No end in sight to 'war on women' att...

No end in sight to 'war on women' attacks

There are 332 comments on the Politico story from Nov 10, 2013, titled No end in sight to 'war on women' attacks. In it, Politico reports that:

Hardly a commercial break went by in October when Virginia voters weren't reminded of Ken Cuccinelli's far-right views on abortion and other social issues.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Politico.

Ink

Havertown, PA

#204 Nov 14, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
And yes, another point goes sailing right OVER your empty little head.
He asked for the law saying it was legal. I answered that it wasn't necessary, because if something is not declared illegal then it is, in fact legal.
Okay, it's time to give your one remaining brain cell some more oxygen.
Breathe in.......and breathe out.
So he should have asked when was it declared illegal after being legal and then of course deemed legal again. And now partially legal. And soon-----

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#205 Nov 14, 2013
Ink wrote:
<quoted text>
So he should have asked when was it declared illegal after being legal and then of course deemed legal again. And now partially legal. And soon-----
You're still not getting it. I'm sorry you're so dumb.
Ink

Havertown, PA

#206 Nov 14, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
You're still not getting it. I'm sorry you're so dumb.
You have no sense of humor. Your legal status , made illegal, then legal again and now soon to be partially illegal again isn't much to get your teeth into. You have every right to be nervous about the legal status of abortion. It isn't as popular as it was.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#207 Nov 14, 2013
Ink wrote:
<quoted text>
You have no sense of humor. Your legal status , made illegal, then legal again and now soon to be partially illegal again isn't much to get your teeth into. You have every right to be nervous about the legal status of abortion. It isn't as popular as it was.
You're still missing the point.

I'm not nervous.
2 posts removed
Danielle

Brisbane, Australia

#210 Nov 14, 2013
Who wants to have sex
1 post removed
Chicopee

New Fairfield, CT

#212 Nov 14, 2013
Buffalo Bull wrote:
<quoted text>
First off thank you for a well thought out set of questions, The approach that you used , is appreciated.
I will admit that using Cuba as a comparison is something of a red herring. However Canada and England are valid comparisons as integrated, industrialized nations.
I am quoting 2010 statistics
----------
Here are the cost figures
USA.......$8,233 per capita... 17.6% of GDP
Canada .$4,445..........11.4%
England $3,433..........9.6%
This is cut and dried we pay double England as represented by GDP
Also let look at 2007 figures to compare the rate of inflation in medical care.
USA 2007 per capita....$7,290
Canada..........3,895
England..........2,998
With no doubt the rate of increase in USA' cost per capita is far greater
----------
% of population that is caucasian
USA 72.4%...Canada 76.7%...England...85%
As you can see the Demographics of Canada are not radically different from our own. The mix of minority groups is different. The African American population is greater in the USA and as you point out there are diseases related to this ethnic group. In Canada the Native American population which has shorter life spans than other ethnic groups is more than doubled what the USA % is.
----------
You are correct that various factors such as murder rate do have and impact on medical results..However you also mentioned obesity rates which are a measure of medical results. Thus pointing to obesity illustrates that we lag in preventative medicine.
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2012/10/s...
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2012/10/h...
I will break down and post the cost drivers that are inherent in our system
I've looked the infant mortality rates in the U.S. v. other countries on more than one occasion.

The higher ratio of African decent in the U.S. is a big factor, as is teen pregnancy.

The other factor is that all these countries do not calculate infant mortality v. miscarriage the same way. Canada uses a calculated weight measure, as does Japan, though they are not the same. Germany, a size (length) measure. Other countries use a measure of weeks, though there is no uniformity there, either.

Back in 2010 or 2011, I found a study that used a uniform measure for all of the listed industrialized countries. The U.S. still had the highest mortality rate, but the gap was greatly reduced.

Obesity is not a medical condition that can be controlled or addressed with medicine (if only!). This is often a behavioral or addiction based condition. So I'm not sure how you correlate that to lagging in preventative medicine, particularly since the U.S. delivers better treatment for hypertension, one of the more common medical conditions in cases of obesity and a leading cause of heart attacks and strokes.

