It's the Guns, Stupid

It's the Guns, Stupid

There are 103292 comments on the Truthdig story from Apr 20, 2007, titled It's the Guns, Stupid. In it, Truthdig reports that:

“And that's the end of the issue”

Why do we have the same futile argument every time there is a mass killing? Advocates of gun control try to open a discussion about whether more reasonable weapons statutes might reduce the number of violent ... via Truthdig

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Truthdig.

boo

Moscow, Russia

#97699 Jan 21, 2013
If you raise a duck around people and let it depend on people for food, it will not be able to survive in the wild. The ducklings you find at pet stores are not usually even wild breeds of ducks, so they couldn't survive in the wild even if they were raised by their parents. Even if domestic ducks could survive in the place where thet were released, they would breed with the wild ducks in the area and the wild duck population becomes weakened by the domestic ducks that bred with their ancestors. If you really want to raise and release ducks, you have to prevent them from bonding strongly with you, make sure they can obtain their own food, and, most importantly, make absolutely sure that they are a wild, not domestic, breed of duck.
You may not think that there are predators around you, but chances are that there really are quite a few dangerous animals even if you don't have cougars in your back yard. Hawks, cats, raccoons, possums, stray dogs, foxes, and weasels can all be deadly to ducks. That doesn't mean you have to keep your ducks locked up during the day when you're there to keep an eye on them; just by shutting them in at night you eliminate a huge percentage of the dangers.
A common misconception is that it will be more work to take care of two ducks than one on its own. In fact, the exact opposite is true. While you can keep one duck by itself, if you do this it will learn to see itself as human. It will need constant company from you for the rest of its life, and this is no small responsibility. A dog or a cat can easily be left alone for a few hours, but this is not true of a duck. Ducks are such social birds that they will become very lonely very fast, so unless you are willing to buy duck diapers, invite your duck into your home, and spend then next 20 years taking care of it you should not get a lone duck. A pair of ducks, on the other hand, will be perfectly content to live outside and look after themselves for the most part while remaining friendly and affectionate toward you

Since: Jan 12

Where The Wild Things Grow

#97700 Jan 21, 2013
boo wrote:
People are always giving us something. We got our trio of Muscovy ducks one day when a lady who lives near our Country Bookstore in Noroton, Conn., moved. They were breeders and she didn't want to have them killed. Knowing that we had a small farm, she thought we might like them.
There is a good deal to be said for making ducks your second poultry project, particularly if you have any kind of small stream or pond on your place, although neither is necessary. One of the unusual things about ducks is that they are well adapted to either a small place or to large-scale commercial production.
Don't start a duck project unless your family is fond of duck. If you're anywhere near as successful as we've been, you'll have a lot of duck. The trio that was given to us has produced over 25 ducklings in the first six months. Incidentally, Muscovy ducks are better eating, we think, than the ordinary Pekin variety that you get in the market.
Anyway, ducks do furnish delicious variety for the table. Many people like duck eggs, too, especially for cooking. Ducks require relatively little care and are practically free of disease problems. They are efficient and economical meat producers, gaining weight rapidly even when allowed to forage for much of their food.
You have three choices as to how to plan your duck raising program. You can keep a small flock of breeders the year around. You can buy day-old ducklings and brood them like baby chicks, but with less heat and care. Or you can buy duck eggs and hatch them out under hens.
Keeping A Small Flock Of Breeder Ducks
Reasons for owning ducks varies. Some just plain like ducks and like having them around and some would like having some duck eggs for eating or cooking in addition to having duck meat if you have some grass forage land. If you have a stream or pond, keep a small flock of breeders.
You don't have to qualify on all these points to keep a flock of breeders, but if you do, then your flock will practically keep themselves, providing you with plenty of tasty meals from spring until late fall.
If you don't have forage, ducks can be fenced in, but will require more feed. If you don't have the stream or pond, you can provide a sunken trough, half-barrel or pan. You can raise ducks successfully without any water, but they like water to wash themselves in and it is said to be best if the eggs are moistened regularly during the setting. This moistening occurs naturally whenever the ducks return to the nest with wet feathers from bathing.
Can you keep a single duck as a pet or would that be cruel?
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97701 Jan 21, 2013
If your ducks are normal mallard ducks, You may, however, have one of the many breeds of domestic ducks. Domestic ducks are generally larger than mallards, cannot fly, and are often raised for either meat or eggs. They may be more friendly than wild breeds and their feathers may be white, brown, black, or blue.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#97702 Jan 21, 2013
Teaman wrote:
<quoted text>
There's a new brand of McCarthyism these days called racism.:-)
Don't count on anything being done about it. We're just stuck with him.
Very true.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97703 Jan 21, 2013
sairla wrote:
<quoted text>
Can you keep a single duck as a pet or would that be cruel?
Ducks are very social animals and form strong pair-bonds so I would recommend getting a pair or raising a duck with a companion chicken.

