It's the Guns, Stupid

It's the Guns, Stupid

There are 103340 comments on the Truthdig story from Apr 20, 2007, titled It's the Guns, Stupid. In it, Truthdig reports that:

“And that's the end of the issue”

Why do we have the same futile argument every time there is a mass killing? Advocates of gun control try to open a discussion about whether more reasonable weapons statutes might reduce the number of violent ... via Truthdig

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Truthdig.

boo

Moscow, Russia

#97730 Jan 21, 2013
Flooring for ducks
Duck keepers should avoid flooring that will injure the skin covering the feet and hock joints of ducks. The smooth skin of ducks is not as tough (not as cornified) as that of land fowl, and is more susceptible to injury when ducks are confined on surfaces that are too rough, or abrasive. Slats, wire floors or cage bottoms may cause injury to the feet and legs of ducks, unless these surfaces are smooth, non-abrasive, and free of sharp edges. Stones, mixed with the soil covering the duck yards can also cause injury. The detrimental effect of flooring on ducks increases with the age and size of the duck, and the longer ducks are confined to the flooring. The likelihood of injury is greatly reduced if wire occupies no more one-fourth to one-third of the floor area. Properly constructed wire floors are usually a better choice than slats, which can cause leg deformities as well as injury to skin. If wire floors are used, floors for ducklings under 3 weeks should be constructed of 1.9 cm (3/4 inch) mesh, 12-gauge welded wire, attached to a frame designed to keep the wire flat, and minimize manure accumulation. For ducks over 3 weeks, 2.5 cm (1 inch) mesh is best. Vinyl coated wire is preferable, but smooth galvanized wire is satisfactory.
Management of litter and yards
Ducks drink and excrete more water than chickens or turkeys. Their droppings contain over 90% moisture. It is therefore necessary to take extra measures to maintain litter floors inside sheltered areas in a dry condition. This will require regular addition of fresh bedding, on top of the bedding that has become soiled or wet, and when necessary, cleaning out the old litter and replacing it with fresh litter. Under semi-confinement growing, in which case ducklings spend most of their time outdoors during the day (after the first 3 weeks), waterers should be located outside, as far away from the house as possible. This will reducing tracking water to the litter. During periods when temperatures drop below freezing, water must be provided indoors. Duck yards should be maintained in a clean condition by removing the upper few inches of soil and replacing it with clean soil (preferably sand) whenever necessary.
Feeders and feeding space
Most feeders used for other poultry, are satisfactory for ducks, provided sufficient room is allowed for the larger bill of ducks and their "shoveling" eating motion. If ducks are hand fed, simple trough feeders work fine. If feed hoppers are used, they should be constructed so that feed will slide down freely into the bottom of the hopper as feed is consumed. Providing an apron in front of the feeding area, for catching feed that is dropped or billed out, will reduce feed wastage. During their early stages of growth, ducklings eat frequently, much like chickens. As they grow older they are able to store increasing amounts of feed in their esophagus at each feeding, and thus need to eat less frequently. By about four weeks of age, Pekin ducks can easily consume 100 grams or more of pellets at a single feeding. It is important to provide about 1 inch (2.5 cm) of feeder space per duck for about the first 3 weeks. Afterwards this can be gradually reduced to about half this amount so long as there is no crowding at the feed hoppers. Developing breeders that are being fed an allotted amount of feed each day should be allowed plenty of feeding space so that all birds can eat at once, which requires about 4 inches (10 cm) of linear space per duck.
Tm Clmns

Victoria, Canada

#97731 Jan 21, 2013
deport fat losers wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah become a retard like the Canadian population eh with that stupid curling game with brooms. eh
That will be fun eh
Come and watch the annual paint drying festival in Winnipeg you hoser.
Man are you really from Ukraine...??

go get drunk... and take more Russian language lessons.

You probably can't even understand curling..

