Godless ministers are destroying America

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#61 Nov 3, 2012
Media Plan

Regent's five graduate divisions include a communications school designed to turn out journalists who will move into the secular media and produce broad­casting more to Robertson's liking. In a 1982 review of his "master plan," Ro­bertson said, "How nice it would be if all the presidents of the three major net­works happened to be trained with masters degrees from CBN University."
Robertson's media operation is both sophisticated and effective. Robertson's primary source of donations and public support is his 700 Club program, a show carried on the Family Channel and TV stations around the country. Broad­casting from state-of-the-art studios on a 700-acre property in Virginia Beach, the 700 Club reaches millions of viewers every weekday in the United States.

The program combines news reportage, Pentecostal theology and pragmatic advice about everything from child-rearing to financial in­vestments. Viewers can "claim" the "words of knowledge" that Robertson and his co-hosts receive di­rectly from God, and this divine source of miraculous healing has reportedly cured everything from sinus problems to cancer.

The public affairs reportage that begins each show, however, is much less exotic. 700 Club news segments on the surface appear to be standard network fare. Nicely dressed correspondents with care­fully coiffed hair brandish microphones as they stand in front of cameras at the White House, foreign capitals and elsewhere. The reports have a patina of objectivity, but what follows them most decidedly does not.

More often than not, Robertson's beaming persona appears as the seg­ments end to offer "biblical analysis" of the day's events. Flanked by sidekicks Ben Kinchlow and Terry Meeuwsen, Robertson proceeds to explain and interpret what the viewer just saw. Not surprisingly, the analysis reflects Robertson's ultra-conservative political stance and theocratic world view.
Thus, Robertson gets to have the best of both worlds: His reporters front as real newspeople, offering "balanced" re­ports on the day's events, while the "spin" is provided by the master of cere­monies himself.
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#62 Nov 4, 2012
Recently the arms of Robertson's broadcasting empire have been reaching overseas. In 1992, the Family Channel went global and now works with broadcast operations in the United Kingdom, South Korea, Canada, Australia and the Czech Republic. In addition, CBN claims 50 international ministry centers, includ­ing Middle East Television, a Lebanon-based operation that broadcasts to a po­tential audience of 11 million. Robertson has even targeted Communist countries like North Korea and Vietnam for broad­casting opportunities.

Predictably, Robertson has turned his wealth and grassroots following into political clout. His American Center for Law and Justice, based at Regent University Law School, boasts 20 full-time attorneys, including the increasingly pro­minent media personality Jay Sekulow, as well as a nationwide network of at least 220 volunteer lawyers. The group has an annual budget of $10 million.

Meanwhile, Robertson's Christian Coalition has become a huge player in the Republican party, controlling the GOP party machinery in an estimated 18 states, with significant influence in 13 others. Although Robertson's bid for the presidency in 1988 failed miserably, the grassroots network he built then has be­come one of the most successful forces in American political history, claiming 1.5 million members and a $20-million budget. Ralph Reed, the Christian Coa­lition's executive director, was named as one of Time magazine's stars of the future (12/5/94).
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#63 Nov 5, 2012
Recently the arms of Robertson's broadcasting empire have been reaching overseas. In 1992, the Family Channel went global and now works with broadcast operations in the United Kingdom, South Korea, Canada, Australia and the Czech Republic. In addition, CBN claims 50 international ministry centers, includ­ing Middle East Television, a Lebanon-based operation that broadcasts to a po­tential audience of 11 million. Robertson has even targeted Communist countries like North Korea and Vietnam for broad­casting opportunities.

Predictably, Robertson has turned his wealth and grassroots following into political clout. His American Center for Law and Justice, based at Regent University Law School, boasts 20 full-time attorneys, including the increasingly pro­minent media personality Jay Sekulow, as well as a nationwide network of at least 220 volunteer lawyers. The group has an annual budget of $10 million.

Meanwhile, Robertson's Christian Coalition has become a huge player in the Republican party, controlling the GOP party machinery in an estimated 18 states, with significant influence in 13 others.

