is the division, polarization, divorce, and separation of Americans from Americans,” Buchanan continued.“A racist back when I was growing up was Bull Connor shooting fire hoses at folks. Now you can hear that comment on cable TV all the time, people just throw it out there.”

Cont...

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#657250 Jun 6, 2012
“I find many of Pat’s views to be abhorrent, but the best answer is to counter Pat and prove him wrong, not to silence him,” Buchanan’s former co-host Bill Press told TAC. Liberal MSNBC host Chris Matthews also spoke up for him after the incident.

But Buchanan was a poor fit for MSNBC’s progressive brand, and L. Brent Bozell III, president of the Media Research Center, wonders if his voice had been lost on the network’s left-wing viewership.

“I just don’t know what he was doing for the cause; I don’t say that as a criticism, I say that as someone who is in awe of that man’s mind, and I want to see greater exposure for him.… I think it’s a tragedy, he didn’t deserve it, and I’m glad he’s not there.”

But should commentators only address an audience on their own side—and should they side so closely with parties and movements in the first place?

“Aside from the emergence and dominance of social media, the biggest change I’ve seen in my media career, both on television and radio, is the tribalization of political debate,” says Press, former host of MSNBC’s “Buchanan and Press” and CNN’s “Crossfire,” the first point-counterpoint cable news show.“It used to be, you seldom saw a liberal without a conservative by his side, and vice versa. But no longer. Today, it’s either all right or all left. In prime time, neither MSNBC nor Current TV makes any attempt to include a conservative point of view. And Fox, with rare exceptions, slams its doors on liberals.”

Journalists who fall outside the two-party schematic are pushed to the margins. Libertarians like John Stossel, who with 19 Emmys has won more awards than the entire Fox News network, are relegated to ratings oblivion on the Fox Business Channel. In February when FBC cancelled its entire prime-time lineup, the only other libertarian with a regular slot on cable, Judge Andrew Napolitano, was edged out and consigned to a contributor’s role.

The network cited business constraints and poor ratings as the reasons for the shake-up, but the effect has been to silence controversial opinions on civil liberties, foreign intervention, and the drug war.

It was not always thus. Before “Crossfire,” and before cable, there was “Firing Line,” the venerable discussion program hosted by William F. Buckley Jr. The show’s extended debate format probably had a lot to do with why the show moved to public television in the early 1970s.“Firing Line” didn’t just permit guests to defend their personal views, it required them to do so. Everyone got a fair exposition and an unreserved rebuttal, and if Allen Ginsberg wanted to make his point by singing “Hare Krishna” while accompanying himself on harmonium, so be it.

Today unpredictability is out; demographic targeting is in. Competition drives this process, but to what degree are cable news companies competing—and to what degree are they cultivating new, narrower monopolies? Rupert Murdoch correctly saw that conservatives were an underserved market in the media environment of 20 years ago. MSNBC now strives to match Fox’s partisan intensity.

Cable news is more or less a lost cause, argues Clay Johnson is in his book The Information Diet.“Instead of having to do your own research and your own homework, television does that for you, which is a huge convenience,” says Johnson, an open-government activist and co-founder of the firm that managed Barack Obama’s online campaign in 2008.“The grocery store does a lot of meat preparation; nobody wants to butcher their own cows. I think that’s what makes television extremely convenient.”

So why has the left sometimes seemed better—if not by much—at getting independent, non-establishment voices on television? How could Buchanan last as long as he did?

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#657251 Jun 6, 2012
“Basically, I look at Fox News as a disruptive technology—that Roger Ailes invented a new manufacturing process for news. It’s something that MSNBC has only recently begun to catch up on. While the left can bring in interesting people, it’s really that the left is still figuring out which products sell better than others.”



There’s more at stake in the ideological branding of today’s cable news than ratings or pundits’ careers. The more complex or controversial an issue, the more it suffers from the networks’ stereotyping. Nowhere is this more obvious than in international affairs.

Since CNN broadcast some of the opening volleys in the first Gulf War, the history of cable news has been inextricably tied to foreign conflict. War is a godsend for the networks. The public sits at home in rapt patriotism while the network brings on experts who speculate about minute details and strategies in language with just enough jargon to sound convincing.

The elephant in the room—the advertising and viewership benefits of war—has never been acknowledged by any of the three networks. But they regularly censor antiwar voices.

“There is little room for an antiwar point of view, either from the left or right, on television today,” says Press, whose show on MSNBC was cancelled because he and co-host Buchanan were both against the Iraq War. He criticizes the media’s failure to question government assertions about military operations.

“It did not do so in Vietnam, the first Gulf War, nor the war in Iraq. For the most part, reporters just recycled propaganda coming out of the White House and helped the White House sell war after war to the American people. Also networks mainly book cheerleaders for the war—because they’re afraid of being dubbed ‘anti-American.’”

“That was clearly a show where there was debate,” says Jeff Cohen, founder of the liberal media watchdog Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting and a producer at MSNBC when “Buchanan & Press” was on the air.“It was often Buchanan and Press against two interventionists. That show didn’t last. One by one the voices of reason, the ones that turned out to be right on Iraq, were silenced.”