Since: Dec 10

Brisbane, Australia

#97732 Jan 21, 2013
Why does Donald Duck wear a towel when he comes out of the shower, when he doesn't usually wear any pants?

Could this be Boo...a low IQ duck famer/hunter.....WARNING....th is could be distressing for animal lovers...Hunters are right!

http://news.sky.com/story/835388/exclusive-fa...
The Fixers

San Jose, CA

#97733 Jan 21, 2013
The ADELAIDEAN wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you think he might be ducking the issue?:)
NO ONE CARES ABOUT INSANE Sasquatch IndoMauritian MalBarCACA TOPIX PAID TROLLS, SPAMMERS, REAL AGITATORS and ANARCHISTs

DO NOT EVER SHOW YOUR UGLY LUNATIC hide my ASS! FILTHY DISGUSTING IndoMauritian MalBarCACA IMPOSTOR MUG HERE AGAIN.

http://www.themelbourneclinic.com.au/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Embling_ ...

http://www.forensicare.vic.gov.au/default.asp ...

GET LOST FUDDIHEAD IndoMauritian MalBARCACA IMPOSTOR YOU ARE NOT WANTED HERE.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97734 Jan 21, 2013
Waterers for ducks (see also Water)
Waterers designed for chickens and turkeys are usually satisfactory for ducks, as long as the size of the duck's bill is considered. Trough, can or jar-type waterers can be used so long as the drinking area is wide enough (at least 4 cm) for the duck to submerge its bill. The same requirement applies to automatic trough, cup or Plasson waterers. Nipple waterers, if properly adjusted for the duck's height, are also satisfactory. If waterers are located indoors where the floor is bedded with litter, waterers should be located on a wire-mesh screen to reduce wetting of the litter. In commercial duck houses it is usually advisable to construct a cement floor drain underneath the water screens. For starting and growing ducks, provide a minimum of about 1 inch (2.5 cm) of linear watering space per duck. Increase this to 2 inches (5.0 cm) per duck for developing and laying breeders. If nipple waterers are used, provide 15 nipples per 100 ducks for starting and growing ducks and 20 nipples/100 ducks for developing and laying breeders. Starting ducklings should always have access to watering cans, jars or troughs until they have learned to drink from nipple waterers.

