Cyber school graduates face military'...

Cyber school graduates face military's bias

There are 42 comments on the The York Daily Record story from Feb 27, 2011, titled Cyber school graduates face military's bias. In it, The York Daily Record reports that:

Justin Merrill had wanted to join the military for as long as he could remember.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The York Daily Record.

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future hmmmm

York, PA

#1 Feb 28, 2011
I wonder how many businesses in the public sector look at a cyber diploma any different then a GED. Are we really doing our children favors promoting cyber schools. In other educational worthy countries are cyber school education so acceptable,
Pablo

New Holland, PA

#2 Feb 28, 2011
future hmmmm wrote:
I wonder how many businesses in the public sector look at a cyber diploma any different then a GED. Are we really doing our children favors promoting cyber schools. In other educational worthy countries are cyber school education so acceptable,
Cyber schools are a total scam.

You may learn doing online courses, but you are not getting an education.

You miss out on social interaction with other students, one-on-one interactions with teachers, and the value of being a member of a team. Brick and motor schools offer more than just classrooms. Experiencing pep rallies, sporting events, student council, marching band, or science fairs are all part of the experience.

Why do you think public/private school kids turn out more well rounded than homeschoolers?

In the military, you must live and work as a team which requires more than just the ability to study math or English
annoyed

Tomball, TX

#3 Feb 28, 2011
I cyber homeschooled my son last year for the fact he was gifted and moved way faster then the other children his age. He was 3 to 4 grades ahead of his peers in most subjects and up to 6 grade levels ahead in the others. In this age of technology its time for everyone, icluding the military to take a look at the education of the child and not just the status of being a "brick and mortar" school. Times have changed quickly and dramatically and we all need to adapt with it. I recently did place him back in the brick school, but only for financial reasons. I can not stay home daily with him.
George

Washington, DC

#4 Feb 28, 2011
annoyed wrote:
I cyber homeschooled my son last year for the fact he was gifted and moved way faster then the other children his age. He was 3 to 4 grades ahead of his peers in most subjects and up to 6 grade levels ahead in the others. In this age of technology its time for everyone, icluding the military to take a look at the education of the child and not just the status of being a "brick and mortar" school. Times have changed quickly and dramatically and we all need to adapt with it. I recently did place him back in the brick school, but only for financial reasons. I can not stay home daily with him.
"Cyber homeschooled"???? If you're relying on the computer to teach I wouldnt call it homeschooling.
Pablo

New Holland, PA

#5 Feb 28, 2011
annoyed wrote:
I cyber homeschooled my son last year for the fact he was gifted and moved way faster then the other children his age. He was 3 to 4 grades ahead of his peers in most subjects and up to 6 grade levels ahead in the others. In this age of technology its time for everyone, icluding the military to take a look at the education of the child and not just the status of being a "brick and mortar" school. Times have changed quickly and dramatically and we all need to adapt with it. I recently did place him back in the brick school, but only for financial reasons. I can not stay home daily with him.
Don't you think he missed out on other important things like social interaction? Recess, lunch, group projects, etc enable a child to learn about group thinking and team building.

It is good to hear your child is gifted. He may have a future working in a laboratory. But for military purposes, being gifted in certain subjects is not enough.
West Point Grad

Lancaster, PA

#6 Feb 28, 2011
Pablo wrote:
<quoted text>
Cyber schools are a total scam.
You may learn doing online courses, but you are not getting an education.
You miss out on social interaction with other students, one-on-one interactions with teachers, and the value of being a member of a team. Brick and motor schools offer more than just classrooms. Experiencing pep rallies, sporting events, student council, marching band, or science fairs are all part of the experience.
Why do you think public/private school kids turn out more well rounded than homeschoolers?
In the military, you must live and work as a team which requires more than just the ability to study math or English
In general, I find that homeschoolers are significantly more well-rounded than their peers.

The obvious question, of course, is “Why?” The answer, I think, is that homeschooling encourages students to be very well-rounded. One of the main reasons is simply this: The love of learning is not socialized out of homeschooled students. In most public and private schools, the social pressure pushes students away from learning. The most popular kids are not the ones who study hard and achieve academically. Instead, the good students are usually “rewarded” by their peers by being put on one of the lowest rungs of the social ladder. In homeschooling, it’s quite the opposite. Learning is encouraged not only by your daily contacts (parents and siblings), but also by the other homeschoolers you tend to work with. As a result, homeschooled students retain a love for learning, and that allows them to explore everything that interests them.

