Senators Reach Agreement On Overhauling Immigration

Jan 28, 2013 Full story: National Public Radio 584

A bipartisan group of leading senators has reached agreement on the principles of sweeping legislation to rewrite the nation's immigration laws.

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Eric Gustafson

Newport News, VA

#601 Feb 28, 2013
In 1607, after illegally breaking from the Church of England, the Separatists settled in the Netherlands, Due to economic difficulties, as well as fears that they would lose their English language and heritage, they began to make plans to settle in the New World. Their intended destination was a region near the Hudson River.

Squanto taught the Pilgrims how to plant corn, which became an important crop, as well as where to fish and hunt beaver. In the fall of 1621, the Pilgrims famously shared a harvest feast with the Pokanokets; the meal is now considered the basis for the Thanksgiving holiday.

The Massachusetts and Narragansetts, were not so well disposed towards European settlers, and Massasoit's alliance with the Pilgrims disrupted relations among Native American peoples in the region. Over the next decades, relations between settlers and Native Americans deteriorated as the former group occupied more and more land.

In 1675, Bradford's predictions came true, in the form of King Philip's War.(Philip was the English name of Metacomet, the son of Massasoit and leader of the Pokanokets since the early 1660s.) That conflict left some 5,000 inhabitants of New England dead, three quarters of those Native Americans.
Chicopee wrote:
<quoted text>
Keep quoting your revisionist history bullshit.
There is no archeological evidence of cannibalism in Jamestown. There was one story about one guy who went insane and supposedly ate his wife, a story that was added to and embellished. It's your mind. If you want to polute it with BS and swallow it as fact, that's your choice.
The Wampanoag Indians did help the Pilgrims. They had lost up to eighty percent of their population to the plague, and saw in the Pilgrims the opportunity to form a treaty, largely in order to protect themselves from the Narragansett tribe.
The natives of this land didn't all live in peace and unity. Far from it. Anglos were known to be here on the east coast as early as the year 1002 and there are many instances of anglos and natives banding together against common enemies. There is also ample evidence of eastern tribes adapting to the ways of anglos...but all of this is irrelevant today.
To the victor goes the spoils. That reality is just as true for the Natives of America as it is for the natives of nearly every modern nation on earth, including many of the native tribes "absorbed" by the Aztecs and Incas. Deal with it.
Eric Gustafson

Newport News, VA

#602 Feb 28, 2013
When dearth and disease swept through Jamestown, reducing its population perhaps by 80 percent in the catastrophic Starving Time of 160910, some individuals had turned to cannibalism out of hunger. As Percy and other survivors told it, sporadic cannibalism was a manifestation of a partial breakdown in civilized society in the face of inescapable disaster:

A worlde of miseries ensewed as the Sequell will expresse unto yow, in so mutche thatt some to satisfye their hunger have robbed the store for the which I Caused them to be executed. Then haveinge fedd upon our horses and other beastes as longe as they Lasted, we weare gladd to make shifte with vermin as doggs Catts, Ratts and myce all was fishe thatt Came to Nett to satisfye Crewell hunger, as to eate Bootes shoes or any other leather some Colde come by. And those beinge Spente and devoured some weare inforced to searche the woodes and to feede upon Serpentts and snakes and to digge the earthe for wylde and unknowne Rootes, where many of our men weare Cutt of and slayne by the Salvages. And now famin beginneinge to Looke gastely and pale in every face, thatt notheinge was Spared to mainteyne Lyfe and to doe those things which seame incredible, as to digge upp deade corpes outt of graves and to eate them. And some have Licked upp the Bloode which hathe fallen from their weake fellowes.

