19-Aug-10 - Rep. Smith Condemns Human...

19-Aug-10 - Rep. Smith Condemns Human Rights Violations Of Catholics In Vietnam

There are 9 comments on the Global Catholic Network EWTN story from Aug 19, 2010, titled 19-Aug-10 - Rep. Smith Condemns Human Rights Violations Of Catholics In Vietnam. In it, Global Catholic Network EWTN reports that:

At an August 18 hearing in Washington D.C., Rep. Chris Smith condemned the human rights violations of Catholics in Vietnam, calling on Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to 'postpone indefinitely taking U.S.-Vietnam relations to the 'next level' until the Government of Vietnam can prove that they too are concerned about and willing to stop rampant ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Global Catholic Network EWTN.

SpongeBob

Springfield, IL

#1 Aug 20, 2010
Vietnamese leader calls on police to stop political parties forming

Hanoi - Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung has called on police to ensure no alternative political parties
are formed that might threaten the control of the communist government, state media reported Wednesday.In a speech Tuesday at a ceremony mark

Posted : Wed, 18 Aug 2010 04:23:42 GMT
By : dpa
Category : Asia (World)
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Hanoi - Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung has called on police to ensure no alternative political parties are formed that might threaten the control of the communist government, state media reported Wednesday.

In a speech Tuesday at a ceremony marking the 65th anniversary of the public security forces, he told police to fight the "cunning plots of hostile forces," the police newspaper Cong An Nhan Dan reported.

"The police are determined not to allow political opposition parties to be established to oppose our government," Dung said.

The official Vietnam News said Dung congratulated police for having "ceaselessly strengthened their solid political spirit and loyalty to the party, state and the people."

On August 13, Ho Chi Minh City police arrested Pham Minh Hoang, 55, a maths professor, on charges of belonging to the banned foreign-based political group Viet Tan.

The government often steps up arrests of political activists in the period preceding the Communist Party congress, which takes place once every five years. The next one is slated for the first half of 2011.
cchoDeoRa ho chi minh

Chicago, IL

#2 Aug 20, 2010
SpongeBob

Toronto, Canada

#3 Aug 20, 2010
...Ua, thang gia nao giong GiaChicago zay ta? DitMe ngoi XeLan suot ...mua thu zay ma khoai "no" chien chen choi. Eehehehehee!
VN still 100ak47 land

Springfield, IL

#4 Aug 24, 2010
The bad news and then the really bad news in Vietnam
Monday, 23 August 2010 15:01 Roger Mitton .

LET’s take the really bad news first, because not only did it stink, but the Western governments that would normally lambast this kind of thing held their noses and moved on.

Last Tuesday, at the 65th anniversary of Vietnam’s public security forces, Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung urged the country’s police to continue to crush any fledgling political bodies that might threaten the ruling Communist Party regime.

He told the security services to fight the “cunning plots of hostile forces and to prevent political opposition parties setting up to threaten our government.”

Vietnam’s constitution forbids the existence of any political party except the Communist Party of Vietnam. Keep that in mind when you castigate Myanmar, which may horribly oppress opposition parties, but at least allows them to exist.

Days before Dung’s odious exhortation, its effects were demonstrated when the police arrested Professor Pham Minh Hoang, a lecturer in applied mathematics at the Ho Chi Minh City Institute of Technology.

Hoang was charged with belonging to an opposition group, and while he was being arrested, the police read out Article 79 of Vietnam’s penal code, which bars “activities aimed at overthrowing the government”.

Under this provision, the authorities have detained dozens of pro-democracy activists and independent bloggers and sentenced them to years in jail.

An American diplomat in Hanoi informed me that public security officials have claimed quite aggressively that political dissidents were criminals.
“That is stupid and offensive,” he said.

But there was a deafening silence from the United States and Europe.

Indeed, last month, on the 15th anniversary of the normalisation of ties between Washington and Hanoi, the US senate foreign relations chairman, Senator John Kerry, said:“Vietnam’s domestic politics are gradually changing, becoming more open and transparent.”

Of course, they are. That’s why they arrested Hoang. That’s why they ban other political parties. That’s why they censor the internet.

