It's the Guns, Stupid

It's the Guns, Stupid

There are 103299 comments on the Truthdig story from Apr 20, 2007, titled It's the Guns, Stupid. In it, Truthdig reports that:

“And that's the end of the issue”

Why do we have the same futile argument every time there is a mass killing? Advocates of gun control try to open a discussion about whether more reasonable weapons statutes might reduce the number of violent ... via Truthdig

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Truthdig.

boo

Moscow, Russia

#97671 Jan 21, 2013
People are always giving us something. We got our trio of Muscovy ducks one day when a lady who lives near our Country Bookstore in Noroton, Conn., moved. They were breeders and she didn't want to have them killed. Knowing that we had a small farm, she thought we might like them.

There is a good deal to be said for making ducks your second poultry project, particularly if you have any kind of small stream or pond on your place, although neither is necessary. One of the unusual things about ducks is that they are well adapted to either a small place or to large-scale commercial production.

Don't start a duck project unless your family is fond of duck. If you're anywhere near as successful as we've been, you'll have a lot of duck. The trio that was given to us has produced over 25 ducklings in the first six months. Incidentally, Muscovy ducks are better eating, we think, than the ordinary Pekin variety that you get in the market.

Anyway, ducks do furnish delicious variety for the table. Many people like duck eggs, too, especially for cooking. Ducks require relatively little care and are practically free of disease problems. They are efficient and economical meat producers, gaining weight rapidly even when allowed to forage for much of their food.

You have three choices as to how to plan your duck raising program. You can keep a small flock of breeders the year around. You can buy day-old ducklings and brood them like baby chicks, but with less heat and care. Or you can buy duck eggs and hatch them out under hens.

Keeping A Small Flock Of Breeder Ducks

Reasons for owning ducks varies. Some just plain like ducks and like having them around and some would like having some duck eggs for eating or cooking in addition to having duck meat if you have some grass forage land. If you have a stream or pond, keep a small flock of breeders.

You don't have to qualify on all these points to keep a flock of breeders, but if you do, then your flock will practically keep themselves, providing you with plenty of tasty meals from spring until late fall.

If you don't have forage, ducks can be fenced in, but will require more feed. If you don't have the stream or pond, you can provide a sunken trough, half-barrel or pan. You can raise ducks successfully without any water, but they like water to wash themselves in and it is said to be best if the eggs are moistened regularly during the setting. This moistening occurs naturally whenever the ducks return to the nest with wet feathers from bathing.
GoGoBar

Hua Hin, Thailand

#97673 Jan 21, 2013
Which ducks are the best breeders?
The Brown duck, the black duck, the yellow duck or the white duck.
If you interbred them would there be a breed od superduckies?

Since: Dec 10

Brisbane, Australia

#97674 Jan 21, 2013
boo wrote:
People are always giving us something. We got our trio of Muscovy ducks one day when a lady who lives near our Country Bookstore in Noroton, Conn., moved. They were breeders and she didn't want to have them killed. Knowing that we had a small farm, she thought we might like them.
There is a good deal to be said for making ducks your second poultry project, particularly if you have any kind of small stream or pond on your place, although neither is necessary. One of the unusual things about ducks is that they are well adapted to either a small place or to large-scale commercial production.
Don't start a duck project unless your family is fond of duck. If you're anywhere near as successful as we've been, you'll have a lot of duck. The trio that was given to us has produced over 25 ducklings in the first six months. Incidentally, Muscovy ducks are better eating, we think, than the ordinary Pekin variety that you get in the market.
Anyway, ducks do furnish delicious variety for the table. Many people like duck eggs, too, especially for cooking. Ducks require relatively little care and are practically free of disease problems. They are efficient and economical meat producers, gaining weight rapidly even when allowed to forage for much of their food.
You have three choices as to how to plan your duck raising program. You can keep a small flock of breeders the year around. You can buy day-old ducklings and brood them like baby chicks, but with less heat and care. Or you can buy duck eggs and hatch them out under hens.
Keeping A Small Flock Of Breeder Ducks
Reasons for owning ducks varies. Some just plain like ducks and like having them around and some would like having some duck eggs for eating or cooking in addition to having duck meat if you have some grass forage land. If you have a stream or pond, keep a small flock of breeders.
You don't have to qualify on all these points to keep a flock of breeders, but if you do, then your flock will practically keep themselves, providing you with plenty of tasty meals from spring until late fall.
If you don't have forage, ducks can be fenced in, but will require more feed. If you don't have the stream or pond, you can provide a sunken trough, half-barrel or pan. You can raise ducks successfully without any water, but they like water to wash themselves in and it is said to be best if the eggs are moistened regularly during the setting. This moistening occurs naturally whenever the ducks return to the nest with wet feathers from bathing.
You have nothing of note to say about the topic at hand it is about guns NOT ducks dummy....ROTFLMFAO..
Dr Freud