You can pick-up ducklings through hatcheries (or you could keep an eye open on Craigslist)
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97704 Jan 21, 2013
Here are my list of pros and cons for keeping ducks

Pros

1. Great sluggers and buggers.

2. Much cold-hardier than chickens

3. Lay first-thing in the morning (around sunrise), regularly throughout the first year and then more seasonally (spring and summer) in subsequent years.

4. Very companionable and intelligent

5. Dual purpose (good for eggs and meat)

6. Some people (about 20%) who are allergic to chicken eggs can eat duck eggs

7. Grow very quickly and need to be outside in a run much earlier than chickens

Cons

1. Phenomenally messy with water and feed (water is spoiled very quickly).

2. Poop a lot more than chickens and very wet (need to clean the coop/run more frequently)

3. Eat more than chickens

4. Female ducks tend to be quite vocal (compared to chickens) when upset (like, hey my water is frozen over and you need to come do something about it).

5. Ducklings are incredibly messy and smelly (compared to chicks) so you will need a run or a larger-brooder prepared (outside) within about 3-4 weeks and it will need to be cleaned more frequently.

6. If you get ducks that are mainly bred for meat you have to watch their weight gain if kept inactive and heat exposure in summer. Dual-purpose breeds such as peking-peking are great layers but also put on a lot of weight if not aloud to roam
Patriot

Boulder, CO

#97705 Jan 21, 2013
EXERCISE YOUR UNALIENABLE RIGHTS WITH RESPECT FOR OTHERS

AND NEVER LET PEOPLE IN GOVERNMENT DEPRIVE YOU OF THEM!

"There exists a law, not written down anywhere, but in our hearts; a law which comes to us not by training or custom or reading; a law which has come to us not from theory but from practice; not by instruction but by natural intuition: I refer to the law which lays it down that, if our lives are endangered by plots or violence or armed robbers or enemies, any and every method of protecting ourselves is morally right." -

Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC-43 BC) Roman Orator and Statesman at the trial of T. Annius Milo in 52 BC

----

"It is a just person who disobeys an unjust law."
Plato (427-347 BC)

----

"Tyranny derives from the oligarchy's mistrust of the people; hence they deprive them of arms, ill-treat the lower class, and keep them from residing in the capital. These are common to oligarchy and tyranny."

Aristotle in Politics (J. Sinclair translation, pg. 218, 1962)

----

"It is also in the interests of a tyrant to keep his people poor, so that they may not be able to afford the cost of protecting themselves by arms and be so occupied with their daily tasks that they have no time for rebellion."

Aristotle in Politics (J. Sinclair translation, pg. 226, 1962)

----

He said to them, "But now if you have a purse, take it, and also a bag; and if you don't have a sword, sell your cloak and buy one." Jesus of Nazareth, Luke 22:36

http://www.unalienable.com/

Regarding your Right to acquire and enjoy property:

http://www.idahopress.com/opinion/bestread/pr...

http://nstarzone.com/PTAX.html
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97706 Jan 21, 2013
Raising Ducklings and Feeding