That’s why, every Tuesday, the nation’s editors in chief troop over to the information ministry to be told what they can and can’t write.

Sure, Senator Kerry, things are getting more open and transparent in Vietnam. And pigs are flying higher too, you know.

Memo to Hanoi: There is nothing wrong with people getting involved in politics. As former US President John F Kennedy said:“Political action is the highest responsibility of a citizen.”

And now the bad news.
Vietnam has a collapsing currency. Last Tuesday, the same day that Hoang was arrested, Prime Minister Dung’s government devalued the dong for the third time since last November.

After the official 2.1 percent devaluation, the dong plummetted further and was not helped when a government adviser let slip that Vietnam risked a foreign-currency liquidity “shock”.

Its currency has now slumped 5.2 percent this year – the worst performance among 17 monitored Asian currencies.

Vietnam has racked up a catastrophic trade deficit this year that has nearly doubled to US$7.4 billion in the seven months to July.

It also has the world’s worst-performing stock market. The benchmark VN Index has dropped 8.4 percent this month, the most of 93 markets tracked by Bloomberg globally.

Dung’s communist regime is not only throwing innocent pro-democracy advocates into jail, but has proved utterly inept at running an economy.
Second memo to the dinosaurs: Consider why, despite social unrest, Thailand’s economy is booming.

http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index.php/201008...

That last sentence should be blown up and hung over the desk of every Vietnamese official involved in leading its still largely state-run economy into bankruptcy.
VN still VC ak47 land

Springfield, IL

#5 Aug 24, 2010
The bad news and then the really bad news in Vietnam
Monday, 23 August 2010 15:01 Roger Mitton .
LET’s take the really bad news first, because not only did it stink, but the Western governments that would normally lambast this kind of thing held their noses and moved on.
Last Tuesday, at the 65th anniversary of Vietnam’s public security forces, Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung urged the country’s police to continue to crush any fledgling political bodies that might threaten the ruling Communist Party regime.
He told the security services to fight the “cunning plots of hostile forces and to prevent political opposition parties setting up to threaten our government.”
Vietnam’s constitution forbids the existence of any political party except the Communist Party of Vietnam. Keep that in mind when you castigate Myanmar, which may horribly oppress opposition parties, but at least allows them to exist.
Days before Dung’s odious exhortation, its effects were demonstrated when the police arrested Professor Pham Minh Hoang, a lecturer in applied mathematics at the Ho Chi Minh City Institute of Technology.
Hoang was charged with belonging to an opposition group, and while he was being arrested, the police read out Article 79 of Vietnam’s penal code, which bars “activities aimed at overthrowing the government”.
Under this provision, the authorities have detained dozens of pro-democracy activists and independent bloggers and sentenced them to years in jail.
An American diplomat in Hanoi informed me that public security officials have claimed quite aggressively that political dissidents were criminals.
“That is stupid and offensive,” he said.
But there was a deafening silence from the United States and Europe.
Indeed, last month, on the 15th anniversary of the normalisation of ties between Washington and Hanoi, the US senate foreign relations chairman, Senator John Kerry, said:“Vietnam’s domestic politics are gradually changing, becoming more open and transparent.”
Of course, they are. That’s why they arrested Hoang. That’s why they ban other political parties. That’s why they censor the internet.
That’s why, every Tuesday, the nation’s editors in chief troop over to the information ministry to be told what they can and can’t write.
Sure, Senator Kerry, things are getting more open and transparent in Vietnam. And pigs are flying higher too, you know.
Memo to Hanoi: There is nothing wrong with people getting involved in politics. As former US President John F Kennedy said:“Political action is the highest responsibility of a citizen.”
And now the bad news.
Vietnam has a collapsing currency. Last Tuesday, the same day that Hoang was arrested, Prime Minister Dung’s government devalued the dong for the third time since last November.
After the official 2.1 percent devaluation, the dong plummetted further and was not helped when a government adviser let slip that Vietnam risked a foreign-currency liquidity “shock”.
Its currency has now slumped 5.2 percent this year – the worst performance among 17 monitored Asian currencies.
Vietnam has racked up a catastrophic trade deficit this year that has nearly doubled to US$7.4 billion in the seven months to July.
It also has the world’s worst-performing stock market. The benchmark VN Index has dropped 8.4 percent this month, the most of 93 markets tracked by Bloomberg globally.
Dung’s communist regime is not only throwing innocent pro-democracy advocates into jail, but has proved utterly inept at running an economy.
Second memo to the dinosaurs: Consider why, despite social unrest, Thailand’s economy is booming.
That last sentence should be blown up and hung over the desk of every Vietnamese official involved in leading its still largely state-run economy into bankruptcy.

