Crackdown turns Chipotle boss into immigration-reform advocate

Full story: Denver Post 86
A government crackdown that found Chipotle Mexican Grill had hired hundreds of undocumented workers has turned Monty Moran, the burrito chain's co-leader, into an unlikely champion of immigration overhaul. Full Story
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R U Kidding Me

Omaha, NE

#1 Dec 20, 2011
Amazing, I'm an employer and I know the laws. Chipolte did, however knowingly broke them. There's not excuse for their actions!
USA

United States

#2 Dec 20, 2011
R U Kidding Me wrote:
Amazing, I'm an employer and I know the laws. Chipolte did, however knowingly broke them. There's not excuse for their actions!
he preferred to hire real hardworking employees he is not allowed that much ? Recent studies released by the Georgia Restaurant Association and the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association paint a dark picture for the impact of HB 87.
According to Karen Bremer, the Executive Director for the Georgia Restaurant Association, workers who held jobs as dishwashers, line cooks, or janitors in restaurants are fleeing the state in droves costing restaurant owners thousands of dollars in lost sales.
"When asked about current labor availability, three quarters of the restaurants surveyed are experiencing a labor shortage," said Bremer. "Workers are scared to come to Georgia."
Bremer said despite Georgia's 10 percent unemployment rate owners report Georgians are not stepping up to fill the positions.
It is a similar situation, according to Charles Hall, with the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.
"Food in America is a national security issue," Hall said. "If we can't solve the immigration problem in the U.S. we may be dependant on food just like we are on foreign oil."
According to their study, the effects on Georgia's agricultural economy have been devastating.
Hall said $300 million is the estimated loss in harvested crops statewide,$1 billion dollars in total economic impact on Georgia's economy and untold millions in the losses to the economies of small towns and farmers dependent on immigrant labor.
Hall said the labor shortage is so prolific, many farmers, are re-thinking how they will farm next year.
USA

United States

#3 Dec 20, 2011
R U Kidding Me

Omaha, NE

#4 Dec 20, 2011
Laws are laws, all of them!
USA

United States

#5 Dec 20, 2011
R U Kidding Me wrote:
Laws are laws, all of them!
yeh but some are outdated
Socialist State

United States

#6 Dec 20, 2011
USA wrote:
<quoted text> he preferred to hire real hardworking employees he is not allowed that much ? Recent studies released by the Georgia Restaurant Association and the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association paint a dark picture for the impact of HB 87.
According to Karen Bremer, the Executive Director for the Georgia Restaurant Association, workers who held jobs as dishwashers, line cooks, or janitors in restaurants are fleeing the state in droves costing restaurant owners thousands of dollars in lost sales.
"When asked about current labor availability, three quarters of the restaurants surveyed are experiencing a labor shortage," said Bremer. "Workers are scared to come to Georgia."
Bremer said despite Georgia's 10 percent unemployment rate owners report Georgians are not stepping up to fill the positions.
It is a similar situation, according to Charles Hall, with the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.
"Food in America is a national security issue," Hall said. "If we can't solve the immigration problem in the U.S. we may be dependant on food just like we are on foreign oil."
According to their study, the effects on Georgia's agricultural economy have been devastating.
Hall said $300 million is the estimated loss in harvested crops statewide,$1 billion dollars in total economic impact on Georgia's economy and untold millions in the losses to the economies of small towns and farmers dependent on immigrant labor.
Hall said the labor shortage is so prolific, many farmers, are re-thinking how they will farm next year.
So you advacate people breaking the law then right. I mean hell with all the people out of work and with no money then I guess it's ok to rob a bank right.
Socialist State

United States

#7 Dec 20, 2011
USA wrote:
<quoted text> yeh but some are outdated
Well until they are changed, it's still breaking the law. Do you some issue with understanding that?
American Proud

Kansas City, MO

#8 Dec 20, 2011
Any company having been found to knowingly hire illegals should get a minimum of 10 years IRS complete audits!

