It's the Guns, Stupid

Apr 20, 2007 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Truthdig

“And that's the end of the issue”

Why do we have the same futile argument every time there is a mass killing? Advocates of gun control try to open a discussion about whether more reasonable weapons statutes might reduce the number of violent ... via Truthdig

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91,701 - 91,720 of 103,234 Comments Last updated Jun 22, 2014
GoGoBar

Thailand

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#97713
Jan 21, 2013
 
Donald Duck's cartoon script is a rewrite of the Orwellian theme 1948.
The little black duck's cartoon is a total revamp of the Orwellian Farm scenario which has a much happier ending when the pigs in top hats are finally outed.
boo

Moscow, Russia

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#97714
Jan 21, 2013
 
I SOMETIMES wonder why on earth do people keep ducks? They need more space than chickens, eat more food, and mess up the land in winter. In spring, rampaging drakes drive me mad.

But they have lots of advantages over poultry. Ducks happily live outside in all weathers; their housing is cheaper than a chicken house; they can be easily confined in their breeding pens; and they have a lot of sense. Show ducks where to go once or twice, and they will remember what you want them to do next time. That's why they are used to train sheep dogs. Imagine doing sheepdog demonstrations at a show with chickens!


Before buying any new stock, there are several things one should always consider: How much time have you got to look after the ducks? Do you have enough space and water to keep them? What happens when you are on holiday? And what arrangements can you make when you are back late and cannot shut them up? Livestock is always a big responsibility and, like any other animal, ducks should not be bought without considerable forethought about their safety and welfare.

When choosing to keep ducks, it is also very important to start with the right breed.

If you only want ducks for fun - not for eggs or for the table - then the smaller domestic ducks such as Call Ducks and Miniature Appleyards are cheaper to keep than the larger birds. Their appetite is smaller and, of course, they require less space.
boo

Moscow, Russia

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#97715
Jan 21, 2013
 
These little ducks are kept as pets and as show birds, Calls ducks especially for the array of colour varieties. They are generally poor layers, however, but great characters. Miniature Appleyards can be good layers and sitters and, in fact, are useful all-round birds.

The larger ducks range in size from 2-2.5 kg (4-5 lbs) in the Khaki Campbell to 4-5 kg (9-12lbs) in the exhibition Aylesbury and Rouen. Khaki Campbells are the world's best egg layers and, if eggs are your requirement, this is the breed to keep. In the middle-weight range are the "dual purpose" birds. These are large enough to provide reasonable carcasses for the table, but they can also lay 150-200 eggs per year. They include breeds such as the Blue Swedish, Buff Orpington and Silver Appleyard. At the "heavy weight" end are the Rouen and the real Aylesbury. These lay fewer eggs and were originally developed almost purely as table birds. Today, the larger breeds are kept mainly for exhibition purposes. By necessity, to keep the breed characteristics, the gene pools of pure breeds are restricted.

If the ducks are to be primarily commercial, then a pure breed may not be required. See previous articles in Smallholder 2005 on table ducks and laying strains.

The bigger breeds obviously need more space. The amount of land will depend upon the size of the breed and its habits, the type of soil in the area and your strength of preference for ducks or a tidy garden. Four average-size ducks might be all right on a patch of land about five metres square (25 square metres) minimum, but this will depend very much on the type of soil and the availability of water. On free-draining sandy soils or limestone, there may be no problem. On clay soil in winter there could be quite a mess. If the birds have access to clean water flowing through their space, then the stocking density can be much higher than with limited water.
boo

Moscow, Russia

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#97716
Jan 21, 2013
 
Traditionally, ducks have been reared in areas with gravely river bottoms and sandy soils. There is a good reason for this: ducks do make a mess on water-logged clay soils where the beak is able to probe the soft soil for worms very easily. Ducks also stay healthier and free of leg infections on a free-draining soil.

If confined, ducks can destroy a patch of grass very quickly in wet weather. Big birds do this faster than Call ducks which is why Calls are better for gardens. If you do have plenty of space, or the ducks are required to forage in the vegetable garden for slugs anyway, then there is little problem. If you only have a small space and want the duck area to be tidy, then you may have to invest in making a gravel pen where mud cannot be puddled.

