Franken Bets On 'DREAM Act' In Immigr...

Franken Bets On 'DREAM Act' In Immigration Bill

There are 95 comments on the CBS Local story from Apr 2, 2013, titled Franken Bets On 'DREAM Act' In Immigration Bill. In it, CBS Local reports that:

Minnesota Sen. Al Franken anticipates the federal immigration overhaul will contain the so-called DREAM Act that's geared toward speeding citizenship for young illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at CBS Local.

“The "entitled" =communist.”

Since: May 10

MY MONEY, come take it.

#45 Apr 6, 2013
tomin cali wrote:
<quoted text>
after all the reading of such garbage i remembered it comes from those prison computers. time to take them out of prisons and get you folks off line.
seems la raza is teaching you while you're locked up
That's called "writ room" time.

“I know where you are,”

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#46 Apr 8, 2013
walton32 wrote:
"A good illegal alien is a dead illegal alien." No crime, no filth, no anchor babies. Everything they
touch turns to crap. We need an aggressive but humane program to deport one and all.
Then I suppose you'll pick the cabbage in 110+ degree heat for 14 hours a day, huh?

Brilliant!!!
spud

Bangor, PA

#47 Apr 8, 2013
Mayela wrote:
Opinion: Stop the public tantrum against DREAMers
In a recent Op-Ed,“DREAMers are pushing their luck,” conservative columnist Ruben Navarrette criticizes DREAM Act youth.“I know just what a lot of those so-called DREAMers deserve to get for Christmas,” he writes,“a scolding.” Navarrette goes on to give them one, calling them “spoiled brats” who are “drunk on entitlement.”
It is beyond strange that Navarrette would take aim at the most powerless and vulnerable of all the players in the immigration debate. Not only does Navarrette object to the DREAMers’ civic engagement, he warns of a backlash against their “public tantrums.” Sadly, the only “public tantrum” on display is Navarrette’s – and it’s not pretty.
Navarrette complains that the DREAMers “insist that they’re entitled to better treatment than run-of-the-mill immigrants.” Actually, the DREAMers are entitled to better treatment. Unlike most of the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S., they did not choose to enter the country illegally; they were brought as children by their parents. For this reason, fairness and compassion dictate that these young people be treated differently.
The DREAMers’ activism offends Navarrette.“They don caps and gowns and disrupt committee hearings and occupy the offices of members of Congress,” he writes.“They dare the police to arrest them, and then act surprised when it happens.” Yet peaceful civil disobedience is one of the hallmarks of a healthy democracy. It took courage for the DREAMers to out themselves as undocumented, risking deportation in pursuit of their cause. This past summer, the growing protests and increased visibility of the DREAMers led to the Obama administration’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which grants temporary relief from deportation to qualified young people. That the DREAMers were able to bring about such an important policy shift is as remarkable as it is commendable. And consider that last year, for the first time in history, an undocumented immigrant, Benita Velez, addressed the Democratic National Convention.
Navarrette also objects to the DREAMers seeking U.S. citizenship. Holding this view, he must be feeling a bit lonely. The Pew Center reports that 91 percent of Hispanics support a path to citizenship for undocumented young people. Polling consistently shows that a majority of Americans feel the same way. Would Navarrette prefer that undocumented youth remain a permanent underclass, living in the shadows among us?
Navarette then makes the claim that the DREAMers are provoking a backlash.“While they (DREAMers) probably don’t realize it,” he writes,“their public tantrums are turning people against them and hurting the chances for a broader immigration reform package.” As proof, he cites one source – one!– who happens to be his friend and business partner. This one source shares Navarrette’s opinion that the DREAMers are making too many demands. But just because Navarrette has one like-minded friend doesn’t mean there is any movement against the DREAMers and immigration reform.
In fact, the opposite is true. In the aftermath of the 2012 election, leading conservative voices from TV host Sean Hannity to Speaker of the House John Boehner are now leaning towards supporting a pathway to citizenship for the undocumented.
Navarrette’s irritation at the DREAMers’“tantrums” is ironic considering he has had some choice tantrums of his own. This is a man who describes a “nose-to-nose shouting match” with Cesar Chavez in his book (page 227). He has publicly feuded with Latina icon Dolores Huerta
http://nbclatino.com/2013/01/03/opinion-why-t...
Ruben Navar
rette is far from a conservative. He's generally one of the biggest apologists for illegal aliens. What he says about Dreamers is true. They do have an attitude of entitlement. And lets be honest, how many Latino studies graduates does this country really need?