Ventilation
Duck houses or shelters for small flocks usually do not require mechanical ventilation as used in modern commercial duck buildings. However some ventilation is always necessary when ducks are kept in a house enclosed on all sides. Window openings, and ridge ventilation may provide adequate air exchange. If larger flocks are kept in totally enclosed houses, the use of ventilation fans may be necessary. Proper ventilation of commercial duck buildings requires the expertise of an agricultural engineer or someone with knowledge and experience in designing and ventilating poultry buildings. Modern duck buildings must be adequately insulated for ventilations systems to work properly. Ventilation systems for ducks should deliver a minimum of 0.2 cfm/lb duck weight at .05 inches (water gauge) static pressure and a maximum ventilation rate (when temperatures are above the desired point) of 0.8 cfm/lb duck weight at .02 inches static pressure.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97735 Jan 21, 2013
Lighting
The length of the laying period of ducks can be increased considerably if supplemental lighting is provided. If supplemental light is not provided, egg production will be seasonal and dependent on changes in natural daylength. Adding artificial light to extend the daily light period to 14-17 hours, and preventing any decrease in day length, will provide adequate light stimulation for ducks to lay continuously for 7-12 months, depending upon their ability to lay, and other conditions. If ducks are confined to a building at night and allowed outdoors during the day (or if confined to non-lightproof housing), the usual practice is to turn artificial lights on at a set time before sunrise, off at a set time after sunrise, then on again before sunset and off after sunset, maintaining a constant light period (14 hours, for example) and a constant dark period (10 hours in this case) each day. Such a lighting regimen is usually implemented with the aid of electric time clocks that turn lights on and off at set times. A light intensity of about 10 lux (1 foot candle) at the duck's eye level is sufficient to stimulate adequate sexual response in both drakes and ducks. In practice, however, breeding and laying ducks are commonly lit to provide 20-30 lux at duck level. Artificial lighting is less important for growing ducks. Ducks are nocturnal, and can find feed and water in the dark. However artificial light is important the first few days to assist ducklings in getting started drinking and eating. Totally confined ducks being grown-out for marketing, as in commercial production, are usually provided some light every day. It is also beneficial to provide dim light by means of low wattage bulbs during dark periods to help prevent stampeding if the flock is disturbed and to discourage feather pecking. During the development period of breeder-layer ducks, it is desirable to avoid either increases or decreases in day-length as much as possible. A recent publication entitled Poultry Lighting by UK scientist Dr. Peter Lewis and Dr. Trevor Morris (see Publications on Ducks and Related Publications) reviews research demonstrating excellent laying performance of Pekin ducks given a constant light regimen of 17 hours/day throughout rearing and laying. It is recommended that this resource be consulted for more information on lighting ducks.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97736 Jan 21, 2013
Waterers for ducks (see also Water)
Waterers designed for chickens and turkeys are usually satisfactory for ducks, as long as the size of the duck's bill is considered. Trough, can or jar-type waterers can be used so long as the drinking area is wide enough (at least 4 cm) for the duck to submerge its bill. The same requirement applies to automatic trough, cup or Plasson waterers. Nipple waterers, if properly adjusted for the duck's height, are also satisfactory. If waterers are located indoors where the floor is bedded with litter, waterers should be located on a wire-mesh screen to reduce wetting of the litter. In commercial duck houses it is usually advisable to construct a cement floor drain underneath the water screens. For starting and growing ducks, provide a minimum of about 1 inch (2.5 cm) of linear watering space per duck. Increase this to 2 inches (5.0 cm) per duck for developing and laying breeders. If nipple waterers are used, provide 15 nipples per 100 ducks for starting and growing ducks and 20 nipples/100 ducks for developing and laying breeders. Starting ducklings should always have access to watering cans, jars or troughs until they have learned to drink from nipple waterers.

Ventilation
Duck houses or shelters for small flocks usually do not require mechanical ventilation as used in modern commercial duck buildings. However some ventilation is always necessary when ducks are kept in a house enclosed on all sides. Window openings, and ridge ventilation may provide adequate air exchange. If larger flocks are kept in totally enclosed houses, the use of ventilation fans may be necessary. Proper ventilation of commercial duck buildings requires the expertise of an agricultural engineer or someone with knowledge and experience in designing and ventilating poultry buildings. Modern duck buildings must be adequately insulated for ventilations systems to work properly. Ventilation systems for ducks should deliver a minimum of 0.2 cfm/lb duck weight at .05 inches (water gauge) static pressure and a maximum ventilation rate (when temperatures are above the desired point) of 0.8 cfm/lb duck weight at .02 inches static pressure
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97737 Jan 21, 2013
The Duck Laboratory came into existence in 1949 as a result of a working relationship between duck producers on Long Island and Cornell University. At that time, very little scientific research was being carried out on ducks. In contrast, a considerable amount of research was being conducted at a number of universities on chicken and turkey production. The relatively small size of the duck industry in the United States, compared to the chicken and turkey industries, placed the duck industry at a decided disadvantage in obtaining financial support for research. To help overcome this obstacle, the duck growers made a commitment to pay a large portion of the cost of research themselves through the payment of dues and fees. An agreement between Cornell University, and what was soon to become the Long Island Duck Research Cooperative was reached to establish and operate a duck laboratory at Eastport, New York. The laboratory initially operated in a rented building in Eastport. Construction of the present research facility on a 75 acre tract of land in Eastport began in 1955.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97738 Jan 21, 2013
As duck production grew in other parts of North America, participation in the laboratory by duck producers located outside of New York increased, and many of these producers helped support the laboratory financially. In addition duck producers in Canada and other countries as well became supporters of the duck laboratory. In order to reflect its diverse makeup the name of the research cooperative was changed to the International Duck Research Cooperative (IDRC) in 1992