Bethnal Green, UK

#97675 Jan 21, 2013
Teaman wrote:
<quoted text>
There's a new brand of McCarthyism these days called racism.:-)
Don't count on anything being done about it. We're just stuck with him.
Regardless: The results are recorded, and they are known.
Using the EVIDENCE, you can't be called anything except truthful.

Since: Dec 10

Brisbane, Australia

#97676 Jan 21, 2013
It’s Time for Good Australians to Condemn the SSAA
Posted on July 30, 2012 Share this... The Sporting Shooters Association of Australia (SSAA) has continually promoted gun
law policies that would make Australian society similar to the private gun
mayhem society called the USA. Gun Control Australia condemn’s these sickening
policies and the groups that hold on to them such as the SSAA. No organisation
in Australia is working harder to destroy our successful gun laws than the SSAA;
thus it has become an enormous danger to the future of our society. We call on
the Gillard government to break all ties with this ruthlessly selfish organisation
that has such close associations with America’s National Rifle Association
(NRA) and the international gun and ammunition trade.

A week ago major gun control groups in America released this statement concerning
the recent mass gun murder in Colorado.

Over 30 National, State, and Local Gun Violence Prevention Groups Issue Statement
on Colorado Mass Shooting

Washington, DC—Following today’s mass shooting at a Colorado movie theater leaving at least 12 dead and dozens wounded, national, state, and local gun violence prevention organizations (see list at bottom) issued the following joint statement:

“Our deepest sympathies go to all those affected by this terrible tragedy.

“Today’s mass shooting is the price paid in death, pain, and suffering by families and
communities for an out-of-control, militarized gun industry that prides itself
on selling increasingly lethal products to virtually anyone with little concern
for the inevitable tragedies that result. In America today—where virtually
anyone with a credit card and a grudge can outfit their own personal army—mass
shootings are as predictable as they are tragic. Just as predictably, those who
celebrate this lethal shift—the NRA and its gun industry partners—remain mute
when families and communities suffer the consequences. And when attention
fades, they’ll once again resume their lethal trade, unless we stand together
as Americans to stop them.

“Gun violence is preventable. It is long past time for policymakers at all levels to
act. Americans have a right to feel safe in their communities—in schools,
restaurants, movie theaters, and all public places. Using the cynical desires
of the gun lobby and firearms industry as an excuse for inaction is shameful.”

Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and its national network of chapters

Coalition to Stop Gun Violence

Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence

States United to Prevent Gun Violence

Violence Policy Center

Arizonans for Gun Safety

Women Against Gun Violence (California)

Ceasefire Maryland

Ceasefire New Jersey (a project of the Coalition for Peace Action)

Ceasefire Oregon

CeaseFirePA

Colorado Ceasefire

Connecticut Against Gun Violence Education Fund

Georgians for Gun Safety

GunFreeKids.org

Gun Violence Prevention Center of Utah

Hawaii Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence

Hoosiers Concerned About Gun Violence

Illinois Council Against Handgun Violence

Maine Citizens Against Handgun Violence

Stop Handgun Violence (Massachusetts)

Northland Brady Chapter (Minnesota)

Million Mom March, Richmond, VA chapter

New Yorkers Against Gun Violence

North Carolinians Against Gun Violence

Ohio Coalition Against Gun Violence

Lance Orchid, National Organizing Director, Gun Violence Prevention

ProgressNow Colorado

Protect Minnesota

Maria Roach, New Organizing Institute, Gun Violence Prevention Senior Fellow

Virginia Center for Public Safety

Washington CeaseFire

Wisconsin Anti-Violence Educational Fund

Gun Control Australia praises these organisations that seek to protect American people from the pro-violence policies of that country’s shooting groups.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97677 Jan 21, 2013
What is the first thing you think of when you think "Duck"? Is it Donald or Daffy Duck, or the "Rubber Duckie" song from Sesame Street, or perhaps visiting a duck pond and feeding them bread? Ducks have been ingrained into our childhood memories yet not many people would consider having a duck as a pet. However, ducks are incredibly loyal, friendly and amusing animals to own.