But I know Canadians are a lot thinner than we are here in the U.S., because I'm tiny myself and tall for my size. It has always been a struggle to find clothing that fits me here in the States, but my husband and I travel frequently to Ontario and Quebec, where clothes in my size are easy to find. Expensive, but easy to find. How they stay thinner is a mystery, because the food up there is FANTASTIC, especially in Montreal. I'd be the size of a house if I lived there. But I digress.
Chicopee

New Fairfield, CT

#213 Nov 14, 2013
Buffalo Bull wrote:
<quoted text>
What drives the rate of increase in health care costs (in the United States)
----------
1) Free for service reimbursement...This is a system of payments unheard of elsewhere. It's best explained this way...
In Canada the cost of setting a broken leg in Hamilton by Dr. Smith is lets pick a price...$1,000...In Fort Erie the cost of setting a broken leg by Dr. Jones is $1,000...Baring complications there is no allowable difference in compensation...If Dr. Smith wishes to make more money he will have to find efficiencies with in his practice
In the United State there are different compensation based on how the patient is insured. And the Dr. is not given a fee for he whole job, but he is compensated for each part of the job. He will receive addition compensation per visit, per x-ray , per prescription...Thus is Dr. Smith wants a bigger pay day all he need do is schedule an extra visit , or X-ray or script....Thus a Canadian doctors search for additional compensation drives him to become more efficient, he his desire for a bigger paycheck drives him to be more expensive
2) The piecemeal buying of insurance. A un-arguable rule in the insurance industry the larger the risk pool the lower the costs. This is unique to the USA in Canada the provence of Ontario is the risk pool, hence a larger pool.
3) Rapid consolidation of providers. As a larger risk reduces cost a consolidated provider pool enables the providers to set the re-imbursements. If a Health Care conglomerate owns 50% of the hospital space in a given geographical area that conglomerate set prices. The larger the conglomerate the greater it's ability to set prices.

5) Legal, The malpractice cost factor is significant in the USA and is added an exact figure is not possible to calculate , because of the atomized nature of the health care system, these number will vary from doctor to doctor.
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2012/10/s...
Dang! I cleared my desk over the weekend and just threw away notes and website addresses from a number of comparative studies I had found about six weeks ago. I will attempt to find them again.

There are some factors that weren't addressed in your post, such as the basic difference in our delivery system.

Here in the U.S., we have far more choice than those in countries with single payer systems. We perform significantly higher rates (up to 80% in some categories) of elective surgeries and procedures, and this is, in part, due to our individual insurance coverage. It has been summarized that many would opt out of unnecessary procedures if they had to pay more for them.

We use our higher per capita rate of diagnostic testing equipment, especially MRI and CT scanners, for conditions and injuries that would otherwise merit a wait and see approach, and do far more injury related surgeries for conditions that would heal just as well, albeit more slowly, without any surgery at all.

We do far more preventative testing, such as cancer screenings, mammograms, pap smears, PSA screenings and colonoscopies. This is also due to our higher ratio of machinery per capita.

We are the best in the world at cancer treatment, with a higher cure rate/positive outcome than any other country. The downside of that is that the U.S. is far more likely to treat such illnesses even when there is zero probability of a positive outcome.

And while you did address malpractice, this is actually a huge factor.

Doctors in the U.S. practice defensive medicine by necessity, performing far more unnecessary tests and procedures than doctors in other countries due to the fear of malpractice suits.
Chicopee

New Fairfield, CT

#214 Nov 15, 2013
Morgana 9 wrote:
<quoted text>
I am not sure if you have had health insurance at any point in your life, BUT, group coverage covers a wide variety of medical issues and prescriptions. It is group coverage. Most insurance policies are equated to a group. Medicare is based on the same principal...group coverage.
I've had insurance for nearly my whole life. Due to the different jobs both my husband and I have had, we've changed insurance coverage frequently.

Availability of different plans varies greatly from state to state and I've had more than one job that offered different packages that varied by price and coverage.

The self insured had even more options here in Ct. So, there have been instances when we could pick and choose how much coverage or what coverage we wanted. They're all group coverage plans, but some plans drop a lot of options for lower prices, but usually higher out of pocket costs.

With the ACA, we're all going to have to be covered for everything.
Chicopee

New Fairfield, CT

#215 Nov 15, 2013
Buffalo Bull wrote:
<quoted text>
What drives the rate of increase in health care costs (in the United States)
----------
4) The fact that in the USA 16.9% are uninsured raises costs. The uninsured are virtually certain to not pay or to pay only a % of the total cost of their care. The outstanding costs are passed on to the insured, pure and simple. In additions the cost of caring for the uninsured is greater, because there is a lack of preventive medicine and small condition are allowed to fester.
Forgive me for shortening your post.