http://www.history.org/Foundation/journal/Win...
Chicopee wrote:
<quoted text>
Keep quoting your revisionist history bullshit.
There is no archeological evidence of cannibalism in Jamestown. There was one story about one guy who went insane and supposedly ate his wife, a story that was added to and embellished. It's your mind. If you want to polute it with BS and swallow it as fact, that's your choice.
The Wampanoag Indians did help the Pilgrims. They had lost up to eighty percent of their population to the plague, and saw in the Pilgrims the opportunity to form a treaty, largely in order to protect themselves from the Narragansett tribe.
The natives of this land didn't all live in peace and unity. Far from it. Anglos were known to be here on the east coast as early as the year 1002 and there are many instances of anglos and natives banding together against common enemies. There is also ample evidence of eastern tribes adapting to the ways of anglos...but all of this is irrelevant today.
To the victor goes the spoils. That reality is just as true for the Natives of America as it is for the natives of nearly every modern nation on earth, including many of the native tribes "absorbed" by the Aztecs and Incas. Deal with it.
Chicopee

Danbury, CT

#603 Mar 1, 2013
Eric Gustafson wrote:
When dearth and disease swept through Jamestown, reducing its population perhaps by 80 percent in the catastrophic Starving Time of 160910, some individuals had turned to cannibalism out of hunger. As Percy and other survivors told it, sporadic cannibalism was a manifestation of a partial breakdown in civilized society in the face of inescapable disaster:
A worlde of miseries ensewed as the Sequell will expresse unto yow, in so mutche thatt some to satisfye their hunger have robbed the store for the which I Caused them to be executed. Then haveinge fedd upon our horses and other beastes as longe as they Lasted, we weare gladd to make shifte with vermin as doggs Catts, Ratts and myce all was fishe thatt Came to Nett to satisfye Crewell hunger, as to eate Bootes shoes or any other leather some Colde come by. And those beinge Spente and devoured some weare inforced to searche the woodes and to feede upon Serpentts and snakes and to digge the earthe for wylde and unknowne Rootes, where many of our men weare Cutt of and slayne by the Salvages. And now famin beginneinge to Looke gastely and pale in every face, thatt notheinge was Spared to mainteyne Lyfe and to doe those things which seame incredible, as to digge upp deade corpes outt of graves and to eate them. And some have Licked upp the Bloode which hathe fallen from their weake fellowes.
http://www.history.org/Foundation/journal/Win...
<quoted text>
We all know the story. But the fact remains that there is no archeological evidence of cannibalism, aside from one man who apparently went mad and killed his wife, salted her and so on. He was executed for murder. And while archeologists think the may have identified her remains, there is no evidence of butchering, just a caved in skull.
By the time the story got back to England, it was widely recognized as an embellishment of a gruesome and titalating tale...the stories actually grew to monstrous proportions.
They were also vigorously refuted by other witnesses.
The removal of organs requires cutting...it's not like we see in the movies. Even starving, half mad people who regularly butchered and dressed all animals before they dined, aren't going to harvest intestines. Therefore, there would be cutting evidence on the bones. None has ever been found on any human remains, though evidence was found that showed they ate just about anything that moved, including mice and rats. Futhermore, bodies generally weren't buried in winter, especially one as harsh as that one was. They were usually stored until thaw, which throws a wrench in the "dug them up and ate them" story. They certainly didn't dig up and harvest bodies that were long dead...that would simply be suicide and a horrific death, at that.
Chicopee

Danbury, CT

#604 Mar 1, 2013
Eric Gustafson wrote:
In 1607, after illegally breaking from the Church of England, the Separatists settled in the Netherlands, Due to economic difficulties, as well as fears that they would lose their English language and heritage, they began to make plans to settle in the New World. Their intended destination was a region near the Hudson River.
Squanto taught the Pilgrims how to plant corn, which became an important crop, as well as where to fish and hunt beaver. In the fall of 1621, the Pilgrims famously shared a harvest feast with the Pokanokets; the meal is now considered the basis for the Thanksgiving holiday.
The Massachusetts and Narragansetts, were not so well disposed towards European settlers, and Massasoit's alliance with the Pilgrims disrupted relations among Native American peoples in the region. Over the next decades, relations between settlers and Native Americans deteriorated as the former group occupied more and more land.
In 1675, Bradford's predictions came true, in the form of King Philip's War.(Philip was the English name of Metacomet, the son of Massasoit and leader of the Pokanokets since the early 1660s.) That conflict left some 5,000 inhabitants of New England dead, three quarters of those Native Americans.
<quoted text>
Nice, brief summary...is there a point?

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