Major exhibitions in Europe this fall: Alexander the Great in Amsterdam

Aug 26, 2010 Full story: www.independent.co.uk 20

Previously seen at the State Hermitage (Saint Petersburg) in 2007, this exhibition covers all the lands Alexander the Great (356 BC - 323 BC) came into contact with on his campaign of conquest in the East: Persia, Egypt, Afghanistan, India, up to the borders of Mongolia. "The immortal Alexander the Great: The myth, the reality, his journey, his legacy" is the first exhibition to present Hellenism on such a large scale as a global process of reciprocal influence between different civilizations and cultures.

Full Story
United Macedonians

Tübingen, Germany

#1 Aug 26, 2010
This exhibition explores the life of Alexander the Great, his Expedition to the East, and the influence of Hellenism over a period of almost 2,500 years.

The Immortal Alexander the Great makes a comprehensive survey of the life of Alexander III of Macedonia (356-323 BC), charting the cultural and artistic changes that occurred as a result of his numerous conquests.

The show features more than 350 items from the State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg. It is curated by Dr Anna Trofimova, Head of the Department of Classical Antiquities at the museum in St Petersburg.

Read more at Suite101: Alexander the Great - Exhibition at Hermitage Amsterdam http://specialartgalleryexhibits.suite101.com...
United Macedonians

Tübingen, Germany

#2 Aug 26, 2010
This exhibition explores the life of Alexander the Great, his Expedition to the East, and the influence of Hellenism over a period of almost 2,500 years.

The Immortal Alexander the Great makes a comprehensive survey of the life of Alexander III of Macedonia (356-323 BC), charting the cultural and artistic changes that occurred as a result of his numerous conquests.

The show features more than 350 items from the State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg. It is curated by Dr Anna Trofimova, Head of the Department of Classical Antiquities at the museum in St Petersburg.

Read more at Suite101: Alexander the Great - Exhibition at Hermitage Amsterdam http://specialartgalleryexhibits.suite101.com...
Mithridates VI

Athens, Greece

#3 Aug 26, 2010
I hope there is enough security personnel in Amsterdam otherwise fyromonkeys may attempt to steal these objects.

“MAKEDONIA IS ONLY HELLENIC”

Since: Aug 08

AND WILL ALWAYS STAY HELLENIC

#4 Aug 26, 2010
Mithridates VI wrote:
I hope there is enough security personnel in Amsterdam otherwise fyromonkeys may attempt to steal these objects.
Xaaxaxaxa
United Macedonians

Tübingen, Germany

#5 Aug 26, 2010
Wherever he went he had an enduring affect on social structures, traditions, art, architecture and languages as over a period of time conquered nations adopted the Greek influences brought by Alexander and his armies – a process known as Hellenism.

Read more at Suite101: Alexander the Great - Exhibition at Hermitage Amsterdam http://specialartgalleryexhibits.suite101.com...

“Makedonia is Hellenic”

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#6 Aug 26, 2010
Alexander the Great
September 18 - March 18
Hermitage Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Previously seen at the State Hermitage (Saint Petersburg) in 2007, this exhibition covers all the lands Alexander the Great (356 BC - 323 BC) came into contact with on his campaign of conquest in the East: Persia, Egypt, Afghanistan, India, up to the borders of Mongolia. "The immortal Alexander the Great:
The myth, the reality, his journey, his legacy" is the first exhibition to present Hellenism on such a large scale as a global process of reciprocal influence between different civilizations and cultures.
Paintings, tapestries and decorative art depicted Alexander's life and history. The exhibition covers all these aspects, with objects from classical antiquity to the modern age, of Western and non-Western origins.
http://www.hermitage.nl
from Greece EU

Greece

#7 Aug 26, 2010
Go Alexander go Greece.
MAKEDONIA ALWAYS GREECE

Ptolemaida, Greece

#9 Aug 27, 2010
United Macedonians wrote:
This exhibition explores the life of Alexander the Great, his Expedition to the East, and the influence of Hellenism over a period of almost 2,500 years.
The Immortal Alexander the Great makes a comprehensive survey of the life of Alexander III of Macedonia (356-323 BC), charting the cultural and artistic changes that occurred as a result of his numerous conquests.
The show features more than 350 items from the State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg. It is curated by Dr Anna Trofimova, Head of the Department of Classical Antiquities at the museum in St Petersburg.
Read more at Suite101: Alexander the Great - Exhibition at Hermitage Amsterdam http://specialartgalleryexhibits.suite101.com...
always true!