Another reason is that homeschooling is incredibly flexible. Because most homeschoolers are not tied to a syllabus, if a homeschooled student is studying history and finds the Hundred Years’ War interesting, he or she can take the time to learn about it in-depth. As the student does this, he or she will learn about all sorts of interesting things from the physics of war machines to the medicine of the day to the politics that drove the war. So what started out as a history assignment might develop into a physics lesson, a biology lesson, or a political science lesson. This kind of student-directed learning tends to emphasize the relatedness of the academic disciplines.

The data have always shown that homeschoolers are academically superior to their peers. My experiences indicate to me that they are also more well-rounded than their peers. Put those two things together, and you have the makings of some amazing future leaders!
YOUR choice

York, PA

#7 Feb 28, 2011
I cannot WAIT for some idiot to post the obvious, "fire all the damn greedy teachers and all children learn at home through the computer; huge savings on my taxed" ('Me First' Syndrome)! Pablo hit it square on the head! For the past several decades we have been 'dumbing down' America; now this. If you wish to chance/experiment with your childs future, fine! I've seen way too many of the so-called gifted students. So damn dumb they walk in front of traffic without looking. Their only friend is their cat 'Dufus'! I know, this is the brave new electronics world; you reap what you sow! These folks think their kid is the next drop out from tradition Bill Gates! Merry Christmas! Ipod/black, green, blueberry/facebook/short bus!
brick and MOTOR schools

Lebanon, PA

#8 Feb 28, 2011
And in the brick and 'MOTOR' schools you get to learn about bullying, and discrimination based on race, ethnicity, income, body type,etc... And you get to experience peer pressure, drugs, alcohol, cigartettes. And they students get the full experience of favoritism, some teachers that have long ago given up, and oh yes if you are just lucky enough you may get the experience of a shooter in you your school. The product of a student who was given all those experiences and just could not get through it, for whatever reason.
The point is everyones situation is different. Your school whether pubilc, private, home schooled or cyper school should fit the student. Not everyone is able to live in the 'rich' or 'good' school district. Not everyone is able to emotionally handle the pressure and humiliation the has greatly multiplied since 70s and 80s. Everyone needs the socialization and teamwork aspects, but I understand that cyberschools make that available also. I understand thay some people have the opinion that some students are more well reounded then others. But, by whose opinion does that statement make a fact? And is that what you would tell the families of the victims lost their lives. That the students are so much more well rounded, then if they had studied at home.
This is a personal choice made with the interests of each student in mind, Cyberschools are not necessarially a scam, not any more than a a Brick and Mortor school.
think about it

Lancaster, PA

#9 Feb 28, 2011
Pablo wrote:
<quoted text>
Don't you think he missed out on other important things like social interaction? Recess, lunch, group projects, etc enable a child to learn about group thinking and team building.
It is good to hear your child is gifted. He may have a future working in a laboratory. But for military purposes, being gifted in certain subjects is not enough.
Most homeschoolers gather with other homeschoolers frequently for socialization and interaction. A parent who decides to homeschool has taken on the responsibility of educating the "whole" child and the parents that I know seek out socialization for their children through their churches, volunteering, scouting, summer camps, sports, civil air patrol and similar activities. I cannot see how these choices provide inferior socialization and team building when compared with the experience of students "socialized" in our public schools.
Ya Right

Baltimore, MD

#10 Feb 28, 2011
I will turn 18 in September, I do the cyber school thing, I am only in the tenth grade though, so I will probly quit school, Cyber school is dumb, it makes it easy for me, because I can get away with everything, don't have to do the work, because nothing happens either way, no rules. I dont even have to go to classes on line, if I sign on to my computer it looks like Im attending then I can go do what I want, who cares I'm not paying for it.
YOUR choice