Diagnostic Laboratory Service
The Duck Laboratory is equipped to run all tests necessary to accurately diagnose diseases of ducks. Experienced duck disease specialists are on staff who can advise growers on the best methods of treatment and control. Testing includes isolation, identification and serotyping of causative agents due to the fact that successful prevention and treatment is often contingent upon up-to-date information on the serotypes responsible for a given disease problem on a particular farm. Monitoring the level of disease protection (antibody) present in breeders and their progeny is another service provided by the lab that pertains to the control of diseases such as duck viral hepatitis. In addition to ducks, all other major species of poultry, pet birds, and wild and captive fowl of all kinds are accepted for examination
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97739 Jan 21, 2013
Recognizing the need for assistance in solving problems related to producing healthy ducks , American duck growers on Long Island, in the late 1940's, petitioned Cornell University for assistance in conducting scientifically based research on diseases, nutrition and management of ducks, and other related areas, and providing services not available elsewhere. The Deans of the Colleges of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture at Cornell responded favorably by establishing a working relationship with what was later to become the Long Island Duck Research Cooperative. As a result, the Duck Research Laboratory was established on Eastern Long Island at Eastport, New York in 1949.

The research and service programs are administered by Cornell through a local laboratory director working under the advisement of the research cooperative board of directors. The research is conducted by Cornell scientists located at the Long Island facility. Service programs, such as biologics production and distribution, diagnostic services and consultation are also carried out by the local laboratory staff. Members of the research cooperative help support the laboratory financially by paying membership dues and fees on the biologics they use.

Although originally formed by Long Island duck producers, membership in the research cooperative expanded over the years to include duck producers (and other types of duck keepers and feed manufacturers as well) located in other states, and other countries. In order to reflect its diverse membership, the name of the cooperative was changed in 1992 to the International Duck Research Cooperative (IDRC).

Membership
Presently, two types of membership in the cooperative are recognized; (1) Regular members (commercial duck producers) and (2) Contributing members (mainly duck feed manufacturers, other types of duck keepers and friends of the duck laboratory).

How to Become a Member of the IDRC
Parties interested in becoming either a regular or contributing member of the International Duck Research Cooperative should contact Dr. Tirath Sandhu.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97740 Jan 21, 2013
From ancient times domestic ducks have served as a source of food and income for people in many parts of the world. Ducks are a source of meat, eggs and down-feathers (for making bedding and warm jackets). Ducks are able to subsist and grow to maturity on relatively simple diets, based on locally available feedstuffs. Duck meat and duck eggs are good dietary sources of high quality protein, energy and several vitamins and minerals. When properly included as part of a well balanced daily diet, duck meat and eggs can supply a substantial portion of the nutrients required by humans. Ducks may be raised in small or large flocks. A small flock of ducks may be kept by a household as a supplemental source of food or income. A small flock of ducks can be established at low cost. A higher investment is required to establish larger, or commercial flocks, which require better buildings, equipment and feeds. However, greater income, supporting several families may be realized if a large flock is properly managed.