House in a water-proof cage with cleanable surfaces.
Line with paper or shavings that can be cleaned daily
Provide a heat source for warmth and room in the cage so they can move away if too hot.
Provide water that is deep enough for the ducklings to duck their bill up to nostril level for cleaning. Must be shallow enough for the ducklings to exit. Replace twice daily.
Ducklings are very active at night so keep them somewhere where they wont disturb household sleep patterns.
Ducklings are quite fragile so supervise visits with small children
Feed on a meet-bird starter then switch to a meat-bird growing ration around 6 weeks of age (higher protein content than chicken starters). At 15+ weeks switch to a standard layer feed
Have an outside coop ready by the time they are 4 weeks (they grow very quickly)
Ducks love greens and are very happy free-ranging for invertebrates in the garden
Coop & Run Design

Ducks usually lay eggs on the ground so need a suitable bedding (such as straw or chip) to make a nest
They usually sleep on the ground, though some breeds such as Muscovies roost.
During the warmer months they are happy to sleep outside (in an enclosed run) but in winter will need some shelter.
The coop will need an ‘easy-to-clean’ flooring (such as bark chip, earth or straw). Line the run with a deep layer or bark mulch to help reduce odor and aid in drainage
Water must be deep enough to duck their heads, in order to keep their nostrils clear. Whatever water is provided will be fouled very quickly. You must consider how to keep water unfrozen in winter (an electric heated water bucket or daily top-ups). If the ducks have water in which they can swim, an exit ramp must be provided (after excess time in the water their feathers become waterlogged and they can drown. If you see your ducks swimming low in the water, this is the reason)
Ducks and chickens can cohabit though you may have to separate them if the ducks pester the hens excessively. My drake beats-up the chickens if left in the same run throughout the ducks laying season but is very friendly for the rest of the year. Consider this when designing the coop and run.
GoGoBar

Hua Hin, Thailand

#97707 Jan 21, 2013
Daffy duck seems to be in favour over donald duck in the ratings. Nobody can work out what donald is saying wheras "The little black duck" has a clear voice.
The Fixers

San Jose, CA

#97708 Jan 21, 2013
boo wrote:
Raising Ducklings and Feeding
House in a water-proof cage with cleanable surfaces.
Line with paper or shavings that can be cleaned daily
Provide a heat source for warmth and room in the cage so they can move away if too hot.
Provide water that is deep enough for the ducklings to duck their bill up to nostril level for cleaning. Must be shallow enough for the ducklings to exit. Replace twice daily.
Ducklings are very active at night so keep them somewhere where they wont disturb household sleep patterns.
Ducklings are quite fragile so supervise visits with small children
Feed on a meet-bird starter then switch to a meat-bird growing ration around 6 weeks of age (higher protein content than chicken starters). At 15+ weeks switch to a standard layer feed
Have an outside coop ready by the time they are 4 weeks (they grow very quickly)
Ducks love greens and are very happy free-ranging for invertebrates in the garden
Coop & Run Design
Ducks usually lay eggs on the ground so need a suitable bedding (such as straw or chip) to make a nest
They usually sleep on the ground, though some breeds such as Muscovies roost.
During the warmer months they are happy to sleep outside (in an enclosed run) but in winter will need some shelter.
The coop will need an ‘easy-to-clean’ flooring (such as bark chip, earth or straw). Line the run with a deep layer or bark mulch to help reduce odor and aid in drainage
Water must be deep enough to duck their heads, in order to keep their nostrils clear. Whatever water is provided will be fouled very quickly. You must consider how to keep water unfrozen in winter (an electric heated water bucket or daily top-ups). If the ducks have water in which they can swim, an exit ramp must be provided (after excess time in the water their feathers become waterlogged and they can drown. If you see your ducks swimming low in the water, this is the reason)
Ducks and chickens can cohabit though you may have to separate them if the ducks pester the hens excessively. My drake beats-up the chickens if left in the same run throughout the ducks laying season but is very friendly for the rest of the year. Consider this when designing the coop and run.
Excellent new name Good Aussies.

Coop and run.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97709 Jan 21, 2013
My wife objected to me getting ducks as pets, until she saw Call Ducks. This year we got a pair and they are raising some ducklings. Learn more about Call Ducks and keeping them as pets.