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#9 Dec 20, 2011
USA wrote:
<quoted text> he preferred to hire real hardworking employees he is not allowed that much ? Recent studies released by the Georgia Restaurant Association and the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association paint a dark picture for the impact of HB 87.
According to Karen Bremer, the Executive Director for the Georgia Restaurant Association, workers who held jobs as dishwashers, line cooks, or janitors in restaurants are fleeing the state in droves costing restaurant owners thousands of dollars in lost sales.
"When asked about current labor availability, three quarters of the restaurants surveyed are experiencing a labor shortage," said Bremer. "Workers are scared to come to Georgia."
Bremer said despite Georgia's 10 percent unemployment rate owners report Georgians are not stepping up to fill the positions.
It is a similar situation, according to Charles Hall, with the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.
"Food in America is a national security issue," Hall said. "If we can't solve the immigration problem in the U.S. we may be dependant on food just like we are on foreign oil."
According to their study, the effects on Georgia's agricultural economy have been devastating.
Hall said $300 million is the estimated loss in harvested crops statewide,$1 billion dollars in total economic impact on Georgia's economy and untold millions in the losses to the economies of small towns and farmers dependent on immigrant labor.
Hall said the labor shortage is so prolific, many farmers, are re-thinking how they will farm next year.
Here is an idea,make the people that can,but won't work on welfare fill the jobs instead of laying around all day getting buzzed and knocking out babies.OH,I'm sorry,they don't have to work,they are entitled to live off of the taxpayers for generation after generation. Round up the illegals,ship them home,make the able people living on the system do the jobs that the illegals do now. See how easy it is to solve the problem?

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#10 Dec 20, 2011
American Proud wrote:
Any company having been found to knowingly hire illegals should get a minimum of 10 years IRS complete audits!
And the CEO locked up for a few years.
Dee Dee Dee

Emmaus, PA

#11 Dec 20, 2011
USA wrote:
<quoted text> he preferred to hire real hardworking employees he is not allowed that much ? Recent studies released by the Georgia Restaurant Association and the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association paint a dark picture for the impact of HB 87.
According to Karen Bremer, the Executive Director for the Georgia Restaurant Association, workers who held jobs as dishwashers, line cooks, or janitors in restaurants are fleeing the state in droves costing restaurant owners thousands of dollars in lost sales.
"When asked about current labor availability, three quarters of the restaurants surveyed are experiencing a labor shortage," said Bremer. "Workers are scared to come to Georgia."
Bremer said despite Georgia's 10 percent unemployment rate owners report Georgians are not stepping up to fill the positions.
It is a similar situation, according to Charles Hall, with the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.
"Food in America is a national security issue," Hall said. "If we can't solve the immigration problem in the U.S. we may be dependant on food just like we are on foreign oil."
According to their study, the effects on Georgia's agricultural economy have been devastating.
Hall said $300 million is the estimated loss in harvested crops statewide,$1 billion dollars in total economic impact on Georgia's economy and untold millions in the losses to the economies of small towns and farmers dependent on immigrant labor.
Hall said the labor shortage is so prolific, many farmers, are re-thinking how they will farm next year.
The opinions of the criminals that exploit illegal aliens does not matter. The fact that unemployment and crime go down when immigration laws are enforced and the fact that it is both illegal and imorral to exploit illegal aliens is what matters.
USA

United States

#12 Dec 20, 2011
Socialist State wrote:
<quoted text>So you advacate people breaking the law then right. I mean hell with all the people out of work and with no money then I guess it's ok to rob a bank right.
Farmer Scott Allgood, front, of Allgood, Ala., listens during a meeting of farmers and state officials to discuss the impact of the Alabama Immigration law on their livelihoods in Oneonta, Ala.
Published: October 24, 2011
by Debbie Elliott
Alabama farmers are facing a labor crisis because of the state's new immigration law as both legal and undocumented migrant workers have fled the state since the strict new rules went into effect last month.
So far, piecemeal efforts to match the unemployed or work release inmates to farm jobs are not panning out, and farmers are asking state lawmakers to do something before the spring planting season.
Farmer Guiseppe Peturis has a small operation — growing mostly vegetables on his family's 20-acre farm in Belforest, Ala.— and selling them on the corner in front of his house. His retail business has suffered since he appeared on the local news saying Alabamians don't want to do hard farm work.
He says he's a Republican, but is no fan of Republican Gov. Robert Bentley's plan to get jobs for out-of-work Alabamians by passing the nation's toughest immigration law. Among other things, it calls for police to detain suspects if there's reasonable suspicion they are in the country illegally.
Peturis says he's tried to hire through the state unemployment office before, but didn't have much success.
"Two of them left in 30 minutes; didn't even tell us they [were] going to leave," Peturis says. "One worked an hour and says it was too hard on his back."
The Impending Planting Season
In Baldwin County on the Gulf Coast, strawberry planting season is just a few weeks away. Farmers are wondering if they'll have the crews to get the plants in the ground.
"We need help doing it and we need help that's going to come back every day," says Mark Krupinski, whose family farms about 900 acres in Foley, Alabama. He says the work is hard, and when local people ask him about a job, they want to drive tractors, not labor in the fields.
"That isn't the kind of job most of us want to do," he says. "I don't blame them for not wanting to do [it], but somebody's got to do it if we're going to keep eating for the price that we are eating at."
Alabama Agriculture Commissioner John McMillian says there's no doubt the immigration law has left farmers in a lurch. He says they're concerned about where the labor is going to come from since legal immigrants are leaving along with the illegal ones.
By the time the prime harvesting season rolls around in late spring and early summer, McMillian says farmers will need thousands of workers, and he's not sure the unemployed can fill the demand.
USA