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#48 Apr 8, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
Then I suppose you'll pick the cabbage in 110+ degree heat for 14 hours a day, huh?
Brilliant!!!
where do you get these ideas? osha is all over farmers here making sure all have shade stations and plenty of cool water.you can get used to the heat.

“I know where you are,”

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#49 Apr 8, 2013
tomin cali wrote:
<quoted text>
where do you get these ideas? osha is all over farmers here making sure all have shade stations and plenty of cool water.you can get used to the heat.
Lol...shade stations...so tell me how does all the crop get picked when all of your migrant farm workers are relaxing in the shade?

Take a look at what Georgia went through years ago when they decided to replace migrant farm workers with parolees and "local" labor.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#51 Apr 8, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
Lol...shade stations...so tell me how does all the crop get picked when all of your migrant farm workers are relaxing in the shade?
Take a look at what Georgia went through years ago when they decided to replace migrant farm workers with parolees and "local" labor.
i am in the central valley of ca,it does sometime get up to 117 or more. after a few farm workers died do to being hung over and not drinking enough water osha stepped in,farm workers have more protection that construction workers here,then again we are smart enough to take care of our own needs knowing water saves lives.

now i know there are some weak folks who think illegal aliens are the only folks working out doors do to they cannot cut it yet there are millions of us in my state alone as in all other states.
Anonymous

Payson, AZ

#53 Apr 8, 2013
During WW2 we managed to harvest the crops with 2 million in uniform and off the farms. 500K guest workers assisted in the South West. Later President
Eisenhower initiated Operation Wetback to remove
who "lingered". Better to work then to have America
polluted with thousands of fast-breeding biological
and cultural disasters, the Hispanics.

“I know where you are,”

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#54 Apr 8, 2013
tomin cali wrote:
<quoted text>
i am in the central valley of ca,it does sometime get up to 117 or more. after a few farm workers died do to being hung over and not drinking enough water osha stepped in,farm workers have more protection that construction workers here,then again we are smart enough to take care of our own needs knowing water saves lives.
now i know there are some weak folks who think illegal aliens are the only folks working out doors do to they cannot cut it yet there are millions of us in my state alone as in all other states.
The problem or issue is, what American would do this type of work for that pay?

The answer is nobody. Even though "lots" of folks would say on this forum that they'd have no problem doing this type of work - this isn't farming. Migrant farmworkers "follow the crop." They raise their families in deplorable conditions - working 12-14 hours a day in all sorts of weather - normally hot and humid. They perform this labor effortlessly, day in and day out. Now, before you start categorizing me, let me say that I'm not for or against immigrant farm labor. I just don't see any Americans wanting this type of work. My proof is the 3.1 million job surplus in the US already - our jobless population has gotten too selective. Even the parolees in Georgia quit - it is that hard.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#55 Apr 8, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
The problem or issue is, what American would do this type of work for that pay?
The answer is nobody. Even though "lots" of folks would say on this forum that they'd have no problem doing this type of work - this isn't farming. Migrant farmworkers "follow the crop." They raise their families in deplorable conditions - working 12-14 hours a day in all sorts of weather - normally hot and humid. They perform this labor effortlessly, day in and day out. Now, before you start categorizing me, let me say that I'm not for or against immigrant farm labor. I just don't see any Americans wanting this type of work. My proof is the 3.1 million job surplus in the US already - our jobless population has gotten too selective. Even the parolees in Georgia quit - it is that hard.
the illegal alien farm workers in ca are no longer migrants,they will not even migrate 14 miles to the next town. they found a way to life off others right where they are,yet reap all the handouts given to migrant farm wworkers.

“I know where you are,”

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#56 Apr 8, 2013
tomin cali wrote:
<quoted text>
the illegal alien farm workers in ca are no longer migrants,they will not even migrate 14 miles to the next town. they found a way to life off others right where they are,yet reap all the handouts given to migrant farm wworkers.
I was stationed for a bit in Lemoore, CA. They were there when I was there back in the 70's.

This is nothing new.

I still wouldn't want their jobs - and honestly don't know anybody that would.

“Taste great in milk!”

Since: Aug 08

.

#57 Apr 8, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
Then I suppose you'll pick the cabbage in 110+ degree heat for 14 hours a day, huh?
Brilliant!!!
Cabbage is a cold weather crop.
Besides they have machines that can do that.

“I know where you are,”

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#58 Apr 8, 2013
Commander Bunny wrote:
<quoted text>Cabbage is a cold weather crop.
Besides they have machines that can do that.
You're thinking of corn, not cabbage.

The have machines indeed - they carry the crates.

http://images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_y...

