Immigrants: We're Still Here, Still W...

Immigrants: We're Still Here, Still Want Reform

There are 41 comments on the CBS Local story from Oct 5, 2013, titled Immigrants: We're Still Here, Still Want Reform. In it, CBS Local reports that:

Miami's newest immigrants will march through one of the city's oldest Cuban enclaves Saturday as part of a nationwide effort to spotlight the need for immigration reform.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at CBS Local.

jbrgn

United States

#25 Oct 7, 2013
see the light wrote:
<quoted text>BS! Immigrants cant contribute anything! We only get weaker trying to take care of them. We know you illegals don't want to pay taxes. What are you good for?Useless Welfare bums.
actually my friend many mexicans do work hard n can contribute to many things .i believe the term contribute means(to give as part of a group effort or donation or offering)n if im not mistaken many of them did work hard together to pick that cotton to make some of that clothes you wear or some of those fruits you eat.

“A Nation of Legal Immigrants”

Since: Nov 07

Lake City Florida,/ Nebraska

#26 Oct 8, 2013
jbrgn wrote:
I hope this reform passes soon. Hard working immigrants that will be legalized will help make nation stronger and better.

THIS GOVERNMENT SHOULD LEAVE US HARD WORKING ILLEGAL MEXICANS HERE.

SOME OF US ARE NOT HERE TO CAUSE TROUBLE WERE HERE TO WORK AND TO GIVE OUR KIDS BORN IN THIS COUNTRY THE LIFE THEY DESERVE .

THE LIFE I DIDNT GET I WANT THEM TO HAVE.
So when are you going to tell your children you're an illegal alien Mexican and broke our immigration laws to get here?
Vet

Fayetteville, GA

#27 Oct 8, 2013
jbrgn wrote:
<quoted text>actually my friend many mexicans do work hard n can contribute to many things .i believe the term contribute means(to give as part of a group effort or donation or offering)n if im not mistaken many of them did work hard together to pick that cotton to make some of that clothes you wear or some of those fruits you eat.
If they are illegals, they picked that cotton illegally. Arrest and deport.

“A Nation of Legal Immigrants”

Since: Nov 07

Lake City Florida,/ Nebraska

#28 Oct 8, 2013
jbrgn wrote:
<quoted text>

actually my friend many mexicans do work hard n can contribute to many things .

i believe the term contribute means(to give as part of a group effort or donation or offering)n if im not mistaken many of them did work hard together to pick that cotton to make some of that clothes you wear or some of those fruits you eat.
LOL!!!

That's not all they do!

Illegal Aliens Receive Billions in IRS Tax Benefits

Friday, 23 Sep 2011 05:17 PM

By James Walsh

On July 7, 2011, the U.S. Department of Treasury's inspector general for tax administration issued a startling report entitled "Individuals Who Are Not Authorized to Work in the United States Were Paid $4.2 Billion in Refundable Credits."

No wonder the nation's finances are in turmoil.

******It is clear that unauthorized aliens are filing ITIN tax returns withfraudulent data.******

The Treasury report found that "One common type of
fraudulent refund involves taxpayers fabricating a Wage and Tax Statement (Form W-2) that shows excess withholding and results in a tax refund."

Read more on Newsmax.com : Illegal Aliens Receive Billions in IRS Tax
Benefits

“A Nation of Legal Immigrants”

Since: Nov 07

Lake City Florida,/ Nebraska

#29 Oct 8, 2013
Loophole!

Yesterday, Members of the House Ways & Means Committee voted 22-12 to stop
the IRS from giving refundable tax credits to illegal aliens.

Last year, the Inspector General for the U.S. Treasury Department released a
report revealing that illegal aliens annually receive $4.2 billion in
refundable tax credits, primarily through the Additional Child Tax Credit
(ACTC).