http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index.php/201008...
VN still VC ak47 land

Springfield, IL

#6 Aug 24, 2010
The bad news and then the really bad news in Vietnam
Monday, 23 August 2010 15:01 Roger Mitton .

LET’s take the really bad news first, because not only did it stink, but the Western governments that would normally lambast this kind of thing held their noses and moved on.

Last Tuesday, at the 65th anniversary of Vietnam’s public security forces, Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung urged the country’s police to continue to crush any fledgling political bodies that might threaten the ruling Communist Party regime.

He told the security services to fight the “cunning plots of hostile forces and to prevent political opposition parties setting up to threaten our government.”

Vietnam’s constitution forbids the existence of any political party except the Communist Party of Vietnam. Keep that in mind when you castigate Myanmar, which may horribly oppress opposition parties, but at least allows them to exist.

Days before Dung’s odious exhortation, its effects were demonstrated when the police arrested Professor Pham Minh Hoang, a lecturer in applied mathematics at the Ho Chi Minh City Institute of Technology.

Hoang was charged with belonging to an opposition group, and while he was being arrested, the police read out Article 79 of Vietnam’s penal code, which bars “activities aimed at overthrowing the government”.

Under this provision, the authorities have detained dozens of pro-democracy activists and independent bloggers and sentenced them to years in jail.

An American diplomat in Hanoi informed me that public security officials have claimed quite aggressively that political dissidents were criminals.
“That is stupid and offensive,” he said.

But there was a deafening silence from the United States and Europe.

Indeed, last month, on the 15th anniversary of the normalisation of ties between Washington and Hanoi, the US senate foreign relations chairman, Senator John Kerry, said:“Vietnam’s domestic politics are gradually changing, becoming more open and transparent.”

Of course, they are. That’s why they arrested Hoang. That’s why they ban other political parties. That’s why they censor the internet.

That’s why, every Tuesday, the nation’s editors in chief troop over to the information ministry to be told what they can and can’t write.

Sure, Senator Kerry, things are getting more open and transparent in Vietnam. And pigs are flying higher too, you know.

Memo to Hanoi: There is nothing wrong with people getting involved in politics. As former US President John F Kennedy said:“Political action is the highest responsibility of a citizen.”

And now the bad news.
Vietnam has a collapsing currency. Last Tuesday, the same day that Hoang was arrested, Prime Minister Dung’s government devalued the dong for the third time since last November.

After the official 2.1 percent devaluation, the dong plummetted further and was not helped when a government adviser let slip that Vietnam risked a foreign-currency liquidity “shock”.

Its currency has now slumped 5.2 percent this year – the worst performance among 17 monitored Asian currencies.

Vietnam has racked up a catastrophic trade deficit this year that has nearly doubled to US$7.4 billion in the seven months to July.

It also has the world’s worst-performing stock market. The benchmark VN Index has dropped 8.4 percent this month, the most of 93 markets tracked by Bloomberg globally.

Dung’s communist regime is not only throwing innocent pro-democracy advocates into jail, but has proved utterly inept at running an economy.
Second memo to the dinosaurs: Consider why, despite social unrest, Thailand’s economy is booming.

That last sentence should be blown up and hung over the desk of every Vietnamese official involved in leading its still largely state-run economy into bankruptcy.
cchoDeoRa ho chi minh wrote:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/w wwflickrcomputer/2069972705/
vc commie ak47 ZOO

Chicago, IL

#9 Aug 28, 2010
Tragic Details Emerge in Vietnamese Persecution. ICC

Washington, D.C: August 28, 2010. International Christian Concern (ICC) has learned new details about recent religious persecution in Vietnam and the following brutal cover-up.