Ducks are very social animals and unless you are able to dedicate all your daylight hours to entertaining your new friend, it is recommended to have two or more. If you raise ducklings they are likely to "imprint" on you and they will come to identify you as their mummy and themselves as humans. They will follow you around and rely on you to teach them what they need to know.

Ducks and ducklings are available for around $15-$20 each at pet shops or from breeders. You should never take a duck from the wild as they are not bred to be pets.


While ducks are hardy animals and are very easy to care for, there are a few things you need to know to keep your pets happy and healthy.

Housing

Ducks may be waterproof, but they do need some protection from the elements or they are prone to heat stroke or pneumonia. A small shed, large enclosed aviary or dog house are great pre-made options for shelter, or you can build your own.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97678 Jan 21, 2013
Ducks will eat almost anything they can get their beaks on. A healthy diet for a duck should be balanced and rich in nutrients and protein, much like a human diet. You now have a disposal system for all your dinner scraps. Ducks will graze throughout the day so if you have grass that they can roam on, you may find you won't have to mow anymore.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97679 Jan 21, 2013
Laying ducks need a diet higher in protein than drakes, so feeding the little lady mashed boiled eggs with the shells crushed up (their own eggs are fine, too), baked beans or meat scraps will keep her laying more frequently and her eggs will be better quality. Layer pellets or most wild bird mixes will stop her going hungry.

Ducklings also need high protein but are unable to digest meat or anything large, so cans of dog or cat food are a good option, or if you have a livestock or poultry supplier nearby, chicken starter or crumbles is a cheaper alternative. On cold days you may want to tempt your babies with some thick porridge made with water.

Drakes or non-laying ducks will eat table scraps and grass clippings, and for a well rounded diet add some scratch mix available from livestock suppliers and some pet stores, or wild bird mix which is available in most large supermarkets.

As mentioned previously, ducks will eat anything, but there are a few things you should keep them away from. Anything that is bad for humans is probably bad for ducks such as cake, chips and alcohol. Bread is a major culprit for reducing the life expectancy of ducks as it can swell up inside them and they may choke. Ducks also have trouble digesting processed foods and dairy so cheese and chocolate should especially be avoided.

If you want to treat your ducks a few good options are cherry tomatoes or chopped up tomato wedges, cracked corn, or the occasional piece of cake or a handful of chips if treated sparingly. Any kind of sweet fruit can be used as a treat as well if chopped up into beak sized pieces.
Brit Expat

Montpellier, France

#97680 Jan 21, 2013
boo wrote:
I miss my ducks. Whenever I have time to hanker after my past life in Suffolk, my garden and all its incumbents, it’s the motley crew of crossbreed ducks that immediately swim to mind. But this multicoloured flock of comedians, sometimes up to 80 strong, was often the scourge of my gardening life.
Ducks need water, and I can remember excavating our pond, planting up the banks with indigenous wildflowers and building a pontoon so our sons could lie on their tummies and watch the wild life that soon took up residence. Later we were entranced as a wild mallard and her eleven ducklings made their home among the lily pads. We watched them grow (like wildfire), disappear in autumn, and then to our horror, reappear the following spring with all their mates, and similar success in raising their offspring. The garden was soon awash with ducks that turned our exquisite garden pond into a duck-pond.
We fed them, witnessed their lurid love-lives, racing out with arms akimbo to rescue put-upon females courted by dozens of sex-mad lotharios (mallard drakes are the only birds with phalluses, all those innuendos are wasted on cockerels); every morning we woke bleary-eyed to their raucous dawn chorus, and raised their orphans – and I always seemed to have a duckling nestled in my jumper.
So, needless to say, wild ducks would not be my first choice as co-gardeners. The two main downsides are the trample factor – ducks have big feet – and the mess, especially around the pond. Lawns can be cleaned with a besom or a quick burst of a high-speed hose, pond banks can be re-enforced and vulnerable areas protected with fences and cloches. Be warned, though: my flock ate the compost from my raised beds, and virtually anything green and sappy was nibbled or trampled to the ground.
Domestic ducks are another matter entirely. It is possible to keep a small, controllable flock that will lay as many delicious eggs as a hen and won’t wreck your garden.
Hi Boo, Wonderfull amusing/factual posts. Thanks M8
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97681 Jan 21, 2013
It may seem obvious but water is incredibly important for ducks to survive. It is not necessary to have a pond for your ducks, but they do need a constant source of clean water to aid them in digestion. A bird waterer or feeder are options, or a cement bowl that the ducks cannot tip over, or even a bucket assuming the ducks are big enough to reach into it. Ducks need enough water to be able to cover their entire beak without touching the bottom, so they can clean our their nasal cavity which can become clogged with food otherwise.