“NAME NOT NEGOTIABLE!!!!”

Since: May 10

MACEDONIA THEREFORE ELLAS!!

#10 Aug 28, 2010
No makedonski in the TRUTH! lol

“"MAKEDONKA"”

Since: Jul 08

Bitola

#16 Aug 28, 2010
As Philip said it a long time ago your all HOMOS!

Greek=Hellas=Athena’s=Cretans= Corinthians=Spartans= All gays to Macedonians;

Philip II of Macedon's recorded by Plutarch demonstrates:

Quote;
Homosexuality among males in the militaries and warriors of ancient Greek city-states was documented by many historians throughout the ages. However the importance of them in establishing military formations varied. The relationships themselves were widespread as remarks of Philip II of Macedon's recorded by Plutarch demonstrates:

"It is not only the most warlike peoples, the Boeotians, Spartans, and Cretans, who are the most susceptible to this kind of love but also the greatest heroes of old: Meleager, Achilles, Aristomenes, Cimon, and Epaminondas."

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1 ...

It’s easier to tell you whom I consider Greek.

**Ancient times the city-states type of government (Athens,
Corinth, Sparta and Thebes) and those that practiced the pederastic tradition;

Eromenos
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Cite This Source

In the pederastic tradition of Classical Athens, the eromenos (Greek ἐρ&#974 ;με&#957 ;ος, pl. ἐρ&#974 ;με&#957 ;οι, "eromenoi") was an adolescent boy who was in a love relationship with an adult man, known as the erastes (ἐρ&#94 5;στ&#94 2;ς).
The term for the role often varied from one polis to another. In Athens, the eromenos was also known as the paidika; in Sparta they used aites (hearer), a term also used in Thessaly; in Crete the boys were known as kleinos (glorious) and if they had fought in battle with their lover, as parastathenes (one who stands beside).
The ideal eromenos - as well as his erastes - was expected to be ruled by the principles of enkrateia, or "self-mastery," which presumed an attitude of moderation and self-restraint in all matters.

“"MAKEDONKA"”

Since: Jul 08

Bitola

#17 Aug 28, 2010
The Conquest of Greece

Quote;

Ordering the Macedonian troops to lift the sieges of the two Greek cities, Philip led the army northward across Thrace. In the spring of 339 the Macedonians clashed with the Scythians near Danube, who had recently crossed the river with large army. Philip won a stunning victory in which the Scythian king Areas was killed and took 20,000 Scythian women and children as slaves.

But on the return to Macedonia, the Thracian Triballians attacked the Macedonian convoy. The booty was lost, Philip suffered a severe injury which left him permanently lame, and the army returned home empty-handed.

The Conquest of Greece

Philip spent the following months in Macedonia recovering from the injury, but there was no time to relax. The Greeks were uniting and assembling a large army, and as historian Peter Green observed 'if Philip did not move fast it would be they who invaded his territory, not he theirs’.

As soon as he recovered, Philip assembled the largest Macedonian army yet,***gave his 18-year-old son Alexander*** a commanding post*** among the senior Macedonian generals, and marched into Greece.

The Greeks likewise assembled their largest army since the Persian invasion to face the Macedonian invasion.

At Chaeronea in central Greece where the two armies met, the whole of Greece put 35,000 infantry and 2,000 cavalry on the field, while the Macedonians had 30,000 infantry and 2,000 cavalry.

Although outnumbered, with suburb tactics and well coordination of the phalanx with the cavalry, the Macedonian ‘barbarian’ defeated the ***united Greek army***.

Among the Greeks, the Athenians, Thebans, and the Achaeans suffered the biggest losses.

The ancient Roman and Greek historians, consider the battle of Chaeronea, on August 2nd, 338 BC as an end to Greek liberty and history.

***Greece will not regain its freedom from foreign occupation until early 19th century AD.***

“"MAKEDONKA"”

Since: Jul 08

Bitola

#18 Aug 28, 2010
Alexander the great used the Corinthian leagues treaty in his favor to invade Persia.
The Corinthian league
In August 338, the Macedonian king Philip had defeated an army of Athenians and Thebans on the plain of Chaeronea, a town in Central Greece (story). The Macedonian victory meant the end of the independence of the Greek towns: Philip forced them to join the Corinthian league. The Roman author Marcus Junianus Justinus -in English better known as Justin- gives a description of the first meeting in his Excerpt of the History of Philip by Pompeius Trogus (section 9.5). The translation was made by Michael Crawford and David Whitehead.

