Pilot Defends Experimental Planes After Saturday's Fatal Crash

Tulsa's aviation community is mourning a fellow pilot. Kevin Covell and his mother died Saturday when his experimental plane crashed near Collinsville. Full Story
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chuck S

Francisco, IN

#1 Jun 1, 2010
I dont feel its right for any government to set things like cameras around the state. Alot of times the situation are abused and turns into completely different at our expense. It the state government wants to make more money. Start cutting their wages or saleries. that would be fair, you think?
Gena

AOL

#2 Jun 1, 2010
chuck S wrote:
I dont feel its right for any government to set things like cameras around the state. Alot of times the situation are abused and turns into completely different at our expense. It the state government wants to make more money.
Start cutting their wages or saleries. that would be fair, you think?
I TOTALLY AGREE!!!!!!!!!!
David

Martinsburg, WV

#3 Jun 1, 2010
Ummmm, what does this have to do with an airplane crash that killed a man and his mother? God be with their families.
Northside_Yo

Sand Springs, OK

#4 Jun 1, 2010
Engine failure shortly after or during taking off is the primary reason small planes crash. It happens to experimental (Home built) or factory built planes.

Unfortunately, that is the time you're using the engine the hardest, and if something is going to fail, that's the time.
Northside_Yo

Sand Springs, OK

#5 Jun 1, 2010
chuck S wrote:
I dont feel its right for any government to set things like cameras around the state. Alot of times the situation are abused and turns into completely different at our expense. It the state government wants to make more money. Start cutting their wages or saleries. that would be fair, you think?
Why is it OK on the Turnpikes to catch people running the tolls but unacceptable to use on highways to catch people who drive without insurance?

If you, like me, have ever been hit by an illegal uninsured motorist you might change your tune.
Porky

United States

#6 Jun 2, 2010
This story is written like we all knew the engine failed on take-off. This is new information, and it should be exposed as such. It defines why the aircraft went down. Pilots all have varying skills, and an engine failure does not automatically equal death. Engine failure is something to consider, and something to spend time on your pre-flight. You can read over 1000 NTSB articles where pilots try to do a 180 and return to the field. In less than 1% do they succeed. It is called a suicide turn for a good reason. The answer to the test question, is "keep the wings flying" and that requires airspeed. If you run out of airspeed at low altitude, your flight is over and you are screwed. Always fly the aircraft to a clearing within a 40 degree arc. More than 40 degrees and you have to put too much drag on the plane, and you lose airspeed, or what pilots refer to as blood. If you lose blood out of an artery you will die, and if you lose airspeed at an altitude that you can't replace it in a dive, then you will die. If you know you're going to die, and you have nothing but homes ahead, then go ahead and stall the wing and it will roll over and die in a nice smoking hole. Sometimes killing yourself is the best option.
King

Seattle, WA

#7 Jun 2, 2010
Safe?? it CRASHED and two people are dead!! YEA it"s SAFE!!!

“Flying-safer than driving...”

Since: Apr 08

KTUL/KRVS

#8 Jun 2, 2010
King wrote:
Safe?? it CRASHED and two people are dead!! YEA it"s SAFE!!!
Still safer than driving...
Nick

Euless, TX

#9 Jun 2, 2010
The plane that took the president of Poland was a giant Tu154, and the one before that was an Airbus 300. Planes crash some times. A lot more cars crash than planes, and we still use them!!!!
Texas Pilot

San Marcos, TX

#10 Jun 2, 2010
I guess I'll be the one to lay this out. In training to be a pilot, we all have trained for times of emergencies and rely on this training to kick in when one happens. You ask any pilot out there who has experienced an emergency and lived, it is very hard to determine how you are going to react to the situation until you're in it. It's so easy for experts or other people to criticize one's actions when they were not directly evolved. I just think people should be a little more respectful to the deceased and be happy for the time they were alive.
King

Seattle, WA

#11 Jun 2, 2010
Iflyfast wrote:
<quoted text>
Still safer than driving...
Yea but i did"nt bulid my car from a kit i bought it DUH!!
adam

United States

#12 Jun 2, 2010
Nick wrote:
The plane that took the president of Poland was a giant Tu154, and the one before that was an Airbus 300. Planes crash some times. A lot more cars crash than planes, and we still use them!!!!
I bet the Tu154 had a little help in it's crash.
Uncle Bob

Montgomery, AL

#14 Jun 2, 2010
Carburetors suck... Carburetor's shouldn't be used above ground level. It's too 20th Century...
I'm sure he had an electronic ignition, but that's like putting lip-stick on a pig...
Uncle Bob

Montgomery, AL

#15 Jun 2, 2010
King wrote:
<quoted text>Yea but i did"nt bulid my car from a kit i bought it DUH!!
I built my 32 Ford from a kit. Took three years. Very safe and reliable.
Coweta

United States

#16 Jun 2, 2010
ID10T Error wrote:
<quoted text>
Really? Are there millions upon millions of planes in the air everyday like there are cars?
Of course there arent as many planes crashing like cars, there are also a million less planes in the air compared to cars on the road.
That fact is adusted per capita. Aircraft are safer than automoibles, no matter how you look at the data. Look at it this way, 99% of all pilots will never experience a full engine failure in flight, much less crash as a result of it. Can you say that 99% of drivers on the roads will never be involved in an accident? If you'd like to evaluate insurance rates, most aircraft like the one in question are more expensive in value, but cheaper to insure than your car. Starting to make sense now?

Kudos to the pilot in this story setting the record straight that the aircraft involved in the accident, as well as hundreds of other models of experimental/kit aircraft are well built and safe. All we need is a bunch of people in positions of power who are clueless about aviation starting to make unfounded judgments on aviation which turn into rediculous rules/laws.(see commercial airline travel post 9/11)
beezlbub

Tulsa, OK

#17 Jun 2, 2010
King wrote:
<quoted text>Yea but i did"nt bulid my car from a kit i bought it DUH!!
yup it was a kit assembled in mexico
No kidding

Seattle, WA

#18 Jun 2, 2010
Uncle Bob wrote:
<quoted text>
I built my 32 Ford from a kit. Took three years. Very safe and reliable.
Cool!!!
No kidding

Seattle, WA

#19 Jun 2, 2010
beezlbub wrote:
<quoted text>yup it was a kit assembled in mexico
Yep sorry!!!! King you got told!!!
Retired One

Azle, TX

#20 Jun 2, 2010
'Airspeed, altitude and brains. Two are always needed to successfully complete the flight.'
Northside_Yo

Sand Springs, OK

#21 Jun 2, 2010
Porky wrote:
This story is written like we all knew the engine failed on take-off. This is new information, and it should be exposed as such. It defines why the aircraft went down. Pilots all have varying skills, and an engine failure does not automatically equal death. Engine failure is something to consider, and something to spend time on your pre-flight. You can read over 1000 NTSB articles where pilots try to do a 180 and return to the field. In less than 1% do they succeed. It is called a suicide turn for a good reason. The answer to the test question, is "keep the wings flying" and that requires airspeed. If you run out of airspeed at low altitude, your flight is over and you are screwed. Always fly the aircraft to a clearing within a 40 degree arc. More than 40 degrees and you have to put too much drag on the plane, and you lose airspeed
This is exactly correct. You glide it for the nearest open area you can see in front of you. There's a lot of stories of pilots landing in the Arkansas river (on sand) because the engine failed shortly after takeoff from R.L. Jones airport in Jenks. The river is right in front of them and they glide it down and land safely, often with no damage. Of course you could always get unlucky, but as you say, attempting to turn back to the field at low altitude and with low airspeed is a big mistake.

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