Although Robertson's bid for the presidency in 1988 failed miserably, the grassroots network he built then has be­come one of the most successful forces in American political history, claiming 1.5 million members and a $20-million budget. Ralph Reed, the Christian Coa­lition's executive director, was named as one of Time magazine's stars of the future (12/5/94).
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#64 Nov 5, 2012
Marxists, Masons and Rothschilds

Robertson's climb to wealth and political power could be dismissed as yet another television preacher done well on the do­nations of the faithful, but few Ameri­cans know the extent of his extremist worldview. Robertson not only wants to move the United States as close as possible toward a fundamentalist theocracy, but he also spreads deeply paranoid po­litical theories and conspiracy theories with anti-Semitic overtones.

Although the Christian Coalition's Reed has tried hard to moderate Robertson's public image, the religious broadcaster's bizarre opinions continue to erupt. While Robertson is usually careful to avoid extremist rhetoric when addressing the general public on television, he is less guarded in literature aimed at his diehard followers.

Perhaps his best examples come from his 1992 book The New World Order, a book that the Christian Coalition used to send to high donors. In it, Robertson links George Bush, Jimmy Carter, John Lennon and Vladimir Lenin, the Illuminati, Shirley MacLaine and the New Age Movement, Masons and Marxists, Rockefellers and Rothschilds, the United Nations, the Trilateral Commission and the Council on Foreign Relations—all "part of a Satan-spawned cabal to bring about a socialist, one-world government and, ultimately, the reign of the Anti-Christ."

Robertson lobs heavy criticism at the activities of "European bankers," a term which seems to be used as a synonym for the Jewish financiers who lurk behind the scenes in so many right-wing fan­tasies.(They even arranged the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, he asserts.) "It is reported," Robertson writes, that in Frankfurt, Jews for the first time were admitted to the order of freemasons. If in­deed members of the Rothschild family or their close associates were polluted by the occultism of Weishaupt's Illuminated Freemasonry, we may have discovered the link between the occult and the world of high finance.
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#65 Nov 8, 2012
(Note: Robertson’s intelligence, he misses the simple truth. His anti-Semitic beliefs are anti-Christian because we know that Jews are God’s chosen race.
Roberson has lumped all Jews together, while I can’t stress too strongly, the importance of knowing that the Rothschilds SAY they are Jews, but they are not -- not genetically because they’re Caucasians, and not by faith because they worship money and power.
Just as I keep pointing out that countless people SAY they are Christians, but they are not.
Look at their deeds. Christians who do evil are one of Satan’s best weapons against Christianity, and the Rothschilds’ worship of money, war-making for many generations, etc. is one of Satan’s best weapons against the Jews.
I suspect it will be the Rothschilds who eventually turn the world against all Jews, fulfilling Bible prophecy.)

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#66 Nov 9, 2012
And, shades of Willie Horton, Robertson raises the specter of black United Nations troops marauding through America. He twice cites a 1960 picture taken during civil conflict in the Congo: "I cannot forget," Robertson declares, the bloody picture in Life magazine of the young Belgian settler in Katanga whose wife and children lay dead behind him in a little Volkswagen, brutally killed by black African soldiers serving in a United Nations contingent. If it happened there, it can happen here.
Robertson has won a large measure of political respectability, speaking at the 1992 Republican convention and drawing to his Christian Coalition conference stage virtually every major GOP presidential hopeful.
What does Robertson want? According to his book, he seeks ultimately a "godly government," one where "God's house and God's people" (he and his flock) are given "their rightful place at the top of the world." (In a 1993 speech in South Carolina, Robertson denounced church-state separation as a "lie of the left.")
What does Robertson mean by "godly government"? Perhaps something like Guatemala under former dictator Efrain Rios Montt, a friend of Robertson and a fellow Pentecostal. Although human rights groups charged Rios Montt with massive human rights abuses, Robertson praises the brutal regime in The New World Order for its "enlightened leadership."

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#68 Nov 12, 2012
Joseph L. Conn is managing editor of Church & State, the monthly magazine of Americans United for Separation of Church and State. Rob Boston is assistant editor of that publication, and author of Why the Religious Right Is Wrong About Separation of Church and State.
http://www.fair.org/index.php...