Domestic ducks fall into the following major genetic classifications:
The Fixers

San Jose, CA

#97742 Jan 21, 2013
boo wrote:
From ancient times domestic ducks have served as a source of food and income for people in many parts of the world. Ducks are a source of meat, eggs and down-feathers (for making bedding and warm jackets). Ducks are able to subsist and grow to maturity on relatively simple diets, based on locally available feedstuffs. Duck meat and duck eggs are good dietary sources of high quality protein, energy and several vitamins and minerals. When properly included as part of a well balanced daily diet, duck meat and eggs can supply a substantial portion of the nutrients required by humans. Ducks may be raised in small or large flocks. A small flock of ducks may be kept by a household as a supplemental source of food or income. A small flock of ducks can be established at low cost. A higher investment is required to establish larger, or commercial flocks, which require better buildings, equipment and feeds. However, greater income, supporting several families may be realized if a large flock is properly managed.
Domestic ducks fall into the following major genetic classifications:
SupaAussie is a poofter bastardd convicted retarded paedophile.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97743 Jan 21, 2013
Choosing the right Breed of Duck.
Choose a breed of duck that best suits your needs. This may be a native breed that is well adapted to the weather conditions of the area where you live, or it may be a breed that performs better than local breeds, available from duck keepers in other areas or from a commercial breeder.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97744 Jan 21, 2013
Meat Type Breeds
If you are mainly interested in meat, and able to obtain the necessary feed or feed ingredients required, choose a meat-type breed like the Pekin. Pekin ducks grow rapidly, reaching approximately 90% of their adult weight at 7 weeks of age, when properly fed. It is not uncommon for commercially grown Pekin ducks to weight 7 lb.(3.2 kg) at 7 weeks of age. Their growth rate under less favorable conditions will depend upon the quality of the diet they are fed. But even under less optimum conditions, Pekins can do quite well. The meat from Pekin ducks is very tender and succulent and known worldwide for its delicious taste. Some meat-type breeds, such as the Aylesbury and Rouen, and unimproved lines of Pekins as well, have become less popular in recent times due in part to the development of improved Commercial lines of Pekin or other white-feathered Pekin-like ducks.

The Muscovy duck is also a popular meat duck in some areas of the world. This breed is presently very popular in France. The large breast muscle of the male (often weighing 700 grams at 13 weeks) gives this breed an advantage over common ducks which have considerably less breast muscle. However the large difference in body size between the Muscovy drake and duck , as already mentioned, as well as the fact that Muscovies have lower fertility rates than most breeds of common ducks, are major shortcomings.

Commercial Muscovy breeders in France, however, have partially overcome this reproductive deficiency through genetic selection. Mule ducks are an improvement over the pure Muscovy in that the difference in size between males and females is not nearly as great, and are superior to the Pekin in that they have more lean meat.

Egg Type Breeds
If eggs for human consumption are the product desired, choose a high egg producing breed of duck such as the Khaki Campbell, Tsaiya or Indian Runner. These breeds are capable of laying in excess of 230, and in some cases, over 300 eggs per year. These breeds are usually considerably smaller in body size than meat-type ducks. Although Pekin ducks are usually bred for their meat, some high egg producing commercial strains of Pekin or Pekin-like ducks have been developed.
The Fixers