There is no problem with ducks in dry weather and in the summer when the ground is not moist for very long and the grass repairs itself quickly. In a particularly wet spell in winter, the birds may be best confined to a small gravel, or concrete, area or a stable to prevent then doing their worst.
The Fixers

San Jose, CA

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#97717
Jan 21, 2013
 
boo wrote:
These little ducks are kept as pets and as show birds, Calls ducks especially for the array of colour varieties. They are generally poor layers, however, but great characters. Miniature Appleyards can be good layers and sitters and, in fact, are useful all-round birds.
The larger ducks range in size from 2-2.5 kg (4-5 lbs) in the Khaki Campbell to 4-5 kg (9-12lbs) in the exhibition Aylesbury and Rouen. Khaki Campbells are the world's best egg layers and, if eggs are your requirement, this is the breed to keep. In the middle-weight range are the "dual purpose" birds. These are large enough to provide reasonable carcasses for the table, but they can also lay 150-200 eggs per year. They include breeds such as the Blue Swedish, Buff Orpington and Silver Appleyard. At the "heavy weight" end are the Rouen and the real Aylesbury. These lay fewer eggs and were originally developed almost purely as table birds. Today, the larger breeds are kept mainly for exhibition purposes. By necessity, to keep the breed characteristics, the gene pools of pure breeds are restricted.
If the ducks are to be primarily commercial, then a pure breed may not be required. See previous articles in Smallholder 2005 on table ducks and laying strains.
The bigger breeds obviously need more space. The amount of land will depend upon the size of the breed and its habits, the type of soil in the area and your strength of preference for ducks or a tidy garden. Four average-size ducks might be all right on a patch of land about five metres square (25 square metres) minimum, but this will depend very much on the type of soil and the availability of water. On free-draining sandy soils or limestone, there may be no problem. On clay soil in winter there could be quite a mess. If the birds have access to clean water flowing through their space, then the stocking density can be much higher than with limited water.
Feeding Indian Runners^^^^^^ boo Good Aussies

One of the first things new duck keepers want to know is:'What do ducks eat?' There isnt a simple answer: the diet varies depending on the time of year and the conditions under which your birds are kept. If ducks are genuinely free-range they will find most of their own food. This will include a lot of slugs and worms and insects found in the grass, stream and garden. Their diet will also include greens, such as grass and duck-weed. Birds fed like this will have tight, glossy feathers and a bright orange beak (in the orange/yellow billed breeds). This bright colour comes from natural substances found in greens. However, most of us cannot allow our birds such liberty for fear of foxes. Also, even free-range birds do not mind being offered food from bags, especially to fill up before a long winter night.

“REFUSE ALL IMITATIONS!!”

Since: Jan 11

Hampton Park, Australia

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#97719
Jan 21, 2013
 

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Ahomana wrote:
<quoted text>
You have nothing of note to say about the topic at hand it is about guns NOT ducks dummy....ROTFLMFAO..
Do you think he might be ducking the issue?:)
boo

Moscow, Russia

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#97720
Jan 21, 2013
 
Ducks quack and drakes squawk when handled. It is surprising how many people have not noticed the difference, but you do need to know the sex of the birds when buying. Young ducks, less than four weeks old, scarcely quack. They can only be sexed by vent-sexing which some vendors may be prepared to do. Otherwise you will not know the sexes. By six weeks old, certain colours can be sexed by slight differences in the bill colour and rump feathers. Ducks give a good quack by six weeks of age

Healthy ducks are lively. If you intend to buy a bird, watch its behaviour. It should be keen on eating, have sleek plumage (unless moulting) and a bright eye. Unless very tame, it will not want to be picked up. Once a bird is caught, have a close look at it in your hands. Check its eyes; they should be clear with no opaque growth. The birds should not be suffering from sinus problems (puffy cheeks). The legs should be sound with no hot swelling. Toes should be straight (not crooked).

Do not buy birds which are thin and have a sharp breast bone with little flesh on the breast. They may just need better feeding or worming, but they may have a long-term problem.
boo

Moscow, Russia

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#97721
Jan 21, 2013
 
Introducing new chickens to a flock can be difficult, because the "pecking order" has to be observed. A new hen can be given a tough time by the resident females, and should not be put into a new shed with no escape.

Adult ducks are different. A new female put down in a group of ducks is generally well accepted after a short period of inspection and greeting, and ducks are unlikely to inflict serious damage on each other. Occasionally, males may persistently scrap with one another and then have to be separated.

The exception to good behaviour is where there are too many drakes. Females should never be kept with a lot of drakes. Surplus males are not kept in domestic flocks of animals or birds because they are uneconomical and cause problems.

The same is true of drakes. Two or more males which repeatedly mate the same female are a nuisance and a danger, and need separating, even if this means that surplus males are put in a "drakes-only" pen.

A new female needs to be watched if there is more than one drake in the flock to make sure that she is treated well.