The Ways and Means Committee voted to close this tax credit loophole by
requiring that individuals who claim the ACTC provide a valid Social
Security Number (SSN), based on language introduced by Rep. Sam Johnson
(R-TX). Currently, the IRS only requires applicants for the ACTC to provide
an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN), which the Internal
Revenue Service (IRS) indiscriminately hands out to illegal aliens.

The legislation was part of a budget reconciliation proposal that now goes
to the House Budget Committee for inclusion in a larger package aimed at
saving tax-payer dollars.

FAIR thanks the following Ways and Means Committee Members who voted to
close the loophole:

Chairman David Camp (R-MI) Rep. Jim Gerlach (R-PA)
Rep. Wally Herger (R-CA) Rep. Tom Price (R-GA)
Rep. Sam Johnson (R-TX) Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-FL)
Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX) Rep. Adrian Smith (R-NE)
Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) Rep. Aaron Schock (R-IL)
Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) Rep. Lynn Jenkins (R-KS)
Rep. Pat Tiberi (R-OH) Rep. Erik Paulsen (R-MN)
Rep. Geoff Davis (R-KY) Rep. Kenny Marchant (R-TX)
Rep. Dave Reichert (R-WA) Rep. Rick Berg (R-ND)
Rep. Charles Boustany (R-LA) Rep. Diane Black (R-TN)
Rep. Peter Roskam (R-IL) Rep. Tom Reed (R-NY)

******Members who voted against closing the loophole include:******



Rep. Ranking Member Sander Levin (D-MI) Rep. Mike Thompson,(D-CA)
Rep. Fortney Pete Stark,(D-CA) Rep. John B. Larson,(D-CT)
Rep. Jim McDermott,(D-WA) Rep. Ron Kind,(D-WI)
Rep. John Lewis,(D-GA) Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr.,(D-NJ)
Rep. Richard E. Neal,(D-MA) Rep. Shelley Berkley,(D-NV)
Rep. Lloyd Doggett,(D-TX) Rep. Joseph Crowley,(D-NY)
Mayela

Atlanta, GA

#30 Oct 8, 2013
Children of Mexican Vineyard Laborers Now Vintners

It's the classic American success story, with a twist: A new generation of wine producers in Napa and Sonoma counties in Northern California are the children of Mexican immigrants who once labored in the same vineyards.

CHADWICK:...cleanse your pallet for a story about California wine. California's full-bodied wine reputation rests, in part, on the backs of Mexican migrant farm workers. They tended the vines for decades. Now many of their children who grew up in the vineyards are finding their own place in the industry as wine makers. As Andrea Kissack reports, these Mexican-American wine producers are also able to tap an emerging market: Latino wine drinkers.

Ms. AMELIA CEJA (President, Ceja Vineyards): The first time I picked grapes, it was Merlot--very succulent--and that is where I met Pedro and Armando, and we knew that we were going to have a vineyard someday.

KISSACK: Amelia Ceja is president of Ceja Vineyards, a small, family run winery located in the heart of the Carneros wine district at the edge of southern Sonoma and Napa counties. The story of how this Mexican-American family went from picking grapes to making award-winning wines is the stuff novels are made of. Amelia Ceja left her village in the state of Jalisco when she was 12 to join her parents in Napa. In those hot, dusty vineyards, she met her husband-to-be, Pedro Ceja. His father had arrived in Napa through the bracero migrant worker program. As Amelia Ceja recalls, they spent long hours picking grapes.

Ms. CEJA: Oh, no, it was backbreaking work. Think about picking a ton of grapes, bins that weigh typically 40 pounds, and you do it all day. It's pretty hard work.

KISSACK: But the work paid off, and the family sent their children to college. Now a generation later, the Cejas own more than 100 acres of vineyards. Even with their success, they retain a deep appreciation for the work that goes on in the fields. It's the Mexican farm workers who train and prune the young vines and pick the grapes in the fall.

Ms. CEJA: It is highly skilled labor. The true artisans in our industry are the farm workers. Without the farm workers, there will not be a fabulous wine industry in California.