San Jose, CA

#97745 Jan 21, 2013
boo wrote:
Meat Type Breeds
If you are mainly interested in meat, and able to obtain the necessary feed or feed ingredients required, choose a meat-type breed like the Pekin. Pekin ducks grow rapidly, reaching approximately 90% of their adult weight at 7 weeks of age, when properly fed. It is not uncommon for commercially grown Pekin ducks to weight 7 lb.(3.2 kg) at 7 weeks of age. Their growth rate under less favorable conditions will depend upon the quality of the diet they are fed. But even under less optimum conditions, Pekins can do quite well. The meat from Pekin ducks is very tender and succulent and known worldwide for its delicious taste. Some meat-type breeds, such as the Aylesbury and Rouen, and unimproved lines of Pekins as well, have become less popular in recent times due in part to the development of improved Commercial lines of Pekin or other white-feathered Pekin-like ducks.
The Muscovy duck is also a popular meat duck in some areas of the world. This breed is presently very popular in France. The large breast muscle of the male (often weighing 700 grams at 13 weeks) gives this breed an advantage over common ducks which have considerably less breast muscle. However the large difference in body size between the Muscovy drake and duck , as already mentioned, as well as the fact that Muscovies have lower fertility rates than most breeds of common ducks, are major shortcomings.
Commercial Muscovy breeders in France, however, have partially overcome this reproductive deficiency through genetic selection. Mule ducks are an improvement over the pure Muscovy in that the difference in size between males and females is not nearly as great, and are superior to the Pekin in that they have more lean meat.
Egg Type Breeds
If eggs for human consumption are the product desired, choose a high egg producing breed of duck such as the Khaki Campbell, Tsaiya or Indian Runner. These breeds are capable of laying in excess of 230, and in some cases, over 300 eggs per year. These breeds are usually considerably smaller in body size than meat-type ducks. Although Pekin ducks are usually bred for their meat, some high egg producing commercial strains of Pekin or Pekin-like ducks have been developed.
SupaAussie is a Pekin-like poofter bastardd convicted retarded paedophile.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97746 Jan 21, 2013
Multi-purpose breeds
Often ducks are kept as a source of both meat and eggs, and for their feathers as well. A number of breeds such as the Pekin, Aylesbury, and Maya (China) can meet these requirements. Some compromise is necessary when a strain is selected for both meat and eggs. Generally ducks that reach heavy weights at market age are not the best egg layers, and ducks that are good egg producers, are smaller in body size. A dual purpose line is usually selected for moderate body size and satisfactory egg production. Local breeds are often good choices if both meat and eggs are needed.

Ducks for Herding
For centuries, ducks in the rice producing areas of the Orient have been managed under the traditional herding system. Under this system, native ducks are selected for generations for their ability to glean most of their food from harvested rice fields, levees, swamps and waterways. A flock of herded ducks may be the major source of income for one or more families. Examples of breeds of ducks selected for herding are the Alabio and Bali of Indonesia and the native Maya in China. The name "Maya" (house duck) refers to a very common duck found in the rice growing areas of China. The feather coloring of Mayas resembles that of the female Mallard, and for this reason, Mayas are sometimes called "Sparrow Ducks". In addition to the Maya, there are a number of distinct lines or breeds in China, such as the Shao (Shaoxing brown duck), Gaoyou, Jinding, Baisha, Yellow Colophony, and of course the Pekin (Beijing duck).
The Fixers

San Jose, CA

#97747 Jan 21, 2013
boo wrote:
Multi-purpose breeds
Often ducks are kept as a source of both meat and eggs, and for their feathers as well. A number of breeds such as the Pekin, Aylesbury, and Maya (China) can meet these requirements. Some compromise is necessary when a strain is selected for both meat and eggs. Generally ducks that reach heavy weights at market age are not the best egg layers, and ducks that are good egg producers, are smaller in body size. A dual purpose line is usually selected for moderate body size and satisfactory egg production. Local breeds are often good choices if both meat and eggs are needed.
Ducks for Herding
For centuries, ducks in the rice producing areas of the Orient have been managed under the traditional herding system. Under this system, native ducks are selected for generations for their ability to glean most of their food from harvested rice fields, levees, swamps and waterways. A flock of herded ducks may be the major source of income for one or more families. Examples of breeds of ducks selected for herding are the Alabio and Bali of Indonesia and the native Maya in China. The name "Maya" (house duck) refers to a very common duck found in the rice growing areas of China. The feather coloring of Mayas resembles that of the female Mallard, and for this reason, Mayas are sometimes called "Sparrow Ducks". In addition to the Maya, there are a number of distinct lines or breeds in China, such as the Shao (Shaoxing brown duck), Gaoyou, Jinding, Baisha, Yellow Colophony, and of course the Pekin (Beijing duck).
SupaAussie is a Pekin-like and of course the Pekin (Beijing duck) poofter Shao (Shaoxing brown duck), Gaoyou, Jinding, Baisha, Yellow Colophony bastardd convicted retarded paedophile.
Firoz