United States

#13 Dec 20, 2011
Dee Dee Dee wrote:
<quoted text>
The opinions of the criminals that exploit illegal aliens does not matter. The fact that unemployment and crime go down when immigration laws are enforced and the fact that it is both illegal and imorral to exploit illegal aliens is what matters.
OUR VIEW: Analysis shows a steep drop in the state's unemployment rate isn't because of Alabama's overreaching immigration law Birmingham News editorial board 12/01/2011 5:44 AM Well, not so fast.

Alabama and two other states, Michigan and Minnesota, each saw a half-percent drop in their unemployment rates in October, the largest in the nation. Neither Michigan nor Minnesota have draconian immigration laws in place.

State Sen. Bryan Taylor, R-Prattville, said three of the five states with the steepest unemployment rate drops in October have passed tough immigration laws. "It's hard to draw a causal relationship conclusively, but it's certainly plausible," he said.

It is true that South Carolina and Utah, which did pass overreaching immigration laws, also had significant drops in unemployment, but their laws aren't nearly as tough as Alabama's.

But wait. Georgia and Arizona didn't make the top 12 states with significant drops in unemployment rates, and they have laws like South Carolina and Utah. Vermont did make the top 12. So did Pennsylvania. And Idaho. And Maryland. And none of those has Alabama-style immigration laws.

Something else must be going on, and the analysts say, yes, indeed, there is:

People are dropping off unemployment rolls because they've become discouraged by not being able to find a job and have stopped looking, according to an analysis by Arise Citizens' Policy Project. Alabama's labor force shrank by more than 6,000 workers in October, and the labor force has been shrinking since June. Economists say a shrinking labor force makes it easier for a state to post an unemployment rate decline, even if job growth is small.

While Alabama created fewer than 10,000 jobs in October, many of those were seasonal jobs and about half were state and local government jobs. Government jobs can't be held by undocumented workers, so those were not jobs being filled by Alabamians because undocumented workers were leaving the state.

The job sectors that do use immigrant workers -- restaurants, hotels, construction and manufacturing -- lost jobs in October. If undocumented workers are vacating those jobs, Alabama workers aren't rushing to fill them. Indeed, this week, the Associated General Contractors, based in Arlington, Va., said Alabama having the second-highest number of construction jobs lost from September to October -- 3.2 percent or 2,700 jobs -- is related to construction crews leaving the state in the wake of the immigration law.
http://mobile.al.com/advbirm/pm_29183/content...
Socialist State

United States

#14 Dec 20, 2011
USA wrote:
<quoted text>Farmer Scott Allgood, front, of Allgood, Ala., listens during a meeting of farmers and state officials to discuss the impact of the Alabama Immigration law on their livelihoods in Oneonta, Ala.
Published: October 24, 2011
by Debbie Elliott
Alabama farmers are facing a labor crisis because of the state's new immigration law as both legal and undocumented migrant workers have fled the state since the strict new rules went into effect last month.
So far, piecemeal efforts to match the unemployed or work release inmates to farm jobs are not panning out, and farmers are asking state lawmakers to do something before the spring planting season.
Farmer Guiseppe Peturis has a small operation — growing mostly vegetables on his family's 20-acre farm in Belforest, Ala.— and selling them on the corner in front of his house. His retail business has suffered since he appeared on the local news saying Alabamians don't want to do hard farm work.
He says he's a Republican, but is no fan of Republican Gov. Robert Bentley's plan to get jobs for out-of-work Alabamians by passing the nation's toughest immigration law. Among other things, it calls for police to detain suspects if there's reasonable suspicion they are in the country illegally.
Peturis says he's tried to hire through the state unemployment office before, but didn't have much success.
"Two of them left in 30 minutes; didn't even tell us they [were] going to leave," Peturis says. "One worked an hour and says it was too hard on his back."
The Impending Planting Season
In Baldwin County on the Gulf Coast, strawberry planting season is just a few weeks away. Farmers are wondering if they'll have the crews to get the plants in the ground.
"We need help doing it and we need help that's going to come back every day," says Mark Krupinski, whose family farms about 900 acres in Foley, Alabama. He says the work is hard, and when local people ask him about a job, they want to drive tractors, not labor in the fields.
"That isn't the kind of job most of us want to do," he says. "I don't blame them for not wanting to do [it], but somebody's got to do it if we're going to keep eating for the price that we are eating at."
Alabama Agriculture Commissioner John McMillian says there's no doubt the immigration law has left farmers in a lurch. He says they're concerned about where the labor is going to come from since legal immigrants are leaving along with the illegal ones.
By the time the prime harvesting season rolls around in late spring and early summer, McMillian says farmers will need thousands of workers, and he's not sure the unemployed can fill the demand.
Stop Spaming and deflecting from the point. You seem great at that. Bottom line until the law is changed it is illgeal to hire illegals period. What is it again about that law that you just don't understand? This is a nation of laws and people can't go around and decide what laws to obey and what laws not to obey. I will bet that you smoke pot right?
USA