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#69 Nov 13, 2012
Christianity Today
Pat Robertson Repudiates the Gospel

…on his television show Christian broadcaster Pat Robertson said a man would be morally justified to divorce his wife with Alzheimer's disease in order to marry another woman. The dementia-riddled wife is, Robertson said, "not there" anymore. This is more than an embarrassment. This is more than cruelty. This is a repudiation of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Few Christians take Robertson all that seriously anymore. Most roll their eyes, and shake their heads when he makes another outlandish comment (for instance, defending China's brutal one-child abortion policy to identifying God's judgment on specific actions in the September 11 attacks, Hurricane Katrina, or the Haiti earthquake). This is serious, though, because it points to an issue that is much bigger than Robertson.
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#70 Nov 14, 2012
Marriage, the Scripture tells us, is an icon of something deeper, more ancient, more mysterious. The marriage union is a sign, the Apostle Paul announces, of the mystery of Christ and his church (Eph. 5).
The husband, then, is to love his wife "as Christ loved the church" (Eph. 5:25). This love is defined not as the hormonal surge of romance but as a self-sacrificial crucifixion of self. The husband pictures Christ when he loves his wife by giving himself up for her.

At the arrest of Christ, his Bride, the church, forgot who she was, and denied who he was. He didn't divorce her. He didn't leave.
The Bride of Christ fled his side, and went back to their old ways of life. When Jesus came to them after the resurrection, the church was about the very thing they were doing when Jesus found them in the first place: out on the boats with their nets. Jesus didn't leave. He stood by his words, stood by his Bride, even to the Place of the Skull, and beyond.

A woman or a man with Alzheimer's can't do anything for you. There's no romance, no sex, no partnership, not even companionship. That's just the point. Because marriage is a Christ/church icon, a man loves his wife as his own flesh. He cannot sever her off from him simply because she isn't "useful" anymore.
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#71 Nov 15, 2012
Pat Robertson's cruel marriage statement is no anomaly. He and his cohorts have given us for years a prosperity gospel with more in common with an Asherah pole than a cross. They have given us a politicized Christianity that uses churches to "mobilize" voters rather than to stand prophetically outside the power structures as a witness for the gospel.

But Jesus didn't die for a Christian Coalition; he died for a church. And the church, across the ages, isn't significant because of her size or influence. She is weak, helpless, and spattered in blood. He is faithful to us anyway.

If our churches are to survive, we must repudiate this Canaanite mammonocracy that so often speaks for us. But, beyond that, we must train up a new generation to see the gospel embedded in fidelity, a fidelity that is cruciform.

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#72 Nov 16, 2012
It's easy to teach couples to put the "spark" back in their marriages, to put the "sizzle" back in their sex lives. You can still worship the self and want all that. But that's not what love is. Love is fidelity with a cross on your back. Love is drowning in your own blood. Love is screaming, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me."

Sadly, many of our neighbors assume that when they hear the parade of cartoon characters we allow to speak for us, that they are hearing the gospel. They assume that when they see the giggling evangelist on the television screen, that they see Jesus.

They assume that when they see the stadium political rallies to "take back America for Christ," that they see Jesus. But Jesus isn't there.
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#73 Nov 16, 2012

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#74 Nov 18, 2012
Pat Robertson Controversies

On January 14, 1991, on The 700 Club, Pat Robertson attacked a number of Protestant denominations when he declared: "You say you're supposed to be nice to the Episcopalians and the Presbyterians and the Methodists and this, that, and the other thing. Nonsense. I don't have to be nice to the spirit of the Antichrist."

On the August 22, 2005 broadcast of The 700 Club, Robertson said of Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez:
I don't know about this doctrine of assassination, but if he thinks we're trying to assassinate him, I think that we really ought to go ahead and do it. It's a whole lot cheaper than starting a war, and I don’t think any oil shipments will stop.

On February 2, 2006 edition of Hannity and Colmes, Pat Robertson once again called for Chávez's assassination. When Colmes asked Robertson "Do you want him taken out?", Robertson replied "Not now, but one day, one day, one day."

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#75 Nov 20, 2012
In a 2001 interview with CNN's Wolf Blitzer, he said that the Chinese were "doing what they have to do," regarding China's one-child policy, sometimes enforced with compulsory abortions, though he said that he did not personally agree with the practice. His comments drew criticism from both sides of the political spectrum.