The best place to purchase any type of pet is always from a breeder. Breeders can be found by contacting local waterfowl bird clubs. If you are unfamiliar of any in your area talk to the people at your local livestock feed store and keep an eye on their bulletin boards for signs of bird shows and sales. Failing this some areas have auctions for birds and waterfowl. Again the people at the feed store might know more or you can contact the livestock auction markets and ask if they have bird auctions. In my area there are three auction markets that run such auctions, each having two auctions a year. Caution should be used when purchasing from an auction, always walk around earlier and look in the boxes to check the birds for signs of health, and age (some sellers will write the age on the box).



Cost will vary depending on the supply and demand in your area. You should try to get a mated pair if possible as ducks do mate for life this will get you off to a better start if breeding is your goal. Get no more than two females per male.

Because of their small size Call Ducks may be safer from predators (foxes and hawks) if kept in a contained space. Stucco wire with 2 inch squares works well, but chicken wire can also be used. If you are going to be hatching ducklings, be sure the lower portion of the area is fenced with something the little ones cannot walk through. Within their space they need an area for swimming, a kids swimming pool or livestock feed bowl work well. They should also have a proper shelter of some sort, even a dog house will work, this needs to be bedded with straw, and facing away from the winds. Their environment should be interesting, with grass, logs, a shrub or two, and rocks. Keeping them in an enclosed area will mean they cannot fly off, if you are going to let your ducks roam, be sure to contain them for at least two weeks so they know where their home (and food) is. The enclosed space should be at least 10 ft x 10 ft which will house 1 pair of ducks and their young ducklings (larger is always better). If it is sloping to allow water to run away that is even better.
more

Huntsville, AL

#97710 Jan 21, 2013
Patriot wrote:
EXERCISE YOUR UNALIENABLE RIGHTS WITH RESPECT FOR OTHERS
AND NEVER LET PEOPLE IN GOVERNMENT DEPRIVE YOU OF THEM!
"There exists a law, not written down anywhere, but in our hearts; a law which comes to us not by training or custom or reading; a law which has come to us not from theory but from practice; not by instruction but by natural intuition: I refer to the law which lays it down that, if our lives are endangered by plots or violence or armed robbers or enemies, any and every method of protecting ourselves is morally right." -
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC-43 BC) Roman Orator and Statesman at the trial of T. Annius Milo in 52 BC
----
"It is a just person who disobeys an unjust law."
Plato (427-347 BC)
----
"Tyranny derives from the oligarchy's mistrust of the people; hence they deprive them of arms, ill-treat the lower class, and keep them from residing in the capital. These are common to oligarchy and tyranny."
Aristotle in Politics (J. Sinclair translation, pg. 218, 1962)
----
"It is also in the interests of a tyrant to keep his people poor, so that they may not be able to afford the cost of protecting themselves by arms and be so occupied with their daily tasks that they have no time for rebellion."
Aristotle in Politics (J. Sinclair translation, pg. 226, 1962)
----
He said to them, "But now if you have a purse, take it, and also a bag; and if you don't have a sword, sell your cloak and buy one." Jesus of Nazareth, Luke 22:36
http://www.unalienable.com/
Regarding your Right to acquire and enjoy property:
http://www.idahopress.com/opinion/bestread/pr...
http://nstarzone.com/PTAX.html
spam
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97711 Jan 21, 2013
Your local livestock feed store will have a feed mix for ducks, and another for ducklings if you should have some. It is important to note that under no circumstances should ducks be fed started food for chicks. This food has penicillin in it which will kill ducks. They need access to their food at all time. You can also offer washed romaine lettuce, but not other kinds of lettuce. You will note your ducks eating grass, dandelions, and insects, as such you never want to use chemical herbicides or pesticides.

They should also have access to grit for aiding digestion. Even though ducks can drink from their pond this water will soon be muddy so a proper waterer should be provided.

Some people clip the wings of their birds to prevent flight and if you wish to do so (I do not do this) you should have somebody show you how so you do not injure the bird by cutting the wrong feathers.