I've not been able to find any statistics concerning the uninsured, aside from the percentage of uninsured and the amount the government pays out to cover them.

I know that illegal aliens are counted in this percentage. I wouldn't be at all surprised to find that this group almost virtually pays 0% for health care services they receive, especially at hospitals.

The uninsured are also charged a much higher rate than those with insurance, particularly at hospitals. Insurance companies typically pay between 40% and 50% of original billing. The uninsured are required to pay 100% of original billing, except in some states that mandate a 30% reduction for the uninsured. They still pay more than the insured.

The uninsured also get burned by billing practices many hospitals use, namely 'coding'. Insurance companies review coded charges (I have some of these code charts at work, though we're not supposed to). Coding is how people get charged for a gross of, as an example, 600 mg Motrin, even though they only received one pill at the ER. Or charged $750 for physician services, which might cover eighteen different services that an attending physician could provide, but only received two of the eighteen within that code. Insurance companies weed these extraneous charges out. The uninsured are not availed to do so.

Many hospitals get fined when they're caught doing this, and the fines are steep. Sadly, our local hospital is among the top ten abusers in the country. But since the state gets paid every time they're caught, there is little initiative to put a stop to this practice, though one of our Senators did try a few years ago (Senator Leiberman, CT). No one on the Hill seemed to care.

Many doctors (including some that I've worked for) charge the uninsured less, due to the fact that there are almost no administrative costs, no insurance forms, little data entry, no calls back and forth, etc..(Administrators spend a great deal of our time arguing with insurance companies to get them to cover what they should). It's calculated that $17 dollars of every doctor office visit is spent on administrative costs (CT.).

I've worked in the medical field on and off for years, and know that many uninsured do actually pay there bills. I was wondering if you have any statistics that break down who pays and who doesn't.

Morgana 9

“And the Horse You Rode in On”

Since: Sep 08

Minneapolis

#216 Nov 15, 2013
Chicopee wrote:
<quoted text>
I've had insurance for nearly my whole life. Due to the different jobs both my husband and I have had, we've changed insurance coverage frequently.
Availability of different plans varies greatly from state to state and I've had more than one job that offered different packages that varied by price and coverage.
The self insured had even more options here in Ct. So, there have been instances when we could pick and choose how much coverage or what coverage we wanted. They're all group coverage plans, but some plans drop a lot of options for lower prices, but usually higher out of pocket costs.
With the ACA, we're all going to have to be covered for everything.
They are all still group plans. Not personalized plans, Of all my years of working I have never seen a group plan that did not cover maternity. All plans were the same with only one option. In the past few years the plans of changed in my work place. They are all the same with the exception of pay more, lower deductible, pay less higher deductible and the coinsurance varies depending on what you pay.

Since: Aug 12

Buffalo, NY

#217 Nov 15, 2013
Chicopee wrote:
<quoted text>
Forgive me for shortening your post.
I've not been able to find any statistics concerning the uninsured, aside from the percentage of uninsured and the amount the government pays out to cover them.
I know that illegal aliens are counted in this percentage. I wouldn't be at all surprised to find that this group almost virtually pays 0% for health care services they receive, especially at hospitals.
The uninsured are also charged a much higher rate than those with insurance, particularly at hospitals. Insurance companies typically pay between 40% and 50% of original billing. The uninsured are required to pay 100% of original billing, except in some states that mandate a 30% reduction for the uninsured. They still pay more than the insured.
The uninsured also get burned by billing practices many hospitals use, namely 'coding'. Insurance companies review coded charges (I have some of these code charts at work, though we're not supposed to). Coding is how people get charged for a gross of, as an example, 600 mg Motrin, even though they only received one pill at the ER. Or charged $750 for physician services, which might cover eighteen different services that an attending physician could provide, but only received two of the eighteen within that code. Insurance companies weed these extraneous charges out. The uninsured are not availed to do so.
Many hospitals get fined when they're caught doing this, and the fines are steep. Sadly, our local hospital is among the top ten abusers in the country. But since the state gets paid every time they're caught, there is little initiative to put a stop to this practice, though one of our Senators did try a few years ago (Senator Leiberman, CT). No one on the Hill seemed to care.
Many doctors (including some that I've worked for) charge the uninsured less, due to the fact that there are almost no administrative costs, no insurance forms, little data entry, no calls back and forth, etc..(Administrators spend a great deal of our time arguing with insurance companies to get them to cover what they should). It's calculated that $17 dollars of every doctor office visit is spent on administrative costs (CT.).
I've worked in the medical field on and off for years, and know that many uninsured do actually pay there bills. I was wondering if you have any statistics that break down who pays and who doesn't.
i am not certain how many uninsured consume what services and how many hours of doctor time
http://www.allhealth.org/issues.asp...
an excellent site and even here they can only give educated estates but with 50 million uninsured even if each used only $250 worth of services they have take $50 FROM YOU..
You know that they will take far more with ainjury or ill ness that has some kind of extended care attached to it so I assume that if 17% of the population is uninsured than, up to 17% of my cost is used to support them..that is at least $1000 per year from my cost alone ($8,500 per capita) My family of four pays more tan that number...
And that is why including them in the pool and making them pay premimums or fine...saves me more money than any tax cut ...having those people pay will put a fkking $1000 in your pocket....
damn...
makes a lot of sense to me