If you choose to have a pond, ducks can be a great joy to watch in the water. If all you have space for is a plastic tub or a child's plastic sandpit, your duck will be happy regardless. If you have the space and the time to set up a proper duck pond, you need to ensure it is sustainable. Ducks are very messy and a standard pond pump is not suitable for keeping a duck pond clean. Duckweed and other fast spreading pond plants can help keep the water clean by breaking up the nutrients left in the water and making them easier for the pump to filter, but be warned that ducks will try to eat them. Fish would also do a great job at keeping the pond clean, but they're not likely to survive their first day in the water with curious and perpetually hungry ducks in the vicinity. You will probably find yourself emptying and refilling your pond at least once a month. Ducks are susceptible to some water borne diseases so keeping their water clean is imperative
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97682 Jan 21, 2013
Australia breeds 3 main domestic duck breeds. The most common of these is the Pekin. Pekins are all white with orange beaks and legs and have an upright stance. They are classified as a medium duck and an adult drake can weigh up to 5kg. Their lifespan is 9-12 years in captivity. Pekins are one of the more intelligent of their species and will prefer the company of humans to other ducks. They are incredibly friendly and loyal as are most ducks and are happy to live indoors or outdoors. Pekins are not proficient swimmers and prefer to forage and wander around, but won't pass up a good swim if given the opportunity. Pekins are also excellent guard "dogs" and will alert the family if there is any danger.

Khaki Campbells are also bred in Australia as a domestic duck, but are also farmed as laying ducks. Campbells are a small compact duck that can be timid until they get to know you. An adult drake can weigh up to 2kg and will live about 8 years. Campbells are excellent laying ducks, laying in excess of 300 eggs per year, but their breed does not have a good reputation for being broody, so if you are interested in breeding Campbells it is best to invest in an incubator. Campbell drakes have a striking colour scheme of pale mottled brown and grey over most of his body, a bright blue patch under his wings and a velvety green head and neck. The female duck is a mottled "khaki" brown and black. Both the drake and duck have rich brown eyes and their beaks and legs can range from grey to orange with black beak tips. Campbells are excellent swimmers and will happily spend all day dabbling in a puddle or chasing worms in the mud
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97683 Jan 21, 2013
The third breed of duck most commonly found as a pet in Australia is the Muscovy. This duck is large and not particularly attractive, weighing up to 8kg with an average wingspan of 2m they can be a little intimidating to look at. This coupled with their trademark red, blotchy naked faces means they are not one of the more popular breeds to keep, however they are fiercely loyal and gentle ducks that most closely resemble a pet dog. It is not uncommon for a Muscovy to meet it's owners at the fence with wagging tails and heads bobbing for a pat and a cuddle. These ducks do not have quacks, but rather have more of a quiet raspy hiss which is good for people with close neighbours. Muscovies are perching ducks and are comfortable being held, but this also means they are prone to short, low flights across the yard which your cat mat not appreciate. Due to the sheer weight of these ducks, there is little chance of them flying high enough to get out of your yard, so there is no need to clip their wings
GoGoBar