Vietnamese authorities ordered the Christian Con Dau village, near the city of Da Nang, to be abandoned to build a resort on the site. When the people resisted water irrigation was shut off to the rice fields, cutting the main source of income and food. On May 4, 2010, Vietnamese police surrounded and attacked a funeral as it approached the cemetery. Police arrested and beat 62 persons including women that were stripped naked. One pregnant woman, Le Thi Van, was struck in her stomach until she had a miscarriage.

After the initial incident, special police units have since returned to Con Dau multiple times, demanding information and forcing villagers to sign self-incriminating statements and to spy on each other. Those suspected of taking pictures and communicating to the outside world have been beaten. Some villagers have been forced to return to the local police station for further interrogation and torture.

http://www.topix.com/forum/world/vietnam/T3II...

One of the funeral procession leaders, Thomas Nam Nguyen, refused to return to the police station after being recalled and beaten multiple times. On July 2, the police came to his house and caught him as he tried to escape. He was handcuffed and ordered to kneel with his head on the ground while the police kicked his back, chest and head. His wife was present and begged the police to stop. They continued to beat him for approximately four hours, and then released him in critical condition. On July 3, he died at home in the hands of his mother, surrounded by his wife and three children.

“The people of Con Dau are living in desperate fear and confusion,” said Dr. Thang Nguyen in an interview with ICC. Dr. Nguyen is the Executive Director of Boat People SOS, the organization representing the Con Dau victims.“Hundreds of residents have been fined, and many have escaped to Thailand.”

Eight individuals are still in police custody and are awaiting trial. To date no family members have been able to see them. Their names are Nguyen Huu Liem, Tran Thanh Viet, Doan Cang, Le Thanh Lam, Nguyen Thi The, Phan Thi Nhan, Nguyen Thi Lieu, and Nguyen Huu Minh.

On August 18, Congress held a hearing on Vietnamese persecution, focusing on the Con Dau incident. Witnesses included the brother of Thomas Nam Nguyen, a brother of a villager who escaped to Thailand, and a sister of two who are currently imprisoned. It was noted that the U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam, Michael W. Michalak, said that the incident was a land dispute and refused to become directly involved.

ICC’s Regional Manager, Logan Maurer, stated,“The Vietnamese government has exposed its brutality and greed, torturing and killing Christians to make room for their ambition. The tourist resort they plan to build in Con Dau will have its foundation in blood. In 2006 the US State Department removed Vietnam from the Country of Particular Concern (CPC) list, citing progress in religious freedom. This incident shows it could not be more wrong.”
vc commie stealin

Chicago, IL

#10 Aug 28, 2010
Tragic Details Emerge in Vietnamese Persecution. ICC

Washington, D.C: August 28, 2010. International Christian Concern (ICC) has learned new details about recent religious persecution in Vietnam and the following brutal cover-up.

Vietnamese authorities ordered the Christian Con Dau village, near the city of Da Nang, to be abandoned to build a resort on the site. When the people resisted water irrigation was shut off to the rice fields, cutting the main source of income and food. On May 4, 2010, Vietnamese police surrounded and attacked a funeral as it approached the cemetery. Police arrested and beat 62 persons including women that were stripped naked. One pregnant woman, Le Thi Van, was struck in her stomach until she had a miscarriage.

After the initial incident, special police units have since returned to Con Dau multiple times, demanding information and forcing villagers to sign self-incriminating statements and to spy on each other. Those suspected of taking pictures and communicating to the outside world have been beaten. Some villagers have been forced to return to the local police station for further interrogation and torture.

One of the funeral procession leaders, Thomas Nam Nguyen, refused to return to the police station after being recalled and beaten multiple times. On July 2, the police came to his house and caught him as he tried to escape. He was handcuffed and ordered to kneel with his head on the ground while the police kicked his back, chest and head. His wife was present and begged the police to stop. They continued to beat him for approximately four hours, and then released him in critical condition. On July 3, he died at home in the hands of his mother, surrounded by his wife and three children.

http://www.topix.com/forum/world/vietnam/T3II...