Since: Aug 12

Buffalo, NY

#218 Nov 15, 2013
Chicopee wrote:
<quoted text>
Dang! I cleared my desk over the weekend and just threw away notes and website addresses from a number of comparati......... probability of a positive outcome.
And while you did address malpractice, this is actually a huge factor.
Doctors in the U.S. practice defensive medicine by necessity, performing far more unnecessary tests and procedures than doctors in other countries due to the fear of malpractice suits.
We are using the same assumptions.... if you take all the un needed tests and doctors time that are used in defensive medicine... and consider that, with the insured that practice is nearly unchecked in a fee for service environment and you can assume the loss is enormous although, a quantifiable figure is not available as far as i know .
If quality service can be delivered in Canada for a tad more than 1\2 of our costs,, and cover every one...
Then even if we can save 1\2 that figure through requiring insurance from the uninsured, expanding the risk pool thus lowering premimums and through tort reform i can save that $1000 that i posted to previously
incredulous

Carmel, IN

#219 Nov 15, 2013
Buffalo Bull wrote:
<quoted text>
First off you never give a source for anything you claim
I make my money in the stock market, that's why i can afford to waste time here..
how about you do you work?
Where does your insurance come from?
SOME PROFIT MARGINS
Apple...20%
Ford.....3.5%
A strong bank...20 %
Guess retail....6.7%
SOME HEALTH CARE PROFIT MARGINS
Amgen bio-tech...30.6%
Gilead Bio Tech......37.6%
Hospital real estate trust ( the largest hospital landlord)...24.5%
United insurance...4.1%
Well point..........4%
Average for
First year doctors $175k - to $275k for specialists
after 6 years the compensation for specialist can raise up to $625k
do you care when and where you are wrong.
And what are your sources for this.....the Communist Journal? No doubt you sit at home stewing over people's profit margins and no doubt you continue to be clueless. For one thing, first year doctors average much less than $175,000 their first year. GP's and Family Practioners are usually the least. Considering their peers have made hundreds of thousands and perhaps millions while they have been in school(Not to mention their debt).......I'd say their compensation is barely acceptable. There is a reason we have a doctor shortage. You are a simple fool who pretends to be someone special when you are really a jealous loser and mooch who expects taxpayers to pay your way. No doubt you clean a broker's latrine and nothing more.

Since: Aug 12

Buffalo, NY

#220 Nov 15, 2013
incredulous wrote:
<quoted text> And what are your sources for this.....the Communist Journal? No doubt you sit at home stewing over people's profit margins and no doubt you continue to be clueless. For one thing, first year doctors average much less than $175,000 their first year. GP's and Family Practioners are usually the least. Considering their peers have made hundreds of thousands and perhaps millions while they have been in school(Not to mention their debt).......I'd say their compensation is barely acceptable. There is a reason we have a doctor shortage. You are a simple fool who pretends to be someone special when you are really a jealous loser and mooch who expects taxpayers to pay your way. No doubt you clean a broker's latrine and nothing more.
Your brain need not tire it's self you have the answers already thus,
There is nothing I can do for you, you are a complete...
put a dab of vasoline behind each of your ears it will help if you should ever attempt to pull your head out od your azz
incredulous