Mating is rather inelegantly but appropriately called "treading." This is a precarious activity without the active consent of the duck. Unfortunately, with too many drakes, the ducks literally get very run down and bedraggled, with the females failing to escape the attentions of the drakes.

Ducks can die in these conditions; they may suffer from damaged eyes and prolapse of the oviduct. Also, too much mating does not do the drakes any good either; they can suffer from prolapse of the penis. So it is best to avoid problems by not keeping too many drakes in the same breeding pen. Although it may take more time and work, ducks should be kept in small groups to safeguard the females.

However, if you only want to keep a flock of drakes as quiet pets, then they will probably get on amicably, as long as they have been brought up together and there are no females around for them to compete over. If you do wish to keep a small colony of pet drakes, introduce them all at the same time, so that they are on equal terms.

Settling down new stock When you arrive home with the new adult birds, put them straight in their new shed to settle down after the journey. Although the ducks should not be fed and watered in their shed on a regular basis it is a good idea to give them a bowl of water with a handful of wheat in it if they have travelled on a hot day. If a bird is suffering from heat stress, put it straight on to water (as long as it cannot escape).

Make sure your ducks are securely penned in a wired run to start with. If they have come from a place with a lot of ducks it may be a bit of a culture shock to move to a two-duck house. Their first instinct will be to find the other ducks. If you have a dog, and the birds are unused to other animals, they will also be upset by the new creature. However good your dog may be with the poultry, the new birds need to get used to the new situation gradually.

Most domesticated ducks cannot fly; they are too heavy. The exceptions are the smaller Call Ducks and Bantam breeds. Ask advice about wing clipping (to prevent the birds flying away) when the birds are bought.

Once they have had a chance to settle in, find out what they like best. They may have already acquired a taste for bread so feeding them a favourite titbit will make them tame. The best way to get them tame is to let them get a bit hungry. Do not leave food out ad lib. Let them associate food with your approach.

And do look after new ducks. Don't dump them on a lake with an island and expect them all to be OK
Dr Freud

Hatfield, UK

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#97722
Jan 21, 2013
 

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Ahomana wrote:
For Petes sake, 85% of people who either are or live with NRA members support background checks.
Seriously, lets do this! The president said Wednesday Congress needs to move quickly. Obama named universal background check legislation as the first bill.
Do eeeeet, do eeeet now.....get them suckers.
A 'background check' needs to be done on YOU!
Right along with a body cavity check!
ARE THERE ANY VOLUNTEERS for that?!?!

Since: Dec 10

Brisbane, Australia

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#97723
Jan 21, 2013
 

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The ADELAIDEAN wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you think he might be ducking the issue?:)
I think he is being re-duckulous....:)
GoGoBar

Thailand

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#97724
Jan 21, 2013
 
After ever increasing multiple slaughters in duckling hatcheries by Tasmanian Devils,in disgust Daffy decides enough is enough and somthing must be done.

But Elma Fudd (and his poison makers) are up to their old tricks. With his trusty gun in hand Elma calls for all ducks to be given MORE of the same steroids as the Tasmanian Devil. But this experiment is unproven and can only make more Tasmanian Devils who are apt to strike anywhere, anytime with any gun.
So the steroid quacks blindly and willfully continue the call to dope the Farm, until the doping agencies force Elma to go on Oprah in contrition.
boo

Moscow, Russia

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#97725
Jan 21, 2013
 
The Small Home Flock
In areas where poultry raising is allowed and space is available, a small flock of ducks can be kept in the yard of a household at a low cost. Except for a brooder, which is needed for the first week or so, the main facilities and equipment needed to get started are a simple structure, such as a partially-enclosed shed, inexpensive fencing, a feed hopper or trough made of wood and a simply constructed watering device. The shelter should be located on a high, well-drained area of the yard. Whenever available, sandy soil is preferable for the duck yard because it drains quickly after a rain. The earth floor of the sheltered area should be bedded with straw, shavings or similarly dry absorbent material. Low fencing (about 61cm) is satisfactory for Pekins, since they do not fly, but not for Muscovies, which are adept to becoming airborne. If predators are a problem at night, the open areas of the shed and pen may have to be covered with inexpensive netting or wire mesh.