…in Randi's book The Faith Healers…Randi commented that "in 1986, soon after the full importance of the AIDS epidemic began to become evident, Robertson was attempting to cure it" by proclaiming people cured after prayer.

Randi commented, "Gerry Straub, a former associate of Pat Robertson and his television producer, pointed out in his book Salvation for Sale the astonishing fact that God seemed to time miracles to conform with standard television format," and "God would stop speaking to Pat and stop healing exactly in time with the theme music."

Randi explained that "in 1979, it appeared to Robertson's staff that their boss had been taking lessons from Oral Roberts" and "proposed to film the Second Coming!".
The project was eventually publicly dropped, but "budget allocations [CBN] are made for their development."[14] Martin Gardner also criticized Robertson's faith healing in Gardner's work Beyond Reason.
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#76 Nov 21, 2012
Many of Robertson's views mirror those of fellow evangelical pastor/activist Jerry Falwell, who made frequent appearances on The 700 Club. He agreed with Falwell when Falwell stated that the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks were caused by "pagans, abortionists, feminists, gays, lesbians, the American Civil Liberties Union and the People For the American Way."

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#77 Nov 22, 2012
On the June 8, 1998 edition of his show, Robertson denounced Orlando, Florida and Disney World for allowing a privately sponsored "Gay Days" weekend. Robertson stated that the acceptance of homosexuality could result in hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, terrorist bombings and "possibly a meteor."
The resulting outcry prompted Robertson to return to the topic on June 24, where he quoted the Book of Revelation to support his claims. The first hurricane of the 1998 Atlantic hurricane season, Hurricane Bonnie, actually turned away from Florida and instead damaged the rest of the east coast.
The area hardest hit by the hurricane was the Hampton Roads region, which includes Virginia Beach, where the Robertson's The 700 Club originates. While other hurricanes did hit Florida, none of them hit Disney World.

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#78 Nov 22, 2012
Racehorses
In April 2002, Robertson acknowledged owning a race horse, named "Mr. Pat." He told a New York Times reporter that his interest in the horse was based purely on its aesthetics. "I don't bet and I don't gamble. I just enjoy watching horses running and performing." He found it harder to explain why he spent $520,000 on the horse and intended it to compete at the track. Robertson sold the horse a month after the Times article was released.

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#79 Nov 23, 2012
Power of his prayers

Robertson prayed to God to steer hurricanes away from his company's Virginia Beach, Virginia headquarters. He credited his prayers for steering the course of Hurricane Gloria in 1985, which caused billions of dollars of destruction in many states along the U.S. east coast. He made a similar claim about another destructive storm, Hurricane Felix, in 1995.

In 2005, Robertson launched "Operation Supreme Court Freedom", a televised nationwide 21-day prayer campaign asking people to pray for vacancies on the Supreme Court, where "black-robed tyrants have pushed a radical agenda." Robertson declared that "God heard those prayers", after the announced resignation of Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
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#80 Nov 23, 2012
Personal Note:
(He was daily calling for everybody to pray to heal the nation, then Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast. If God really uses natural disasters to punish us, as he said in the past, then it looks like he’s being punished for his anti-Christian words.
He was daily ranting against liberals and Obama as if they were the devil’s workers, and the reward for his prayers was that Romney lost.
Amazingly, after the election, the statement was made on his show, that GOD ISN’T A REPUBLICAN OR DEMOCRAT! That’s completely opposite of what he was saying for years before that.
Evidently a huge number of people wised up, and it’s costing him financially. I didn‘t hear anything about him changing his stripes.)

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#81 Nov 30, 2012
An investigation by the Commonwealth of Virginia's Office of Consumer Affairs determined that Robertson "willfully induced contributions from the public through the use of misleading statements and other implications" and called for a criminal prosecution against Robertson in 1999.
However, Virginia Attorney General Mark Earley, a Republican whose largest campaign contributor two years earlier was Robertson himself, intervened, accepting that Robertson had made deceptive appeals but overruling the recommendation for his prosecution. No charges were ever brought against Robertson. "Two years earlier, while Virginia's investigation was gathering steam, Robertson donated $35,000 to Earley's campaign — Earley's largest contribution."
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