Carmel, IN

#221 Nov 15, 2013
Morgana 9 wrote:
<quoted text>
They are all still group plans. Not personalized plans, Of all my years of working I have never seen a group plan that did not cover maternity. All plans were the same with only one option. In the past few years the plans of changed in my work place. They are all the same with the exception of pay more, lower deductible, pay less higher deductible and the coinsurance varies depending on what you pay.
Many groups offer plans with and without maternity so people don't have to spend more on a policy for coverages they don't need. Even indiv. policies are set up to include or exclude maternity.In the past, some policies didn't cover bc pills although that's changing. There was a time when people had some choices on how they could bring down the costs of their premiums. Why pay for maternity when you won't need it? That's an extremely costly perk to a policy.
incredulous

Carmel, IN

#222 Nov 15, 2013
Buffalo Bull wrote:
<quoted text>
We are using the same assumptions.... if you take all the un needed tests and doctors time that are used in defensive medicine... and consider that, with the insured that practice is nearly unchecked in a fee for service environment and you can assume the loss is enormous although, a quantifiable figure is not available as far as i know .
If quality service can be delivered in Canada for a tad more than 1\2 of our costs,, and cover every one...
Then even if we can save 1\2 that figure through requiring insurance from the uninsured, expanding the risk pool thus lowering premimums and through tort reform i can save that $1000 that i posted to previously
You are so clueless, it hurts. Society doesn't need the stupid dictatting to them how they should receive their health care.
incredulous

Carmel, IN

#223 Nov 15, 2013
dictating
Oh and one more thing:The Deceptive Income of Physicians
Doctors do not make as much money as you think
By Benjamin Brown, M.D.
with 937 comments
Physicians spend about 40,000 hours training and over $300,000 on their education, yet the amount of money they earn per hour is only a few dollars more than a high school teacher. Physicians spend over a decade of potential earning, saving and investing time training and taking on more debt, debt that isn’t tax deductible. When they finish training and finally have an income – they are taxed heavily and must repay their debt with what remains. The cost of tuition, the length of training and the U.S. tax code places physicians into a deceptive financial situation.
The road to becoming a licensed and board certified physician is a long one. Physicians spend the equivalent of 20 years of full-time work just learning how to be a physician. First, one must earn a bachelor’s degree. Attending college full time, this will take about four years or 6,400 hours of work. 4 years x 40 wks/yr x 40 hrs/wk = 6,400 hours. To be competitive for acceptance into medical school you will likely spend far more than 40 hours per week studying, doing research and volunteering. However, to keep it simple and consistent we will neglect that extra time. After college future physicians must attend medical school. Medical students spend about 80 hours per week for 48 weeks each year studying and training which amounts to 15,360 hours over four years. After medical school, physicians must complete post-graduate training known as residency. To practice medicine in the United States physicians must pass all 3 parts of the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE©) and complete at least the first year of residency, which is known as internship. Residents work long hours, weekends, nights and holidays. Most approach the legal work hour limit of 80 hrs/wk for 50 weeks each year. Many residents exceed 80 hrs/wk studying and doing research in addition to their clinical responsibilities. To become board certified, future physicians must complete an entire residency-training program and pass all additional exams for that particular specialty. For example, to become board certified in Internal Medicine, one must graduate from medical school, pass all 3 USMLEs, complete a 3-year Internal Medicine residency and pass the Internal Medicine board exam. A board certified Internal Medicine physician will spend about 34,000 hours training. To become board certified in Thoracic Surgery – one must graduate from medical school, pass all 3 USMLEs, complete a 5-year General Surgery residency, complete a 2-year thoracic surgery fellowship and pass the Thoracic Surgery board exams. A board-certified Thoracic Surgeon will spend about 49,760 hours training. The shortest residency training programs are 3 years long and include the primary care specialties of Internal Medicine, Family Medicine and Pediatrics.
Spending 40,000 hours of one’s young adult life learning how to be a physician is an admirable sacrifice, especially considering one must spend more money than one earns to work those 40,000 hours. The long hours don’t necessarily end after residency. In 2007, physicians from over 20 specialties were asked how many hours per week they generally work – the average was 59.6 hours per week.1 So even after physicians finish their 40,000 hours of training they continue to work one-and-a-half times as much most Americans for the rest of their career. In short, physicians work two-full time jobs while in training and one-and-a-half full time jobs when they are finished. They have to work nights, evenings, weekends, holidays and take call. For most physicians, there is no such thing as overtime or holiday pay.
incredulous