York, PA

#11 Feb 28, 2011
West Point Grad wrote:
<quoted text>
In general, I find that homeschoolers are significantly more well-rounded than their peers.
The obvious question, of course, is “Why?” The answer, I think, is that homeschooling encourages students to be very well-rounded. One of the main reasons is simply this: The love of learning is not socialized out of homeschooled students. In most public and private schools, the social pressure pushes students away from learning. The most popular kids are not the ones who study hard and achieve academically. Instead, the good students are usually “rewarded” by their peers by being put on one of the lowest rungs of the social ladder. In homeschooling, it’s quite the opposite. Learning is encouraged not only by your daily contacts (parents and siblings), but also by the other homeschoolers you tend to work with. As a result, homeschooled students retain a love for learning, and that allows them to explore everything that interests them.
Another reason is that homeschooling is incredibly flexible. Because most homeschoolers are not tied to a syllabus, if a homeschooled student is studying history and finds the Hundred Years’ War interesting, he or she can take the time to learn about it in-depth. As the student does this, he or she will learn about all sorts of interesting things from the physics of war machines to the medicine of the day to the politics that drove the war. So what started out as a history assignment might develop into a physics lesson, a biology lesson, or a political science lesson. This kind of student-directed learning tends to emphasize the relatedness of the academic disciplines.
The data have always shown that homeschoolers are academically superior to their peers. My experiences indicate to me that they are also more well-rounded than their peers. Put those two things together, and you have the makings of some amazing future leaders!
Not that impressed with any advice coming from a military academy graduate. My experience in the military with THEM was quite dismal. Look at me, I am academically superior/stand offish/aloof/way ahead of peers (sorta like homeschoolers), with no common sense whatsoever. Some of my best officers were the hard-knocks guys who graduated from a ROTC program at a typical university. They knew they had much to learn about their new way of life; instead of having all the answers, forthwith! I observe my grandchildren; they are required to complete their homework, on the computer, when returning from the typical school setting. They become involved in the assignment, and before you know it, they are ALSO off on some tangent, learning the history/science/physics of the subject at hand. Would much rather have students learn the heartache of defeat and/or the glory of victory, associating with other like minded individuals, say on an athletic team or in the school cafeteria. The military breaks down an individual to his lowest common denominator, then build them back up. Doesn't hurt to have a childs self esteem being challenged by his peers; although that certainly is a 'no, no' these days. After all, that IS the real world; being sheltered from these experiences helps no one.
think about it

Lancaster, PA

#12 Feb 28, 2011
Ya Right wrote:
I will turn 18 in September, I do the cyber school thing, I am only in the tenth grade though, so I will probly quit school, Cyber school is dumb, it makes it easy for me, because I can get away with everything, don't have to do the work, because nothing happens either way, no rules. I dont even have to go to classes on line, if I sign on to my computer it looks like Im attending then I can go do what I want, who cares I'm not paying for it.
This is most likely a fake post by a PSEA or NEA troll but I'll respond.

Cyber students are held accountable for their personal performance in ways that students that attend traditional public schools like the YCSD are not. Social Promotion allows students who cannot read or who read at a 3rd grade level to gain a diploma from the YCSD which should be more accurately called a "certificate of attendance".

In contrast cyber school attendance is no guarantee that a diploma will be granted without actually learning the material. A student who chooses not to learn in a traditional school wastes the efforts of the teacher and is usually disruptive adversely effecting the education of many students. In cyber school that same students decisions effect only themselves and their own future.
Pablo

New Holland, PA

#13 Feb 28, 2011
brick and MOTOR schools wrote:
And in the brick and 'MOTOR' schools you get to learn about bullying, and discrimination based on race, ethnicity, income, body type,etc... And you get to experience peer pressure, drugs, alcohol, cigartettes. And they students get the full experience of favoritism, some teachers that have long ago given up, and oh yes if you are just lucky enough you may get the experience of a shooter in you your school. The product of a student who was given all those experiences and just could not get through it, for whatever reason.
The point is everyones situation is different. Your school whether pubilc, private, home schooled or cyper school should fit the student. Not everyone is able to live in the 'rich' or 'good' school district. Not everyone is able to emotionally handle the pressure and humiliation the has greatly multiplied since 70s and 80s. Everyone needs the socialization and teamwork aspects, but I understand that cyberschools make that available also. I understand thay some people have the opinion that some students are more well reounded then others. But, by whose opinion does that statement make a fact? And is that what you would tell the families of the victims lost their lives. That the students are so much more well rounded, then if they had studied at home.
This is a personal choice made with the interests of each student in mind, Cyberschools are not necessarially a scam, not any more than a a Brick and Mortor school.
Sorry Brick and “Mortar,” I forgot to proof read. My apologies to the grammar Nazis.

Now back to the substance: Bullying, discrimination, peer pressure, favoritism exist even after you are done school. That is a fact of life. You can’t hide from, you must learn to deal with it.

I went to a middle class public school where the students came from all types of backgrounds. Rich, poor, black, white, you name it. I learned more from interacting with other people then I did from books. Sure you can read about India, but I had a classmate who was born and raised in India. In social studies class we heard firsthand what it was like growing up New Delhi.

In math class when I had trouble with a math problem, the teacher couldn’t always explain it to me. Fortunately I had friends who were able to explain it in a way that made it click in my head.
I was bullied, I was picked on. Who wasn’t? I was rejected by girls and also experienced my first love and kiss.

