Sarah Palin reveals big tour

Sarah Palin reveals big tour

There are 10 comments on the CNN story from May 26, 2011, titled Sarah Palin reveals big tour. In it, CNN reports that:

Not two days ago, Sarah Palin was all but written off as a possible presidential contender by the national media and Republican insiders who considered the field of 2012 candidates to be settled.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at CNN.

KeepGitmoOpen

United States

#1 May 26, 2011
the only way Obama can win is if republicans beat themselves. Which just may happen..

“Obama Killed Osama”

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#2 May 26, 2011
Ok, i just thought she was already on tour since the circus comes every November here.
KeepGitmoOpen

United States

#3 May 26, 2011
Nino Green wrote:
Ok, i just thought she was already on tour since the circus comes every November here.
FYI Navy seals killed osama im pretty sure obama was sitting in a chiar at the time not busting in OBL compound.
Dan Rather

Brooksville, FL

#4 May 26, 2011
I'd rather listen to Sarah Palin produce one of her famous mooseburger farts.
Anika

East Bernstadt, KY

#5 Jun 21, 2011
I wish she would just GO AWAY.

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#6 Jul 2, 2011
Sarah Palin is sitting on between 11 and 12 years executive experience. This is more than almost any other President we have had.
The Governorship of Alaska as defined by the state Constitution is the most powerful in the nation. This has left Sarah Palin uniquely qualified to go from being the most powerful Governor in the nation to being the most powerful national leader in the world.

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#7 Jul 2, 2011
article in the NYT entitled The Unusual Challenges Palin Faced in Alaska is remarkably balanced and informative. As PrestoPundit Greg Ransom notes, though, in his post linking the article”

Remember when the Democrat press wouldn’t stop telling us about how Texas has a “weak Governor” system, when Bush was running for President? Well, don’t expect them to talk much about the fact that Alaska has the most powerful governor in the country.

New York Times:
That said, by other measures, Alaska is harder to govern than a smaller, more settled realm in the Lower 48. With vast distances, large numbers of indigenous peoples and a narrowly based extraction economy — with a handful of giant multinational oil corporations dominating the game — some economists say a country like Nigeria might be an apter comparison.

“Alaska really is a colonial place,” said Stephen Haycox, a professor of history at the University of Alaska Anchorage.“One third of the economic base is oil; another third is federal spending. The economy is extremely narrow and highly dependent. It’s not to say that Alaska is a beggar state, but it certainly is true that Alaska is dependent on decisions made outside it, and over which Alaskans don’t have great control.”

Overlaid across all of that is a distinctly informal Alaskan style. At the annual governor’s picnic, usually held in July, the governor is expected to turn the brats and burgers on the grill — something Ms. Palin has done with gusto — with cabinet members in aprons rounding out the kitchen staff. Alaska also came of political age recently, which has meant two crucial things to Ms. Palin’s rise and experience as governor.

First, the State Constitution concentrates power in the governor’s office more thoroughly than in almost any other state — a legacy of the late 1950s, historians say, when statehood and a simultaneous trend all over the country toward elevating executive authority coincided.

Alaskan governors can edit legislation and their vetoes are tougher for lawmakers to overcome. In the numerical scale of power devised by Thad Beyle, a political scientist at the University of North Carolina, only Massachusetts’ governor has a mightier tool kit.

Second, inch-deep history has meant that the leading lights of statehood are not mere names in history books but are in many cases still around and even still in power, like Senator Ted Stevens and Representative Don Young, both Republicans with decades under their belts in Washington. That old guard is still revered by some Alaskans, but it is disdained by others who have been on the lookout for fresh Republican faces.

It is in that densely layered Alaskan mix that Ms. Palin rose, governed and must be understood, academics and people in both parties say — not as merely a governor, or a woman, but as an Alaskan.

“The frontier mentality, whether myth or not, is still alive,” said Donald Linky, director of the Program on the Governor, at the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University.

Political organizations and the careful grooming of rising stars have long been part of the political culture in creating governors-to-be in many other states, Mr. Linky said. Not so in Alaska, and elsewhere in the West.
East Coast Deb

United States

#8 Jul 2, 2011
Surly Curmudgeon wrote:
article in the NYT entitled The Unusual Challenges Palin Faced in Alaska is remarkably balanced and informative. As PrestoPundit Greg Ransom notes, though, in his post linking the article”
Remember when the Democrat press wouldn’t stop telling us about how Texas has a “weak Governor” system, when Bush was running for President? Well, don’t expect them to talk much about the fact that Alaska has the most powerful governor in the country.
New York Times:
That said, by other measures, Alaska is harder to govern than a smaller, more settled realm in the Lower 48. With vast distances, large numbers of indigenous peoples and a narrowly based extraction economy — with a handful of giant multinational oil corporations dominating the game — some economists say a country like Nigeria might be an apter comparison.
“Alaska really is a colonial place,” said Stephen Haycox, a professor of history at the University of Alaska Anchorage.“One third of the economic base is oil; another third is federal spending. The economy is extremely narrow and highly dependent. It’s not to say that Alaska is a beggar state, but it certainly is true that Alaska is dependent on decisions made outside it, and over which Alaskans don’t have great control.”
Overlaid across all of that is a distinctly informal Alaskan style. At the annual governor’s picnic, usually held in July, the governor is expected to turn the brats and burgers on the grill — something Ms. Palin has done with gusto — with cabinet members in aprons rounding out the kitchen staff. Alaska also came of political age recently, which has meant two crucial things to Ms. Palin’s rise and experience as governor.
First, the State Constitution concentrates power in the governor’s office more thoroughly than in almost any other state — a legacy of the late 1950s, historians say, when statehood and a simultaneous trend all over the country toward elevating executive authority coincided.
Alaskan governors can edit legislation and their vetoes are tougher for lawmakers to overcome. In the numerical scale of power devised by Thad Beyle, a political scientist at the University of North Carolina, only Massachusetts’ governor has a mightier tool kit.
Second, inch-deep history has meant that the leading lights of statehood are not mere names in history books but are in many cases still around and even still in power, like Senator Ted Stevens and Representative Don Young, both Republicans with decades under their belts in Washington. That old guard is still revered by some Alaskans, but it is disdained by others who have been on the lookout for fresh Republican faces.
It is in that densely layered Alaskan mix that Ms. Palin rose, governed and must be understood, academics and people in both parties say — not as merely a governor, or a woman, but as an Alaskan.
“The frontier mentality, whether myth or not, is still alive,” said Donald Linky, director of the Program on the Governor, at the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University.
Political organizations and the careful grooming of rising stars have long been part of the political culture in creating governors-to-be in many other states, Mr. Linky said. Not so in Alaska, and elsewhere in the West.
Is that why she could handle only half a term?

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#9 Jul 2, 2011
East Coast Deb wrote:
<quoted text>Is that why she could handle only half a term?


Do some research Deb. Sarah detailed why in her book "Going Rouge" and in a news conference. Her resignation was a near brilliant strategic move, it took both her and the state of Alaska out of the cross-hairs of George Soros and his paid minions.
East Coast Deb

United States

#10 Jul 3, 2011
Surly Curmudgeon wrote:
<quoted text>
Do some research Deb. Sarah detailed why in her book "Going Rouge" and in a news conference. Her resignation was a near brilliant strategic move, it took both her and the state of Alaska out of the cross-hairs of George Soros and his paid minions.
Maybe I should read her book. I've always loved historical fiction.

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