Carmel, IN

#224 Nov 15, 2013
Why does it have to take so long?
There are no shortcuts to gaining the knowledge and experience one needs to be a competent physician, they need to put in the time to get the experience. Because there is no shortcut to gaining the experience one needs to be a competent physician, decreasing resident work hours from 80 hours per week to 60 hours per week is a terrible idea. If such a change occurs, residency training would have to become years longer in order to get the same experience. Making physician training longer will further increase student debt loads and decrease the number of years physicians are able to work after they are trained. It will increase the number of physicians in training and decrease the physician workforce.
Becoming a physician is expensive. For the 2009-2010 academic year, the average total student budget for public and private undergraduate universities was $19,338 and $39,028, respectively.2 If one attends an average priced institution, receives subsided loans and graduates in four years they will have about $100,000 of student loan debt from college. For the 2009-2010 academic year, the median cost of tuition and fees for public and private medical schools was $24,384 and $43,002 per year, respectively.3 This does not include the cost of rent, utilities, food, transportation, health insurance, books, professional attire, licensing exams fees or residency interview expenses. Therefore, the average medical student budget is about $45,000 per year; $30,000 for tuition and $15,000 for living expenses. If one attends an average priced medical school, receives 1/3 subsidized loans and graduates in 4 years; at a 7% APR they will have $200,527 of debt from medical school at graduation. If one borrows $22,500 bi-annually and two-thirds of this accrues interest compounded bi-annually at 3.5%– their total student loan debt for both college and medical school will then be $300,527. Forbearing this debt through 5 years of residency and paying it off over 20 years will cost about $788,880 of one’s net income.
Loan repayment programs such as those offered by the military are not a solution for the majority. Each year, about 22,000 medical students graduate from U.S. allopathic and osteopathic medical schools.4,5 Each year the military matches 800 students into its residency training programs, because that is the military’s anticipated future need for physicians.

Since: Aug 12

Buffalo, NY

#225 Nov 15, 2013
incredulous

Carmel, IN

#226 Nov 15, 2013
The U.S. tax code allows taxpayers to deduct a maximum of $2,500 per year of student loan interest paid to their lender. This deduction is phased out between incomes of $115,000 and $145,000.6 Therefore, this benefit is of no help to most physicians. If one were to start a business, they could deduct nearly all of their expenses. Yet for unclear reasons, one cannot deduct the cost of becoming a physician; not the tuition or even the interest on the money they borrowed to pay their tuition.
During residency, if one makes payments of $1,753 per month, or $21,037 per year, to pay off the accruing interest, thier debt will be still be $300,527 at the end of residency. However, they will have spent $63,111 over the course of a 3 year residency or $126,222 over the course of a 6 year residency to keep their debt from growing. Though paying off the interest during residency is the responsible thing to do; coming up with $21,037 each year from one’s net pay of $40,000 may be quite difficult.
Time spent training, student loan debt and the U.S. tax code makes the income of physicians deceiving. A board certified internal medicine physician who is married with 2 children, living in California and earning the median internist annual salary of $205,441 will be left with $140,939 after income taxes and $106,571 after student loan payments.7 This is assuming a federal Income tax rate of 28%, California state income tax rate of 6.6%, Social Security tax rate of 6.2% and Medicare tax rate of 1.45%. You can go to www.paycheckcity.com to get an idea of what one’s net pay would be for different incomes, states of residence, marital status, number of children, etc. Paying off a debt of $369,425 over 20 years at a 7% APR will require annual payments of $34,368. Those student loan payments will continue to consume about $34,000 of their net income for 20 years until they are finally paid off. What started off as $300,527 in student loan debt will end up costing $687,360. This debt that consumes one-fourth of their net income for 20 years wasn’t accrued because they bought a house they couldn’t afford – it is because they chose to become a physician.
Believe it or not, the amount of money reaching a physician’s personal bank account per hour worked is only a few dollars more than that of a high school teacher.
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