Hua Hin, Thailand

#97684 Jan 21, 2013
boo wrote:
Ducks will eat almost anything they can get their beaks on. A healthy diet for a duck should be balanced and rich in nutrients and protein, much like a human diet. You now have a disposal system for all your dinner scraps. Ducks will graze throughout the day so if you have grass that they can roam on, you may find you won't have to mow anymore.
How do you stop the ducks from flying away to better pasture after they have gorged themselves of scraps and forage.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97685 Jan 21, 2013
Ducks poo. A lot. It is important for the health and safety of you and your family that you have a way of containing their mess as it can be a sanitation issue and can also become very slippery on hard surfaces in the rain. As ducks do not have sphincter muscles it is not possible to litter train them, so the best option is to contain them in a part of the yard that unsupervised children can't access. If you choose to have your ducks inside there is a simple solution that has become very popular in the US- duck nappies.
If you are handy with a pair of scissors and a sewing machine you can try making your own using the pattern on this site.
Duck nappies mean you and your feathery friends can snuggle together inside on a winter night and watch NCIS without having to worry about poo.
Brit Expat

Montpellier, France

#97686 Jan 21, 2013
Not to mention the 60,000 people killed by "friendly fire" in the USless in the past 2 years. Hello Syria, its not so bad!
boo

Chernogorsk, Russia

#97687 Jan 21, 2013
Because ducks are not a common pet they come under the livestock category in your councils restrictions. Most councils will allow fowl if they are contained properly, faecal matter is removed often and disposed of safely (or watered into your grass as it is excellent fertiliser) and they do not make too much noise. Contact your local council if you are unsure. Remember, too, that ducklings do grow into ducks and that cute yellow fluffy thing will be almost fully grown in the next 8 weeks. Like any pet it is a big responsibility, but unlike dogs and cats ducks will usually be euthanased if picked up by the pound. Some pounds -blacktown I know is one- will hold ducks for short times so perhaps even consider adopting an older duck that is less work than a duckling and you know exactly what you are getting.
Dr Freud

Bethnal Green, UK

#97688 Jan 21, 2013
Brit Expat wrote:
<quoted text>
Excellent! I love it!
There was a young girl from the Azores
Who's "thing! was all covered in sores
And dogs ate green meat as she walked down the street
Which hung in festoons from her draws.
There was once a Brit Expat,
Who the more he spoke it was as shat,
His thinking so reeked,
That his listeners had to seek,
Relieve with several pints of English Crag Rat (*)
* www.jenningsbrewery.co.uk
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97691 Jan 21, 2013
GoGoBar wrote:
<quoted text>
How do you stop the ducks from flying away to better pasture after they have gorged themselves of scraps and forage.
Clip their wings

With either wing, use sharp scissors or tin cutters to do the job. You need only to clip one to keep the bird grounded.

To obtain a complete trim as in figure 3, cut each shaft of the 10 primary feathers just under the primary coverts. Leave intact the secondary feathers to maintain a natural appearance and/or to preserve the beauty of ducks with colored speculums. Take your time, and be neat about it.

Figure 2 exhibits an optional partial trim that will still keep the bird grounded. This trim leaves the two outer primaries intact to maintain two even points while the bird has both wings closed.

If you wish to keep your birds from flight, you only need to clip once a year. Observe your bird's molt each summer, as waterfowl drop all their flight feathers in early to mid summer; growing a new set by late summer through early fall. Pen your birds prior to the completion of new growth so they don't fly while attempting to catch them. Avoid clipping too soon, as there is blood within the casing of the feather shaft closest to the wing. If not ready to trim, the feather shaft will resemble the ink tube of a ball point pen.

Since: Dec 10

Brisbane, Australia

#97692 Jan 21, 2013
For Pete’s sake, 85% of people who either are or live with NRA members support background checks.

Seriously, let’s do this! The president said Wednesday Congress needs to move quickly. Obama named universal background check legislation as the first bill.

Do eeeeet, do eeeet now.....get them suckers.
Brit Expat

Montpellier, France

#97695 Jan 21, 2013
Dr Freud wrote:
<quoted text>
There was once a Brit Expat,
Who the more he spoke it was as shat,
His thinking so reeked,
That his listeners had to seek,
Relieve with several pints of English Crag Rat (*)
* www.jenningsbrewery.co.uk
Hi M8. I recommend the Marlow Brewery if you get down that way.Real Ale.

Nothing personal.

But! There was a young man from Kent

Who's tool was exeedingly bent

to save himself trouble. he put it in double

and instead of coming he went.

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