You can discuss vaccination and health care needs with a veterinarian in your area

Call Ducks have excellent nesting and mothering skills. She will typically lay a clutch of 10-18 eggs and will start sitting on them, typically not all will hatch, but those that do will hatch out 28 days later. The mother will come off the eggs for only brief times each day so it is important she have food at easy access. When the ducklings hatch they will follow their mother who will protectively hide them away from viewing.
Care should be taken when you have new hatchlings. They want to swim but their feathers are not water proof and they can drown. In fact this happened to one of my own ducks ducklings. Instead I suggest filling a low rimmed container, such as a baking dish for making brownies, with water, and placing in a few rocks for them to climb up on. Be sure your regular water is unaccessible to them or fill it with large rocks that can be removed after a 10 days. I like to leave a rock or two in there regularly anyhow as the ducks do enjoy standing on the rocks.



I also want to note that once a year the males will moult and for a short period of time may have feathers the color of the females.
GoGoBar

Hua Hin, Thailand

#97713 Jan 21, 2013
Donald Duck's cartoon script is a rewrite of the Orwellian theme 1948.
The little black duck's cartoon is a total revamp of the Orwellian Farm scenario which has a much happier ending when the pigs in top hats are finally outed.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97714 Jan 21, 2013
I SOMETIMES wonder why on earth do people keep ducks? They need more space than chickens, eat more food, and mess up the land in winter. In spring, rampaging drakes drive me mad.

But they have lots of advantages over poultry. Ducks happily live outside in all weathers; their housing is cheaper than a chicken house; they can be easily confined in their breeding pens; and they have a lot of sense. Show ducks where to go once or twice, and they will remember what you want them to do next time. That's why they are used to train sheep dogs. Imagine doing sheepdog demonstrations at a show with chickens!


Before buying any new stock, there are several things one should always consider: How much time have you got to look after the ducks? Do you have enough space and water to keep them? What happens when you are on holiday? And what arrangements can you make when you are back late and cannot shut them up? Livestock is always a big responsibility and, like any other animal, ducks should not be bought without considerable forethought about their safety and welfare.

When choosing to keep ducks, it is also very important to start with the right breed.

If you only want ducks for fun - not for eggs or for the table - then the smaller domestic ducks such as Call Ducks and Miniature Appleyards are cheaper to keep than the larger birds. Their appetite is smaller and, of course, they require less space.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97715 Jan 21, 2013
These little ducks are kept as pets and as show birds, Calls ducks especially for the array of colour varieties. They are generally poor layers, however, but great characters. Miniature Appleyards can be good layers and sitters and, in fact, are useful all-round birds.

The larger ducks range in size from 2-2.5 kg (4-5 lbs) in the Khaki Campbell to 4-5 kg (9-12lbs) in the exhibition Aylesbury and Rouen. Khaki Campbells are the world's best egg layers and, if eggs are your requirement, this is the breed to keep. In the middle-weight range are the "dual purpose" birds. These are large enough to provide reasonable carcasses for the table, but they can also lay 150-200 eggs per year. They include breeds such as the Blue Swedish, Buff Orpington and Silver Appleyard. At the "heavy weight" end are the Rouen and the real Aylesbury. These lay fewer eggs and were originally developed almost purely as table birds. Today, the larger breeds are kept mainly for exhibition purposes. By necessity, to keep the breed characteristics, the gene pools of pure breeds are restricted.

If the ducks are to be primarily commercial, then a pure breed may not be required. See previous articles in Smallholder 2005 on table ducks and laying strains.

The bigger breeds obviously need more space. The amount of land will depend upon the size of the breed and its habits, the type of soil in the area and your strength of preference for ducks or a tidy garden. Four average-size ducks might be all right on a patch of land about five metres square (25 square metres) minimum, but this will depend very much on the type of soil and the availability of water. On free-draining sandy soils or limestone, there may be no problem. On clay soil in winter there could be quite a mess. If the birds have access to clean water flowing through their space, then the stocking density can be much higher than with limited water.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97716 Jan 21, 2013
Traditionally, ducks have been reared in areas with gravely river bottoms and sandy soils. There is a good reason for this: ducks do make a mess on water-logged clay soils where the beak is able to probe the soft soil for worms very easily. Ducks also stay healthier and free of leg infections on a free-draining soil.