Ms. VIOLETA BARROSO (Founder, Mar y Sol Vineyard; Hispanic Chamber of Commerce): I grew up as a migrant farm worker child, and we grew up in immigrant tenements and, you know, I worked really hard. That was part of the ethic that my parents instilled in us. And I went to Stanford and studied biology there.

KISSACK: Violeta Barroso is a Hispanic Chamber member and founder of Mar y Sol Vineyards in the Central Valley town of King City. Her winery is one of 18 now owned by Mexican-Americans in California. Among the first in her family to receive a college education, Barroso took what she learned back into the wine industry. She specializes in high-quality, low-cost wines that pair well with Latin foods.

Ms. BARROSO: Being in the wine industry, I would bring bottles of wine home and my parents were, you know, very complimentary, but not that enthusiastic. So that gave us the idea that there was a need for a tailored style of wine for the types of food that we ate.

KISSACK: Recent surveys show Latinos' taste for wine is growing, but the industry has struggled with how to market to Latinos. Now these small Mexican-American-owned wineries, like the Cejas, are stepping into that marketing challenge and are learning how to cater to this growing demographic.

KISSACK: Wines are poured with passionate descriptions of what went into making them. And next to the tasting room is a long farm table where she hosts home-cooked Mexican meals to show of her Ceja wines.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php...

Que sera, sera/Whatever will be will be/The future's not ours to see/Que sera, sera
http://www.metrolyrics.com/que-sera-sera-what...
Vet

Fayetteville, GA

#31 Oct 8, 2013
Mayela wrote:
Children of Mexican Vineyard Laborers Now Vintners
It's the classic American success story, with a twist: A new generation of wine producers in Napa and Sonoma counties in Northern California are the children of Mexican immigrants who once labored in the same vineyards.
CHADWICK:...cleanse your pallet for a story about California wine. California's full-bodied wine reputation rests, in part, on the backs of Mexican migrant farm workers. They tended the vines for decades. Now many of their children who grew up in the vineyards are finding their own place in the industry as wine makers. As Andrea Kissack reports, these Mexican-American wine producers are also able to tap an emerging market: Latino wine drinkers.
Ms. AMELIA CEJA (President, Ceja Vineyards): The first time I picked grapes, it was Merlot--very succulent--and that is where I met Pedro and Armando, and we knew that we were going to have a vineyard someday.
KISSACK: Amelia Ceja is president of Ceja Vineyards, a small, family run winery located in the heart of the Carneros wine district at the edge of southern Sonoma and Napa counties. The story of how this Mexican-American family went from picking grapes to making award-winning wines is the stuff novels are made of. Amelia Ceja left her village in the state of Jalisco when she was 12 to join her parents in Napa. In those hot, dusty vineyards, she met her husband-to-be, Pedro Ceja. His father had arrived in Napa through the bracero migrant worker program. As Amelia Ceja recalls, they spent long hours picking grapes.
Ms. CEJA: Oh, no, it was backbreaking work. Think about picking a ton of grapes, bins that weigh typically 40 pounds, and you do it all day. It's pretty hard work.
KISSACK: But the work paid off, and the family sent their children to college. Now a generation later, the Cejas own more than 100 acres of vineyards. Even with their success, they retain a deep appreciation for the work that goes on in the fields. It's the Mexican farm workers who train and prune the young vines and pick the grapes in the fall.
Ms. CEJA: It is highly skilled labor. The true artisans in our industry are the farm workers. Without the farm workers, there will not be a fabulous wine industry in California.
Ms. VIOLETA BARROSO (Founder, Mar y Sol Vineyard; Hispanic Chamber of Commerce): I grew up as a migrant farm worker child, and we grew up in immigrant tenements and, you know, I worked really hard. That was part of the ethic that my parents instilled in us. And I went to Stanford and studied biology there.
KISSACK: Violeta Barroso is a Hispanic Chamber member and founder of Mar y Sol Vineyards in the Central Valley town of King City. Her winery is one of 18 now owned by Mexican-Americans in California. Among the first in her family to receive a college education, Barroso took what she learned back into the wine industry. She specializes in high-quality, low-cost wines that pair well with Latin foods.
Ms. BARROSO: Being in the wine industry, I would bring bottles of wine home and my parents were, you know, very complimentary, but not that enthusiastic. So that gave us the idea that there was a need for a tailored style of wine for the types of food that we ate.
KISSACK: Recent surveys show Latinos' taste for wine is growing, but the industry has struggled with how to market to Latinos. Now these small Mexican-American-owned wineries, like the Cejas, are stepping into that marketing challenge and are learning how to cater to this growing demographic.
KISSACK: Wines are poured with passionate descriptions of what went into making them. And next to the tasting room is a long farm table where she hosts home-cooked Mexican meals to show of her Ceja wines.