“The people of Con Dau are living in desperate fear and confusion,” said Dr. Thang Nguyen in an interview with ICC. Dr. Nguyen is the Executive Director of Boat People SOS, the organization representing the Con Dau victims.“Hundreds of residents have been fined, and many have escaped to Thailand.”

Eight individuals are still in police custody and are awaiting trial. To date no family members have been able to see them. Their names are Nguyen Huu Liem, Tran Thanh Viet, Doan Cang, Le Thanh Lam, Nguyen Thi The, Phan Thi Nhan, Nguyen Thi Lieu, and Nguyen Huu Minh.

On August 18, Congress held a hearing on Vietnamese persecution, focusing on the Con Dau incident. Witnesses included the brother of Thomas Nam Nguyen, a brother of a villager who escaped to Thailand, and a sister of two who are currently imprisoned. It was noted that the U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam, Michael W. Michalak, said that the incident was a land dispute and refused to become directly involved.

ICC’s Regional Manager, Logan Maurer, stated,“The Vietnamese government has exposed its brutality and greed, torturing and killing Christians to make room for their ambition. The tourist resort they plan to build in Con Dau will have its foundation in blood. In 2006 the US State Department removed Vietnam from the Country of Particular Concern (CPC) list, citing progress in religious freedom. This incident shows it could not be more wrong.”
vc commie land

Chicago, IL

#11 Aug 28, 2010
Tragic Details Emerge in Vietnamese Persecution. ICC

Washington, D.C: August 28, 2010. International Christian Concern (ICC) has learned new details about recent religious persecution in Vietnam and the following brutal cover-up.

Vietnamese authorities ordered the Christian Con Dau village, near the city of Da Nang, to be abandoned to build a resort on the site. When the people resisted water irrigation was shut off to the rice fields, cutting the main source of income and food. On May 4, 2010, Vietnamese police surrounded and attacked a funeral as it approached the cemetery. Police arrested and beat 62 persons including women that were stripped naked. One pregnant woman, Le Thi Van, was struck in her stomach until she had a miscarriage.

After the initial incident, special police units have since returned to Con Dau multiple times, demanding information and forcing villagers to sign self-incriminating statements and to spy on each other. Those suspected of taking pictures and communicating to the outside world have been beaten. Some villagers have been forced to return to the local police station for further interrogation and torture.

One of the funeral procession leaders, Thomas Nam Nguyen, refused to return to the police station after being recalled and beaten multiple times. On July 2, the police came to his house and caught him as he tried to escape. He was handcuffed and ordered to kneel with his head on the ground while the police kicked his back, chest and head. His wife was present and begged the police to stop. They continued to beat him for approximately four hours, and then released him in critical condition. On July 3, he died at home in the hands of his mother, surrounded by his wife and three children.

“The people of Con Dau are living in desperate fear and confusion,” said Dr. Thang Nguyen in an interview with ICC. Dr. Nguyen is the Executive Director of Boat People SOS, the organization representing the Con Dau victims.“Hundreds of residents have been fined, and many have escaped to Thailand.”

Eight individuals are still in police custody and are awaiting trial. To date no family members have been able to see them. Their names are Nguyen Huu Liem, Tran Thanh Viet, Doan Cang, Le Thanh Lam, Nguyen Thi The, Phan Thi Nhan, Nguyen Thi Lieu, and Nguyen Huu Minh.

http://www.topix.com/forum/world/vietnam/T3II...

On August 18, Congress held a hearing on Vietnamese persecution, focusing on the Con Dau incident. Witnesses included the brother of Thomas Nam Nguyen, a brother of a villager who escaped to Thailand, and a sister of two who are currently imprisoned. It was noted that the U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam, Michael W. Michalak, said that the incident was a land dispute and refused to become directly involved.

ICC’s Regional Manager, Logan Maurer, stated,“The Vietnamese government has exposed its brutality and greed, torturing and killing Christians to make room for their ambition. The tourist resort they plan to build in Con Dau will have its foundation in blood. In 2006 the US State Department removed Vietnam from the Country of Particular Concern (CPC) list, citing progress in religious freedom. This incident shows it could not be more wrong.”

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