If confined, ducks can destroy a patch of grass very quickly in wet weather. Big birds do this faster than Call ducks which is why Calls are better for gardens. If you do have plenty of space, or the ducks are required to forage in the vegetable garden for slugs anyway, then there is little problem. If you only have a small space and want the duck area to be tidy, then you may have to invest in making a gravel pen where mud cannot be puddled.

There is no problem with ducks in dry weather and in the summer when the ground is not moist for very long and the grass repairs itself quickly. In a particularly wet spell in winter, the birds may be best confined to a small gravel, or concrete, area or a stable to prevent then doing their worst.
The Fixers

San Jose, CA

#97717 Jan 21, 2013
boo wrote:
These little ducks are kept as pets and as show birds, Calls ducks especially for the array of colour varieties. They are generally poor layers, however, but great characters. Miniature Appleyards can be good layers and sitters and, in fact, are useful all-round birds.
The larger ducks range in size from 2-2.5 kg (4-5 lbs) in the Khaki Campbell to 4-5 kg (9-12lbs) in the exhibition Aylesbury and Rouen. Khaki Campbells are the world's best egg layers and, if eggs are your requirement, this is the breed to keep. In the middle-weight range are the "dual purpose" birds. These are large enough to provide reasonable carcasses for the table, but they can also lay 150-200 eggs per year. They include breeds such as the Blue Swedish, Buff Orpington and Silver Appleyard. At the "heavy weight" end are the Rouen and the real Aylesbury. These lay fewer eggs and were originally developed almost purely as table birds. Today, the larger breeds are kept mainly for exhibition purposes. By necessity, to keep the breed characteristics, the gene pools of pure breeds are restricted.
If the ducks are to be primarily commercial, then a pure breed may not be required. See previous articles in Smallholder 2005 on table ducks and laying strains.
The bigger breeds obviously need more space. The amount of land will depend upon the size of the breed and its habits, the type of soil in the area and your strength of preference for ducks or a tidy garden. Four average-size ducks might be all right on a patch of land about five metres square (25 square metres) minimum, but this will depend very much on the type of soil and the availability of water. On free-draining sandy soils or limestone, there may be no problem. On clay soil in winter there could be quite a mess. If the birds have access to clean water flowing through their space, then the stocking density can be much higher than with limited water.
Feeding Indian Runners^^^^^^ boo Good Aussies

One of the first things new duck keepers want to know is:'What do ducks eat?' There isn’t a simple answer: the diet varies depending on the time of year and the conditions under which your birds are kept. If ducks are genuinely free-range they will find most of their own food. This will include a lot of slugs and worms and insects found in the grass, stream and garden. Their diet will also include greens, such as grass and duck-weed. Birds fed like this will have tight, glossy feathers and a bright orange beak (in the orange/yellow billed breeds). This bright colour comes from natural substances found in greens. However, most of us cannot allow our birds such liberty for fear of foxes. Also, even free-range birds do not mind being offered food from bags, especially to fill up before a long winter night.

“REFUSE ALL IMITATIONS!!”

Since: Jan 11

Australia

#97719 Jan 21, 2013
Ahomana wrote:
<quoted text>
You have nothing of note to say about the topic at hand it is about guns NOT ducks dummy....ROTFLMFAO..
Do you think he might be ducking the issue?:)
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97720 Jan 21, 2013
Ducks quack and drakes squawk when handled. It is surprising how many people have not noticed the difference, but you do need to know the sex of the birds when buying. Young ducks, less than four weeks old, scarcely quack. They can only be sexed by vent-sexing which some vendors may be prepared to do. Otherwise you will not know the sexes. By six weeks old, certain colours can be sexed by slight differences in the bill colour and rump feathers. Ducks give a good quack by six weeks of age

Healthy ducks are lively. If you intend to buy a bird, watch its behaviour. It should be keen on eating, have sleek plumage (unless moulting) and a bright eye. Unless very tame, it will not want to be picked up. Once a bird is caught, have a close look at it in your hands. Check its eyes; they should be clear with no opaque growth. The birds should not be suffering from sinus problems (puffy cheeks). The legs should be sound with no hot swelling. Toes should be straight (not crooked).

Do not buy birds which are thin and have a sharp breast bone with little flesh on the breast. They may just need better feeding or worming, but they may have a long-term problem.

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