Raising Ducks on Open Ponds
Ducks may be kept successfully on open ponds, provided a nearby dry sheltered area is available. Ducks kept on ponds may obtain part of their food from plant and animal life in and around the pond, but supplemental feeding will probably be necessary. In tropical areas it is common to combine duck raising on ponds with fish farming. Ponds are stocked with fish such as Tilapia which are raised for human food. Manure from the ducks provide nutrients for growth of animal and plant life which the fish consume. The number of ducks kept on ponds must be limited to prevent an over-supply of nutrients and overgrowth of plant life which will cause depletion of oxygen in the water and kill the fish. Usually both the ducks and fish are given supplemental feed, which on commercial duck/fish farms is often a nutritionally complete pelleted ration

Since: Dec 10

Brisbane, Australia

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#97726
Jan 21, 2013
 

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Dr Freud wrote:
<quoted text>
A 'background check' needs to be done on YOU!
Right along with a body cavity check!
ARE THERE ANY VOLUNTEERS for that?!?!
More nonsense from the fraudulent doctor Fraud....
boo

Moscow, Russia

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#97727
Jan 21, 2013
 
Brooding
Much of the information on brooding chicks, available in poultry textbooks and other sources (see Publications), can be applied to ducklings. If ducklings are hatched artificially, rather than by a broody duck, the caretaker must provide the newly hatched ducklings with a warm dry brooding area free of drafts, with a source of heat, such as radiant or hover-type gas brooders, and feed and drinking water located near the heat source so that the ducklings learn to drink and eat soon after they are placed in the brooder. If ducklings haven't learn to drink within a few hours, it may be necessary to dip their bills in the drinking water in order to coax them to start drinking. In the case of earth or cement floors, the brooding area should be bedded with clean dry litter such as wood shavings or chopped straw. If drafts are a problem, newspapers may be put down on wire floors for the first few days. Use brooder guards to keep the ducklings confined to the area where the heat, water and feed are located. The brooder guards should allow enough room so that the ducklings can move away from the heat if it gets too warm. See Table 1 for recommended temperatures, which are gradually lowered as the duckling grows. In addition, ducklings should be allowed access to more of the floor area of the pen as they grow older. When outside temperatures are above 70F (21.1C), ducklings can be allowed outdoors part of the day after about 14 days of age.

Optimum temperatures for ducks
At the time of hatching, ducklings require a high temperature of about 86F (30C). They are not yet able to regulate their body temperature and must have supplemental heat such as that provided by a brooder. As they grow older they become better able to produce and conserve heat, and regulate their body temperature. After a duckling is fully covered with feathers and down, they are able to maintain proper body temperature even when the outside temperature is low.
boo

Moscow, Russia

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#97729
Jan 21, 2013
 
Overcrowding ducks can be extremely detrimental to their health, growth or egg production. Providing adequate floorspace at each stage of development is basic to successful duck raising. While undercrowding is not usually a problem, it is better to stock ducks at near the recommended density (see Table 2 below) in cold weather so that body heat will help warm the room in which the ducks are confined.
boo

Moscow, Russia

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#97730
Jan 21, 2013
 
Flooring for ducks
Duck keepers should avoid flooring that will injure the skin covering the feet and hock joints of ducks. The smooth skin of ducks is not as tough (not as cornified) as that of land fowl, and is more susceptible to injury when ducks are confined on surfaces that are too rough, or abrasive. Slats, wire floors or cage bottoms may cause injury to the feet and legs of ducks, unless these surfaces are smooth, non-abrasive, and free of sharp edges. Stones, mixed with the soil covering the duck yards can also cause injury. The detrimental effect of flooring on ducks increases with the age and size of the duck, and the longer ducks are confined to the flooring. The likelihood of injury is greatly reduced if wire occupies no more one-fourth to one-third of the floor area. Properly constructed wire floors are usually a better choice than slats, which can cause leg deformities as well as injury to skin. If wire floors are used, floors for ducklings under 3 weeks should be constructed of 1.9 cm (3/4 inch) mesh, 12-gauge welded wire, attached to a frame designed to keep the wire flat, and minimize manure accumulation. For ducks over 3 weeks, 2.5 cm (1 inch) mesh is best. Vinyl coated wire is preferable, but smooth galvanized wire is satisfactory.
Management of litter and yards
Ducks drink and excrete more water than chickens or turkeys. Their droppings contain over 90% moisture. It is therefore necessary to take extra measures to maintain litter floors inside sheltered areas in a dry condition. This will require regular addition of fresh bedding, on top of the bedding that has become soiled or wet, and when necessary, cleaning out the old litter and replacing it with fresh litter. Under semi-confinement growing, in which case ducklings spend most of their time outdoors during the day (after the first 3 weeks), waterers should be located outside, as far away from the house as possible. This will reducing tracking water to the litter. During periods when temperatures drop below freezing, water must be provided indoors. Duck yards should be maintained in a clean condition by removing the upper few inches of soil and replacing it with clean soil (preferably sand) whenever necessary.
Feeders and feeding space
Most feeders used for other poultry, are satisfactory for ducks, provided sufficient room is allowed for the larger bill of ducks and their "shoveling" eating motion. If ducks are hand fed, simple trough feeders work fine. If feed hoppers are used, they should be constructed so that feed will slide down freely into the bottom of the hopper as feed is consumed. Providing an apron in front of the feeding area, for catching feed that is dropped or billed out, will reduce feed wastage. During their early stages of growth, ducklings eat frequently, much like chickens. As they grow older they are able to store increasing amounts of feed in their esophagus at each feeding, and thus need to eat less frequently. By about four weeks of age, Pekin ducks can easily consume 100 grams or more of pellets at a single feeding. It is important to provide about 1 inch (2.5 cm) of feeder space per duck for about the first 3 weeks. Afterwards this can be gradually reduced to about half this amount so long as there is no crowding at the feed hoppers. Developing breeders that are being fed an allotted amount of feed each day should be allowed plenty of feeding space so that all birds can eat at once, which requires about 4 inches (10 cm) of linear space per duck.
Tm Clmns