How do you get that from going to school at home or online?
the truth be told

York, PA

#14 Feb 28, 2011
I know 2 college students that do their classes and tests online. Both do not do their own work. Someone else as in a friend and family member do their school work. But who's looking. A teacher or instructor? hmmmm. Their presence at HACC is not required. One is studying to be a psychologists and the other a social worker. Gee , a client or patient never knows who is treating them. Also know of a single mom on the education for single mom's Obama program that logs online and gets her hair braided for hours while studying doing paper work and testing online to have a degree in special education for elementary education. And her friends who are visiting at her apartment take turns doing her school work. What do these cyber schools grade by ? The hours logged online.
brick and MOTOR schools

Lebanon, PA

#15 Feb 28, 2011
Pablo wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry Brick and “Mortar,” I forgot to proof read. My apologies to the grammar Nazis.
Now back to the substance: Bullying, discrimination, peer pressure, favoritism exist even after you are done school. That is a fact of life. You can’t hide from, you must learn to deal with it.
I went to a middle class public school where the students came from all types of backgrounds. Rich, poor, black, white, you name it. I learned more from interacting with other people then I did from books. Sure you can read about India, but I had a classmate who was born and raised in India. In social studies class we heard firsthand what it was like growing up New Delhi.
In math class when I had trouble with a math problem, the teacher couldn’t always explain it to me. Fortunately I had friends who were able to explain it in a way that made it click in my head.
I was bullied, I was picked on. Who wasn’t? I was rejected by girls and also experienced my first love and kiss.
How do you get that from going to school at home or online?
I screwed up the spelling to. another product of a Brick and Mortar school. Wish I had had the option of a cyber school.
And yes you must learn to deal with it. But different people deal with it in a different way. Some can not be forced to deal with it.
And I'll bet you that those victims families wish their children had been at home in front of a computer that day.
Useless

York, PA

#16 Feb 28, 2011
Have a relative who paid a co-worker to take her cyberschool on-line Trig final test for her!
professor

Camp Hill, PA

#17 Feb 28, 2011
I've seen the results of homeschooling in the college classroom.

I had a student this semester walk into class late. She had missed the first class. She sat in the front row, stared at me, and then interrupted the lecture to ask me for a syllabus.

When I told her that I would speak with her in my office hours, she attempted to have a conversation with me about her schedule and mine and how that probably wouldn't work. Remember, I had forty other kids in the class in the middle of a lecture while this is going on.

I looked at her, said, "you were homeschooled, weren't you?"

"Yes, cyberschooled."

"I thought so."

This is typical of what I find of homeschoolers. They think the world revolves around them and they don't get that I'm not their parent who will bend over backwards to accommodate.

Their grades are okay, but they have huge holes in their background curriculum that most students have and they often focused on a handful of subjects in depth instead of doing a survey of biology, chemistry, or history. So they're useless to us, because we have to start from scratch with them.(In other words, they're experts on the Battle of Gettysburg, but they can't you anything about African colonialism, or they know all about genetics, but nothing about the periodic table.)

Please, parents, leave teaching to the professionals. You may hate high school teachers, we college professors do too, but at least they don't send us students who don't know how to behave in a classroom setting and think my world should revolve around them.
Banks

Slatington, PA

#18 Feb 28, 2011
professor wrote:
Please, parents, leave teaching to the professionals. You may hate high school teachers, we college professors do too, but at least they don't send us students who don't know how to behave in a classroom setting and think my world should revolve around them.
That's a pretty crappy thing to say, "professor." I'm a professor at a university in PA and I certainly do not hate high school teachers. I don't hate middle school or elementary teachers either. What kind of educator would make such a stupid statement?
professor

Camp Hill, PA

#19 Mar 3, 2011
You're right. It was poorly worded, and it was a stupid comment, I admit, and apologize.

I meant we are often frustrated with the nature of the preparation our students received prior to arriving on our campuses.

I oversimplified and generalized the general consensus of most of my colleagues and I in an attempt to relate to the non-educators.
hmmm

Lancaster, PA

#20 Mar 3, 2011
the truth be told wrote:
I know 2 college students that do their classes and tests online. Both do not do their own work. Someone else as in a friend and family member do their school work. But who's looking. A teacher or instructor? hmmmm. Their presence at HACC is not required. One is studying to be a psychologists and the other a social worker. Gee , a client or patient never knows who is treating them. Also know of a single mom on the education for single mom's Obama program that logs online and gets her hair braided for hours while studying doing paper work and testing online to have a degree in special education for elementary education. And her friends who are visiting at her apartment take turns doing her school work. What do these cyber schools grade by ? The hours logged online.
They must attend one of theose "highly" accredited online schools, favored by teachers who need continuing ed credits, that do not require proctored exams.

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