United States

#15 Dec 20, 2011
Dee Dee Dee wrote:
<quoted text>
The opinions of the criminals that exploit illegal aliens does not matter. The fact that unemployment and crime go down when immigration laws are enforced and the fact that it is both illegal and imorral to exploit illegal aliens is what matters.
bzzzt another lie ! crime ?:
   He claimed to the three judge panel that “illegal aliens” make up a substantial portion of the state’s prison population, thus causing huge state expenditures. As evidence, he used an affidavit saying that “182 state prison inmates are currently subject to deportation based on holds placed by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.” That is 182 inmates out of more than 31,000 total Alabama state prison inmates. For Alabama residents who are capable of dividing 182 by 31,000 that amounts to 0.6% of the total prison population.

   Is 0.6% of the Alabama prison inmate population a “substantial portion” of the state’s prison inmates?

   Strange also claims that “many of these people are taking jobs away from United States citizens and authorized aliens who desperately want to work in these hard economic times: while the unemployment rate in Alabama stands at 10%, approximately 4% of Alabama‘s workforce consists of illegal aliens.”

   Two more lies. He does not provide any proof that Americans are flooding to replace illegal alien workers who are leaving their jobs and homes out of fear. In fact, the truth is that crops are rotting in the fields because there are few workers applying for empty jobs. So desperate are Alabama farmers for workers that the Governor is talking about sending state prison inmates to the fields to harvest crops. The state of Georgia tried this and flopped — the work is “too hard” for prisoners.

   Where are all the “desperate” American workers?
Dee Dee Dee

Emmaus, PA

#16 Dec 20, 2011
Spam Spam Spam the same opinion pieces being posted on every thread. If you have no facts to bolster your opinion that illegal immigration and the exploitation of illegal and legal workers by greedy corporations is good for the United States then please post the facts.
Otherwise you are just wasting bandwidth.
USA

United States

#17 Dec 20, 2011
Dee Dee Dee wrote:
Spam Spam Spam the same opinion pieces being posted on every thread. If you have no facts to bolster your opinion that illegal immigration and the exploitation of illegal and legal workers by greedy corporations is good for the United States then please post the facts.
Otherwise you are just wasting bandwidth.
Rather than listening to an opposing view and saying,“I understand what you are saying, but I disagree with you.”, too many people say “you’re wrong” or “I can’t take you seriously” or they resort to name calling and insults. That’s one thing that causes serious conversations to break down. And without serious conversations between serious adults, it is really hard to make progress.
Socialist State

United States

#18 Dec 20, 2011
USA wrote:
<quoted text> Rather than listening to an opposing view and saying,“I understand what you are saying, but I disagree with you.”, too many people say “you’re wrong” or “I can’t take you seriously” or they resort to name calling and insults. That’s one thing that causes serious conversations to break down. And without serious conversations between serious adults, it is really hard to make progress.
Bottom line is stick to the topic of the article. You went on farming and the even the oerson in the article was talking about hiring legal workers, so again why is it so hard for you to grasp that illegals shouldn't be here in this country and companies shouldn't be hiring them. Seems to me you keep danceing around that same question.
American Proud

Kansas City, MO

#19 Dec 20, 2011
"Ignorance of the law isn't an excuse for breaking one or more!"
American Proud

Omaha, NE

#20 Dec 20, 2011
Before you start a business, you hire a corporate attorney who's versed in the laws, as well as a good CPA to keep your company in compliance! At some point you'll need both, it should be from the get-go!

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