Victoria, Canada

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#97731
Jan 21, 2013
 

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deport fat losers wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah become a retard like the Canadian population eh with that stupid curling game with brooms. eh
That will be fun eh
Come and watch the annual paint drying festival in Winnipeg you hoser.
Man are you really from Ukraine...??

go get drunk... and take more Russian language lessons.

You probably can't even understand curling..

Since: Dec 10

Brisbane, Australia

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#97732
Jan 21, 2013
 
Why does Donald Duck wear a towel when he comes out of the shower, when he doesn't usually wear any pants?

Could this be Boo...a low IQ duck famer/hunter.....WARNING....th is could be distressing for animal lovers...Hunters are right!

http://news.sky.com/story/835388/exclusive-fa...
The Fixers

San Jose, CA

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#97733
Jan 21, 2013
 

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The ADELAIDEAN wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you think he might be ducking the issue?:)
NO ONE CARES ABOUT INSANE Sasquatch IndoMauritian MalBarCACA TOPIX PAID TROLLS, SPAMMERS, REAL AGITATORS and ANARCHISTs

DO NOT EVER SHOW YOUR UGLY LUNATIC hide my ASS! FILTHY DISGUSTING IndoMauritian MalBarCACA IMPOSTOR MUG HERE AGAIN.

http://www.themelbourneclinic.com.au/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Embling_ ...

http://www.forensicare.vic.gov.au/default.asp ...

GET LOST FUDDIHEAD IndoMauritian MalBARCACA IMPOSTOR YOU ARE NOT WANTED HERE.
boo

Moscow, Russia

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#97734
Jan 21, 2013
 
Waterers for ducks (see also Water)
Waterers designed for chickens and turkeys are usually satisfactory for ducks, as long as the size of the duck's bill is considered. Trough, can or jar-type waterers can be used so long as the drinking area is wide enough (at least 4 cm) for the duck to submerge its bill. The same requirement applies to automatic trough, cup or Plasson waterers. Nipple waterers, if properly adjusted for the duck's height, are also satisfactory. If waterers are located indoors where the floor is bedded with litter, waterers should be located on a wire-mesh screen to reduce wetting of the litter. In commercial duck houses it is usually advisable to construct a cement floor drain underneath the water screens. For starting and growing ducks, provide a minimum of about 1 inch (2.5 cm) of linear watering space per duck. Increase this to 2 inches (5.0 cm) per duck for developing and laying breeders. If nipple waterers are used, provide 15 nipples per 100 ducks for starting and growing ducks and 20 nipples/100 ducks for developing and laying breeders. Starting ducklings should always have access to watering cans, jars or troughs until they have learned to drink from nipple waterers.

Ventilation
Duck houses or shelters for small flocks usually do not require mechanical ventilation as used in modern commercial duck buildings. However some ventilation is always necessary when ducks are kept in a house enclosed on all sides. Window openings, and ridge ventilation may provide adequate air exchange. If larger flocks are kept in totally enclosed houses, the use of ventilation fans may be necessary. Proper ventilation of commercial duck buildings requires the expertise of an agricultural engineer or someone with knowledge and experience in designing and ventilating poultry buildings. Modern duck buildings must be adequately insulated for ventilations systems to work properly. Ventilation systems for ducks should deliver a minimum of 0.2 cfm/lb duck weight at .05 inches (water gauge) static pressure and a maximum ventilation rate (when temperatures are above the desired point) of 0.8 cfm/lb duck weight at .02 inches static pressure.

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