http://www.metrolyrics.com/que-sera-sera-what...
Who cares, the illegals are still criminals.
Vet

Fayetteville, GA

#32 Oct 8, 2013
Mayela wrote:
Children of Mexican Vineyard Laborers Now Vintners
It's the classic American success story, with a twist: A new generation of wine producers in Napa and Sonoma counties in Northern California are the children of Mexican immigrants who once labored in the same vineyards.
CHADWICK:...cleanse your pallet for a story about California wine. California's full-bodied wine reputation rests, in part, on the backs of Mexican migrant farm workers. They tended the vines for decades. Now many of their children who grew up in the vineyards are finding their own place in the industry as wine makers. As Andrea Kissack reports, these Mexican-American wine producers are also able to tap an emerging market: Latino wine drinkers.
Ms. AMELIA CEJA (President, Ceja Vineyards): The first time I picked grapes, it was Merlot--very succulent--and that is where I met Pedro and Armando, and we knew that we were going to have a vineyard someday.
KISSACK: Amelia Ceja is president of Ceja Vineyards, a small, family run winery located in the heart of the Carneros wine district at the edge of southern Sonoma and Napa counties. The story of how this Mexican-American family went from picking grapes to making award-winning wines is the stuff novels are made of. Amelia Ceja left her village in the state of Jalisco when she was 12 to join her parents in Napa. In those hot, dusty vineyards, she met her husband-to-be, Pedro Ceja. His father had arrived in Napa through the bracero migrant worker program. As Amelia Ceja recalls, they spent long hours picking grapes.
Ms. CEJA: Oh, no, it was backbreaking work. Think about picking a ton of grapes, bins that weigh typically 40 pounds, and you do it all day. It's pretty hard work.
KISSACK: But the work paid off, and the family sent their children to college. Now a generation later, the Cejas own more than 100 acres of vineyards. Even with their success, they retain a deep appreciation for the work that goes on in the fields. It's the Mexican farm workers who train and prune the young vines and pick the grapes in the fall.
Ms. CEJA: It is highly skilled labor. The true artisans in our industry are the farm workers. Without the farm workers, there will not be a fabulous wine industry in California.
Ms. VIOLETA BARROSO (Founder, Mar y Sol Vineyard; Hispanic Chamber of Commerce): I grew up as a migrant farm worker child, and we grew up in immigrant tenements and, you know, I worked really hard. That was part of the ethic that my parents instilled in us. And I went to Stanford and studied biology there.
KISSACK: Violeta Barroso is a Hispanic Chamber member and founder of Mar y Sol Vineyards in the Central Valley town of King City. Her winery is one of 18 now owned by Mexican-Americans in California. Among the first in her family to receive a college education, Barroso took what she learned back into the wine industry. She specializes in high-quality, low-cost wines that pair well with Latin foods.
Ms. BARROSO: Being in the wine industry, I would bring bottles of wine home and my parents were, you know, very complimentary, but not that enthusiastic. So that gave us the idea that there was a need for a tailored style of wine for the types of food that we ate.
KISSACK: Recent surveys show Latinos' taste for wine is growing, but the industry has struggled with how to market to Latinos. Now these small Mexican-American-owned wineries, like the Cejas, are stepping into that marketing challenge and are learning how to cater to this growing demographic.
KISSACK: Wines are poured with passionate descriptions of what went into making them. And next to the tasting room is a long farm table where she hosts home-cooked Mexican meals to show of her Ceja wines.
Who cares, illegals are still criminals.
Dequin