“I know where you are,”

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#59 Apr 8, 2013
Commander Bunny wrote:
<quoted text>Cabbage is a cold weather crop.
Besides they have machines that can do that.
Cold crop may it be, but they harvested it outside of Fresno year round.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#60 Apr 8, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
I was stationed for a bit in Lemoore, CA. They were there when I was there back in the 70's.
This is nothing new.
I still wouldn't want their jobs - and honestly don't know anybody that would.
ever notice how fresno farmers say labor shortage then the news on the same station says unemployment rate in kerman mendota and fireball almost 40%,migrant workers won't migrate.

or showing an abandoned field saying crops rotting and right across the street guys picking.ha!think all viewers have short term memory loss

“I know where you are,”

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#61 Apr 9, 2013
tomin cali wrote:
<quoted text>
ever notice how fresno farmers say labor shortage then the news on the same station says unemployment rate in kerman mendota and fireball almost 40%,migrant workers won't migrate.
or showing an abandoned field saying crops rotting and right across the street guys picking.ha!think all viewers have short term memory loss
Yeah, we used to hit "rolling heads" all the time outside of Modesto with our truck. The farmers in Georgia were a little bit more patient - that is until the parolee experiment failed. The hilarious thing is that most Americans wouldn't want this type of work - oh, they all complain about giving Jose this and giving Jose that - but the bottom line is, no one wants to work the fields - not the way migrant workers do.

I enjoy my relatively low-priced and fresh fruits and veggies just the way they are, thank you. Simply eliminating the field worker is not a solution, IMO.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#62 Apr 9, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah, we used to hit "rolling heads" all the time outside of Modesto with our truck. The farmers in Georgia were a little bit more patient - that is until the parolee experiment failed. The hilarious thing is that most Americans wouldn't want this type of work - oh, they all complain about giving Jose this and giving Jose that - but the bottom line is, no one wants to work the fields - not the way migrant workers do.
I enjoy my relatively low-priced and fresh fruits and veggies just the way they are, thank you. Simply eliminating the field worker is not a solution, IMO.
funny thing,i live in the valley where most everything i eat is grown,yet cannot find any local grown anything in stores it is either farmers markets buy imports at the store,and what we get at the stores at one time was thrown away as culls.

“I know where you are,”

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#63 Apr 9, 2013
tomin cali wrote:
<quoted text>
funny thing,i live in the valley where most everything i eat is grown,yet cannot find any local grown anything in stores it is either farmers markets buy imports at the store,and what we get at the stores at one time was thrown away as culls.
That's Cali for you - they do everything assbackards there.
spud

Bangor, PA

#64 Apr 9, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
The problem or issue is, what American would do this type of work for that pay?
The "for that pay" part is the whole problem. When illegal aliens flooded our labor market, they drove wages down. This is good for the slavers who employ them but it isn't good for anyone else. It isn't even good for the consumer considering the unemployment it causes and the tax burden that is put on all Americans to supply the slave labor with education, healthcare, housing, food, childcare etc. etc. There would be plenty of Americans willing to do this type of hard work if they were paid a living wage.

“I know where you are,”

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#65 Apr 9, 2013
spud wrote:
<quoted text>The "for that pay" part is the whole problem. When illegal aliens flooded our labor market, they drove wages down. This is good for the slavers who employ them but it isn't good for anyone else. It isn't even good for the consumer considering the unemployment it causes and the tax burden that is put on all Americans to supply the slave labor with education, healthcare, housing, food, childcare etc. etc. There would be plenty of Americans willing to do this type of hard work if they were paid a living wage.
So, if needed, you'd be first in line for those jobs, same wages, same working conditions? The state of Georgia tried this already.

**********
Georgia's tough anti-illegal-immigrant law drove a sizable fraction of the migrant labor pool out of the state, and as a result, "millions of dollars' worth of blueberries, onions, melons and other crops [are] unharvested and rotting in the fields." The jobs the migrants did paid an average of $8/hour, without benefits, a wage that is so low that the state's probationed prisoners have turned it down. Guest-writing in the Atlantic's economics section, Adam Ozimek doesn't believe that the farms would be viable if they paid wages that legal American workers would take: "it's quite possible that the wages required to get workers to do the job are so high that it's no longer profitable for farmers to plant the crops in the first place."
**********

Tell you what, I'd much rather pay for free education, healthcare, housing, food, childcare etc. etc. to people who worked to put food on my table rather than giving it for free to the idiot who doesn't work and drives his Escalade around all day.
Con Todo

Charlottesville, VA

#66 Apr 9, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
Then I suppose you'll pick the cabbage in 110+ degree heat for 14 hours a day, huh?
Brilliant!!!
As long as it's a dry heat, no problema.

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