Support for lower military drinking age

Support for lower military drinking age

There are 37 comments on the The Augusta Chronicle story from Sep 11, 2010, titled Support for lower military drinking age. In it, The Augusta Chronicle reports that:

ST. MARYS, Ga. - Proposed legislation to allow service members under 21 to drink beer and wine at base restaurants and clubs has strong support among military leaders, U.S. Rep.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Augusta Chronicle.

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chum

United States

#1 Sep 12, 2010
Who remembers 3.2 beer? Ba Moui Ba, San Miguel and Carling Black Label for $0.30 a 6 pack?
Marion

Inola, OK

#2 Sep 12, 2010
If they are fighting for our country, let them drink.
Don't let them off base.
cheesegrits

United States

#3 Sep 12, 2010
If you are old enough to put your life on the line for your country, you are old enough to have a cold beer when you are off duty.

Here's to ya'!
Jay Moreno

Dornsife, PA

#4 Sep 12, 2010
I remember both beer and sodas being ten cents per can in Dong Ha in 68/69.

Hard liquor was generally $1.00 per fifth, except for the fancy stuff like Courvosier which was $1.25.

What drove the Marines nuts was that if you were a Marine, you had to be an E-6 (staff sgt.) to have hard liquor on you ration card. However, we Navy corpsman with the Marines had the liquor ration on our cards, even for E-1s.

There was way more hard liquor on a monthly ration card than you would want o buy unless you were a serious alcoholic. As a result, we corpsmen could buy it ands use it to trade with Marines for stuff we wanted.

During my first six months in country, I performed minor surgery at the Hoa Khanh Childrens Hospital at eh Marine supply base outside of Da Nang. For our Christmas party for ourselves and all the corpsmen in the area who could make it, we traded abput 4 bottles of booze to a chow hall Sgt.(E-5) for, literally, an entire side of beef. We had it laid out on a table where everyone could come up, grab a knife and a bone saw and carve off a piece to grill.

I took my thick steak and injected it with about 20 cc's of Courovsier cognac before grilling it. Man, was that good!
Gut Buster

Phillips, ME

#6 Sep 12, 2010
Jay you are truly full of shit. No one in RVN in 68 was lower than an E-3 unless they were busted down. I was all over III corp including Saigon, Vung Tau and Bien Hua. I never used a ration card when I went to these major bases. Side of raw beef you are full of it. I did some time with the marines in I corp. in 68. they got 2 cans of hot beer a day. all the meat was pre cut and dry frozen fro australia or canned "B" rations.
Go Blue

Lake Worth, FL

#7 Sep 12, 2010
Seems i can remember this debate over drinking ages, during the war in Vietnam.....
Gut Buster

Phillips, ME

#8 Sep 12, 2010
Jay You really pissed me off! I was a Senior SSG then. The Joint Chiefs of Staff had put out a regulation that No One, I repeat No One would be allowed to go in country (RVN) below the age of 18 or below the rank of E-3. Too many 17 year old Pvts were killed by then and the heat was on from home. I do not doubt that you were in-country nor do I doubt you were a corpsman then. I do doubt that you were a combat corpsman going out with the mud marines (maybe you were with a Navy equivalent of a Field Hospital or to a detached aid station as an orderly though). I'll put my combat awards and decorations up against anyone especially you. I flew my military retirement American flag yestorday did you? If not keep your mouth shut.
Gut Buster

Phillips, ME

#9 Sep 12, 2010
Forgot what I was going to say! If they can Die in the military and are over 18, let them drink 3.2 beer on base, they do now anyway. They have older friends who will buy it for them and even help them drink it.
Jay Moreno

Dornsife, PA

#10 Sep 12, 2010
Folks, trust me - it is this "Gut Buster" ass who is full of shit.

While what he said about E-3's is true, it is also true that you could be busted in Vietnam.

I arrived in country in late October of 1968 as an HM3. I was coming from Camp Pendleton (Las Pulgas) to be exact, where I had just served a full year with 5th MarDiv (Delta Co., 5th Medical Bn., to be exact, with 2 months TAD to Vietnameses language school in Kaheohe Bay, HI.

My first duty station was Camp Brooks, the large Marine logistics base and home to FLC (Force Logistics Command.) I volunteered to work for my first 6 months at the Hoa Khanh Children's Hospital there on base, a facitilty build by Seabees with funds raised from and by the Marines.

My second six months (from April 1, 1969, through rotation in early November of '69, I was assigned to FLSG-Bravo (Force Logistics Service Group-Bravo), a forward supply base of FLC, located in Dong Ha, just below the DMZ, and near the mouth of the Cua Viet River.

At the rank of HM2 (E-5), I was the senior corpsman for the command, resposnsible for the health maintenenace and immediate first aid needs of a 400 Marine detachment. My medical bunker was open for business 24-7, 365.

Every other week, it was my turn to ride in the truck with the armed convoy security detail on convoys down Hwy 1, up over the Hai Van pass, and into Camp Brooks in Da Nang and back. By that time, that area was fairly safe in the daytime, thanks to patrolling Loaches with Cobra backup.
We never got hit on those trips - just a few accidents.