Landsberg, Germany

#33 Oct 8, 2013
All those comments that are cynical are shameful to me, because all that these immigrants are doing, is the same thing that all Americans who originally were immigrants ,did. So-to criminalize this, is all the making of a government which is incompetent enough to not even have enough strawberry harversters allocated-and which is shut down for the time being.
All that immigrants are doing is to search for a
better life.
One can clearly see from the fact that up until now there haven´t been any major incidents during
demonstrations,what a meek and humble bunch these
immigrants are: They know that they can only ask
for assistance and not demand it at all cost.
The Tea-Party faction no doubt has been targeting
also the immigration reform with the budget debate.
American voters will ,sooner rather than later get a hang of who is blocking
what, and why.
The point is: You cannot mass-deport these people.
Within the United states as well as in the E.U.,
there needs to be a new attitude towards this issue.
Because: let´s face it, this world is an overpopulated place. So- who can be blamed for
wanting a better life? "Nobody ,actually!" is the answer. So the border-fence is kind of a piece
of nonsense, first of all, because migrant workers are needed anyways, and secondly, because whosoever wants to come will come in anyways.
If you try to reinforce this by using tazers, and someone were to die, law-enforcement would already
be guilty of manslaughter.
So it is just a question of common sense to not get
too hyped up with reinforcing anti-immigration
measures, because in a deeper sense, even the government does not hace a moral right to do
that.If the fence should become a place where there often are incidents happening, where people come
to harm, in a matter of a few years, there´d be
a border-war raging. The United states doesen´t want immigrants, just as the Chinese didn´t want
the Mongols. as a result, the Mongols conquered them and ruled them for a few hundred years.
Eventually, the Han-Chinese were able to assimilate
the skills of the Mongols and the Mongols themselves.Eventually they got attacked by the Japanese from another direction altogether.
So I´d say, a neighbor is a neighbor: You should
always be able to have a chat with them and try
to understand their perspective, as well as
to kind of not be too strict on territorial issues.
An absolute enemy is something else altogether:
You don´t want to treat both in similiar ways!
jbrgn

United States

#34 Oct 8, 2013
Cricket 23 wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL!!!
That's not all they do!
Illegal Aliens Receive Billions in IRS Tax Benefits
Friday, 23 Sep 2011 05:17 PM
By James Walsh
On July 7, 2011, the U.S. Department of Treasury's inspector general for tax administration issued a startling report entitled "Individuals Who Are Not Authorized to Work in the United States Were Paid $4.2 Billion in Refundable Credits."
No wonder the nation's finances are in turmoil.
******It is clear that unauthorized aliens are filing ITIN tax returns withfraudulent data.******
The Treasury report found that "One common type of
fraudulent refund involves taxpayers fabricating a Wage and Tax Statement (Form W-2) that shows excess withholding and results in a tax refund."
Read more on Newsmax.com : Illegal Aliens Receive Billions in IRS Tax
Benefits
dude maybe half of that money was really paid to immigrants but only cause they did diserve to recieve some tax money back n the other half maybe just maybe they gave it to those lazy citizenss (who dont like to work n love that unemployment check)who add kids on their tax refund to get more money out of it.n i say, how the heck is he getting an income if he dont work..To find out only because the sisters husband is illegal n THE HUSBAND IS using the BRO IN LAWS SOCIAL ILLEGALLY AND LETS HIS LAZY CITIZEN B.I.L CLAIM HIS TAX REFUND ALL FOR HIM..ITS EVEERYWHERE PAL we just see want we want see whats convenient for us . Thats how it is sir....
jbrgn