Pakistan

#97748 Jan 21, 2013
The Fixers wrote:
<quoted text>
SupaAussie is a Pekin-like and of course the Pekin (Beijing duck) poofter Shao (Shaoxing brown duck), Gaoyou, Jinding, Baisha, Yellow Colophony bastardd convicted retarded paedophile.
dont attack muslims, we fix you.
The Fixers

San Jose, CA

#97749 Jan 21, 2013
Firoz wrote:
<quoted text>
dont attack muslims, we fix you.
Having a ball there too having butt sex with the 24 million single men, boo sucky sucky and of course the Pekin (Beijing duck) poofter Shao (Shaoxing brown duck), Gaoyou, Jinding, Baisha, Yellow Colophony bastardd convicted retarded paedophile?
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97750 Jan 21, 2013
Regardless of how ducks obtain their food, whether it be by scavenging, or consuming a complete ration, the food consumed must contain all the nutrients, in an available form, that are needed for maintenance, growth and reproduction. Feeding practices will depend in part on the number of ducks raised. If only a few ducks are kept by a household, and they have access to areas where they can forage, they may be able to survive, grow and lay eggs by consuming available food such as green plants, insects, snails, frogs, and table scraps. Under such conditions, ducks will likely grow very slowly and produce a small number of eggs. Herded ducks are an exception, but they require access to large areas where food is available and the care of a herdsman. If keepers of small home flocks want better growth and more eggs they will have to provide supplemental feed. At a minimum they will have to feed some grain. As the size of a home flock increases, it becomes more likely that the flock will not be able to get enough food by foraging and supplemental feeding will become necessary. If more than a few ducks are to be kept, or if increased performance is desired, there are a number of choices of feeding practices:(1) If available and affordable, purchase nutritionally complete commercially prepared duck feeds. If duck rations are not available, and chicken feeds are, they will serve as a satisfactory substitute.(2) If poultry feed concentrates, which when fed with grain constitute a nutritionally complete diet, are available at a reasonable price, this may be a good option. The grain can sometimes be purchased from local farmers at a favorable price.(3) For those with sufficient knowledge of nutrition and feed formulation, complete duck rations may be mixed on the farm. This approach is dependent upon the availability of feed ingredients and vitamin and mineral premixes at affordable prices. Small batches can be mixed by turning the feed on a clean floor with a shovel.

Nutrient requirements of ducks
Ducks require the same nutrients as chickens, but in slightly different amounts, and particularly in terms of the ratio of each nutrient to the energy concentration of the diet.

Protein
Ducks, like other poultry, do not actually require "protein" but the individual amino acids contained in dietary proteins. The proteins in the diet are broken down during digestion to amino acids which are absorbed and used by the duck to make its own body proteins, such as those in muscle and feathers. Certain of these amino acids must be supplied in the diet because the duck cannot make them from other sources. These are called essential amino acids. When formulating feeds for ducks, primary attention is paid to meeting the ducks essential amino acid requirements. Protein levels that meet the ducks amino acid requirements may vary slightly, depending upon the amino acid content of the ingredients used in each formulation.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

US News Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Barack Obama, our next President (Nov '08) 5 min EasyEed 1,234,133
News Evolution vs. Creation (Jul '11) 6 min DanFromSmithville 164,302
News Divisive anti-gay marriage bill falls in Texas ... 8 min Lawrence Wolf 17
News What Should Citizenship Mean? 8 min xxxrayted 71
News Ireland same-sex marriage 12 min Mullen 250
News GOP's fight for 2016 nomination likely to drag ... 13 min EL Chicano 156
News US Sen. Thad Cochran marries longtime aide, his... 13 min Emily Latella 9
News The President has failed us (Jun '12) 20 min WeDeserveBetter 328,595
Election 'Fox News Sunday' to Host Kentucky Senate Debate (Oct '10) 24 min Limbertwig 182,756
News BARACK OBAMA BIRTH CERTIFICATE: Suit contesting... (Jan '09) 34 min Coffee Party 190,172
More from around the web