In the intervening weeks, I rode convoy escort out past the Rock Pile to LZ Stud (Camp Vandergriff Combat Base.) There were still occassional mining incidents along the route, but no attacks. However, we did have to spend the night at LZ Stud rather than risk getting caught in the dark on the way back. One night when I was there we had a rip snorting rocket attack. Come to think of it, we had one rocket come in up there in broad daylight shortly after we arrived. Just one.

However, on three differnedt occasions, I was running around Dong Ha Combat base in the middle of the night treating casualities DURING a rocket attack. Had one land in the middel of the road in front of me just as I was coming around the end of the runway. The damned hole was still smoking when I straddled it.

Folks, as the turd who calls himself Gut Buster" knows full well, no two people arriving in Vietnam on the same day had the same experiences.

Where you were and how often you got shot at was the luck of the draw. Trust ne - folks with medals for heroism did not go looking for the opportunity to earn them. They just did their duty to their fellows when the occassion demanded it. Beware of bragadocious assholes who offer to "stack their medals up against" any other veteran's.

By the way, turd, what I said about he ration cards is exactly accurate. And in Camp Brooks, there were, in fact, whole sides of beef. It was the main supply base upon which the entirety of all USMC operations in RVN were dependent, you damned dumb grunt.

Next, you'll be telling me that I never steamed live Maine lobsters in the small autoclave in my Dong Ha bunker, pilfered by a Marine aide from General Thompson's personal pantry then traded to a Marine buddy of mine who worked the night shift at the base bakery for fresh bread and pies.

Face it, Jarhead, corpsmen are way smarter. They ARE your few good men!
Jay Moreno

Dornsife, PA

#11 Sep 12, 2010
Hell, I just re-read this fool's posts. Hew was not even a Jarhead, but a II Corps DogFace from the delta! Ands yet, he puports to know what went on in the Marines Corps in I Corps.

Now who's full of shit!?
Jay Moreno

Dornsife, PA

#12 Sep 12, 2010
Oh, and I misspoke. The name of the huge logistics base was not Camp Brooks, but Camp Books.
Jay Moreno

Dornsife, PA

#13 Sep 12, 2010
By the way, "Gut-Buster," apparently Marines ate better than you Dog Faces. I've never had more steak in my entire life than I had in the six months I served in Dong Ha. Sometimes, the chow hall would serve it several times a week. I'm talking T-bones and New York strips.

I'll never forget this conversation. One day, I was standing in line in the Sgt. E-5's mess (the Corps is nutty about ranks separation. You had one part of the cross-shaped mess hall for snuffys (E-1 thru E-4), then a Sgt. E-5 mess, then a staff NCO mess, then the officers mess.) One Marine was behind me. Another Marine walked up behind him and asked "Hey, man what are they serving today?" In a disgusted tone, the Marine behind me replied "STEAK!" After a few choice expletives, the first Marine said "Damn, when are they going to have something good again, like maybe a hot dog, for Chrissake!?"

However, when I was on convoy escort duty, I ate C-rations, unless we had managed to comshau some long-rats.
Jay Moreno

Dornsife, PA

#14 Sep 12, 2010
Oh, and by the way Dog Face, the Marine who worked the night shift in the bakery at Dong Ha and was able to trade pies and bread for lobsters was Pvt.(E-1) Paul Allard, busted from LCpl (E-3) and sentenced to work in the bakery. He was a radioman by training. No E-1s, eh? Horse hockey.
Gut Buster

Phillips, ME

#15 Sep 12, 2010
I was an MOS 11B3Y. You figure it out smart one. I worked with the Swift Boats (brown water Navy) in III&IV Corps also with the real Marines in I Corp.
No one who wasn't there cares about what was done in a war 40+ years ago. and yes! I am proud of my Combat Infantryman's Badge and my Navy Meritorious Unit Citation I never saw another one on an army Guy except we few. PS Did you fly your American Flag yesterday or do you even own one? I never saw an Atheist or Agnostic who was under fire and not afraid during a lull!!!
Jay Moreno

Dornsife, PA

#16 Sep 12, 2010
By the way, shit head, I received a medal from the Army. I forget the name of the thing (I've got it around here somewhere) but it is one they have for folks from other branches who impress the hell out of them during joint operations. And yes, I also have a NUC. BFD.

And Ron, if you're so damned proud, why not use your real name.

Oh, yes, shit head, my "CAR" (Combat Action Ribbon) did not come out of a Cracker Jack box, either.
Jay Moreno

Dornsife, PA

#17 Sep 12, 2010
Oh, yeah, Army Achievement Medal, that was it.
ANON

North Anson, ME

#18 Sep 12, 2010
Ist Air Cav. Division here. Jay, you make me sick with your denigration of ANY of our troops. Get over yourself, little man.
Bud Wizer

Inola, OK

#19 Sep 12, 2010
Jay Moreno wrote:
Oh, yeah, Army Achievement Medal, that was it.
DA squid oil checker. You did not even get that little blue ribbon since you are bragging?
Wise asser

Inola, OK

#20 Sep 12, 2010
I wasn't in the navy yet got a NUC.
Go Blue

Lake Worth, FL

#21 Sep 12, 2010
I have the biggest dick, and i was never in the military......

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