United States

#35 Oct 8, 2013
Cricket 23 wrote:
<quoted text>
So when are you going to tell your children you're an illegal alien Mexican and broke our immigration laws to get here?
Actually cricket 0 my oldest baby thats nine just cant figure it all out but knows her daddy is an illegal Mexican but im good n the best thing is that you all people fight for YOUR money N COUNTRY well me n my wife PAY our taxes n cant assure you that were a family of four n me n my wife both work make just about enough money to live comfortable n we dont recieve YOUR WELFARE HELP THAT MANY citizens complain about.
jbrgn

United States

#36 Oct 8, 2013
Vet wrote:
<quoted text>If they are illegals, they picked that cotton illegally. Arrest and deport.
So is that cotton illegal cause it waas picked n fertilized by n illegal alien.throw all those fruits n vegestables away cause they were harvested by many immigrants .
pito

Marietta, GA

#37 Oct 8, 2013
The Spanish were here before the Europeans. They do have seniority!
see the light

El Paso, TX

#38 Oct 8, 2013
jbrgn wrote:
<quoted text>actually my friend many mexicans do work hard n can contribute to many things .i believe the term contribute means(to give as part of a group effort or donation or offering)n if im not mistaken many of them did work hard together to pick that cotton to make some of that clothes you wear or some of those fruits you eat.
Just because they pick cotten, doesn't give them a U.S Citizens right. Don't know why you beaners seem to think your'e entitled. Please tell me why a person who broke the law coming here, deserves benefits that belong to American's? Tell Mexico to take care of you.
see the light

El Paso, TX

#39 Oct 8, 2013
pito wrote:
The Spanish were here before the Europeans. They do have seniority!
Your'e not even true Spanish. Your'e mixed with indian-thats why your so dark.Your language is slang, not even spanish.
jbrgn

United States

#40 Oct 8, 2013
see the light wrote:
<quoted text>Just because they pick cotten, doesn't give them a U.S Citizens right. Don't know why you beaners seem to think your'e entitled. Please tell me why a person who broke the law coming here, deserves benefits that belong to American's? Tell Mexico to take care of you.
........we are.
see the light

El Paso, TX

#41 Oct 9, 2013
jbrgn wrote:
<quoted text> ........we are.
You don't belong here, go home......
Yocal Pillbilly

Beckley, WV

#42 Oct 9, 2013
Illegal immigrants.....you have no rights or say in any reform. If you are given any, that is illegal and wrong. You have an avenue, go through the process or go back home.

“A Nation of Legal Immigrants”

Since: Nov 07

Lake City Florida,/ Nebraska

#43 Oct 9, 2013
jbrgn wrote:
<quoted text>dude maybe half of that money was really paid to immigrants but only cause they did diserve to recieve some tax money back n the other half maybe just maybe they gave it to those lazy citizenss (who dont like to work n love that unemployment check)who add kids on their tax refund to get more money out of it.n i say, how the heck is he getting an income if he dont work..To find out only because the sisters husband is illegal n THE HUSBAND IS using the BRO IN LAWS SOCIAL ILLEGALLY AND LETS HIS LAZY CITIZEN B.I.L CLAIM HIS TAX REFUND ALL FOR HIM..ITS EVEERYWHERE PAL we just see want we want see whats convenient for us . Thats how it is sir....
So you're happy as an American tax payer to help pay the $4.2 Billion the illegal aliens get?
jbrgn

United States

#44 Oct 9, 2013
Cricket 23 wrote:
<quoted text>
So you're happy as an American tax payer to help pay the $4.2 Billion the illegal aliens get?
im mexican myself bro..i dont think those numbers are accurate..Do you have accurate statements to find out how much money your government steals i mean..um..what else can we call it..thats why they borrow so much to help get out of depth but y is America going through through this huge economic crisis?? Really think about it?

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