Uncritical coverage of the Iraq War was a product of either fear and cowardice or opportunism. At least in the case of MSNBC’s “Donahue,” where Cohen was senior producer, that’s perfectly clear. An internal NBC memo warned that antiwar host Phil Donahue might be a “difficult public face for NBC in a time of war.”

“We were still the top-rated show” at the time, says Cohen, and “if we could have been the one show that allowed moderate voices and noninterventionist voices, we would have been huge.” But network executives “were less interested in ratings than in tamping down controversy.”

“As it got closer to the invasion day, they clamped down on our program more and more with edicts that came down from management that we had to have more pro-war views than anti-invasion views. What that resulted in—and I think management was happy about this—was that the hawks seemed to outshout the voices of reason that were arguing we should wait.”

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#657252 Jun 6, 2012
Cable news today perpetuates a vicious circle: critical views of American foreign policy are unrepresented in the leadership of either party, and producers are reluctant to air opinions perceived as out of the mainstream. Nobody was eager to book Ron Paul before 2007. But as the Texas congressman showed in the GOP debates that year, once views such as his get a hearing, they can be galvanizing. Without being included in forums like the presidential debates—glorified cable news shows—antiwar and realist dissidents have little chance to influence their parties. The Internet is changing that, but not fast enough.

What’s true for foreign affairs is true for other difficult subjects as well, such as the nation’s economic crisis. Instead of challenging viewers, ideologically segregated networks reinforce what their audiences think they already know. Eventually consumers of the news may really believe that they’re more interested in things like President Obama’s choice of mustard than in the real problems that cable is so good at distracting us from. Perhaps this is the way the cable news world ends. Not with a bang, but with a burger.

Jordan Bloom is associate editor of The American Conservative.

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articl...

Since: May 11

Aspers, PA

#657253 Jun 6, 2012
Nobama wrote:
<quoted text>
are you accusing the voters of Wisconsin of accepting cash to change their votes???...
Money wins. This has been shown over & over in that the candidate the spends the most typically wins.

Republicans think this is the way for our country to decide elections. Allow a few wealthy people pick our politicians.

Proof is that the Republicans went with the Republican Party leadership pick & the money men pick.

Money bought Romney his primary win.

I guarantee that among all you right wingers posting here, Romney was not their pick. But like the sheep you are, you all Romney people now.
fred

Hamden, CT

#657254 Jun 6, 2012
RealDave wrote:
<quoted text>
That person was mocking dumbasses like you.
nah nah.. nah nah...nah nah... nah nah...hey hey hey...goodbye!

ps

44 states, 400+ electoral votes, filibuster proof senate...President Reagan...repeat victory..Carter....1980 landslide
new yawk

Buffalo, NY

#657255 Jun 6, 2012
It's akin to a Court Room tactic during a Legal Procedure.

The Attorney throws out information, in the guise of or couched in the form of a question < for the jury's benefit >, and even if it is objected to and sustained, that information is already planted in the jurors' minds. Like opening Pandora's Box, can't take it back. It's a very slick move considering The Attorney is not really seeking or expecting an answer and already knows it will be objected, sustained, stricken from the record and the jurors are instructed to disregard the question/information.

Yeah, slick Willy.
carol wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree with LOL. "The first message is what he really believes (Obama sucks) and then he covers up his message."
It's not the first time he has done this.

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#657256 Jun 6, 2012
JEB wrote:
<quoted text>
Brave typist
Miss, when the soldiers are in combat spilling their blood will you be at your typewriter?
Yes, where she's always been.
fred

Hamden, CT

#657257 Jun 6, 2012
sonicfilter wrote:
<quoted text>
Indoctrinate your children at Tea Party summer camp!
http://www.salon.com/2011/06/14/tea_party_sum...
Better Band. No fascism involved.
nah nah.. nah nah...nah nah... nah nah...hey hey hey...goodbye!

ps

44 states, 400+ electoral votes, filibuster proof senate...President Reagan...repeat victory..Carter....1980 landslide
fred

Hamden, CT

#657258 Jun 6, 2012
Lily Boca Raton fl wrote:
<quoted text>
You rightwingers aren't bright enough to understand that Bill Clinton is fcking with your heads
Yea..Bill's stabbing teh lizard in the back is really confusing us. pfft

ps

nah nah.. nah nah...nah nah... nah nah...hey hey hey...goodbye!

pps

44 states, 400+ electoral votes, filibuster proof senate...President Reagan...repeat victory..Carter....1980 landslide
fred

Hamden, CT

#657259 Jun 6, 2012
RealDave wrote:
<quoted text>
Money wins. This has been shown over & over in that the candidate the spends the most typically wins.
Republicans think this is the way for our country to decide elections. Allow a few wealthy people pick our politicians.
Proof is that the Republicans went with the Republican Party leadership pick & the money men pick.
Money bought Romney his primary win.
I guarantee that among all you right wingers posting here, Romney was not their pick. But like the sheep you are, you all Romney people now.
Good. Corporations are going pulverize the Kenyan lizard's communist coup with billions in 7x24 negative ads.

Yeaaa!

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#657260 Jun 6, 2012
RealDave wrote:
<quoted text>
That person was mocking dumbasses like you.
Its a given that someone like you would get it and that DBWriter would be cluefu cked.

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