After he had settled matters in Greece, Philip ordered that envoys should be summoned to Corinth from all the states with a view to consolidating the settlement. He there propounded a covenant of peace for the whole of Greece, giving each state the share that it deserved, and he created a council of representatives to serve as a sort of common senate.
***Only the Spartans refused to have anything to do with the king or with the covenant; they considered that a settlement imposed by the victor instead of being agreed on by the states concerned meant **enslavement,** not peace.***
Next, the military contributions were fixed that the individual states were to make, whether to assist the king against attack or for making war under his command. But everyone realized that these arrangements were directed against the Persian empire.
The text of the treaty has been partly preserved. The first line runs like this:
I swear by Zeus, Earth, Sun, Poseidon, Athena, Ares, and all the gods and goddesses.
• I will abide by the peace;
• I will not break the agreements with Philip the Macedonian;
• nor will I take up arms with hostile intent against any one of those who abide by the oaths either by land or by sea.
The provisions of the treaty were:
1. that the constitutions of the member states would remain unchanged;
2. that violence between the member states was no longer permitted;
3. that, in case of the overthrow of a government, a congress of representatives, was to meet at Corinth;
4. that it would establish the facts and declare war;
5. that the league's army was to be commanded by Philip;
6. that the league's member states would sent a number of soldiers to the league's army in proportion to their size.
http://www.livius.org/aj-al/alexander/alexand...

“"MAKEDONKA"”

Since: Jul 08

Bitola

#19 Aug 28, 2010
Alexander add his Guards

During the reign of Alexander the Great, the Macedonians spoke their own native language, as the native language language of

***Alexander the Great was not understood by the ancient Greeks (Quintus Curtius Rufus, VI, 9,***

*** 37 ). Similarly, Plutarch points out that Alexander spoke to his fellow countrymen in Macedonian: "he [Alexander] called out aloud to his guards in the Macedonian language, which was a certain sign of some great disturbance in him" (Plutarch, Alexander, 51).***

Still, Alexander spoke also Greek, loved Homer, and respected his tutor Aristotle. At the same time though, there is much evidence that generally he was not fond of the Greeks of his day. The chronicler Curtius, describing the atmosphere before a battle, gave a notion of the different attitudes of the great commander, who psychognostically applied the principle of identity to every ethnic group in his army. In respect to the various motives for taking part in that war, Curtius wrote:

"Riding to the front line he [Alexander the Great] named the soldiers and they responded from spot to spot where they were lined up. The Macedonians, who had won so many battles in Europe and set off to invade Asia ... got encouragement from him - he reminded them of their permanent values. They were the world's liberators and one day they would pass the frontiers set by Hercules and Patter Liber. They would subdue all races on Earth. Bactrius and India would become Macedonian provinces. Getting closer to the Greeks, he reminded them that those were the people who provoked war with Greece,... those were the people that burned their temples and cities ... As the Illirians and Trakians lived mainly from plunder, he told them to look at the enemy line glittering in gold ..."

Q. C. Rufus, Alexander III, 10, 4-10

“"MAKEDONKA"”

Since: Jul 08

Bitola

#20 Aug 28, 2010
Alexander phalanx had to be add in Macedonian

This clearly shows that the phalanx had to be addressed in Macedonian, if one wanted to be sure (as Ambiance certainly did) that they would understand.

And almost equally interesting - he did not address them himself, as he and other commanders normally address soldiers who understood them, nor did he sent a Greek.

The suggestion is surely that Macedonian was the language of the infantry and that Greek was a difficult, indeed a foreign language to them.

We may thus take it as certain that, when Alexander used Macedonian in addressing his guards, that too was because it was their normal language, and because (like Ambiance) he had to be sure he would be understood".

It is documented that Ambiance had experienced extreme difficulties in commanding the Macedonian soldiers.

His disability was "not only his Greek birth, as has always being realized, but the simple fact that he could not directly communicate with the Macedonian soldiers".

"His alien culture and provenance were not only obvious in an accent; it was a matter of a language".

["It was a matter of a language..."]

Since: Mar 09

Athens, Greece

#23 Aug 28, 2010
Rosetta stone wrote:
The Conquest of Greece
Quote;
PSOLETTA,

You can wallow in your IGNORANCE and STUPIDITY and leave the rest of the world to believe the FACTS and EVIDENCE, as accumulated by SERIOUS scholars and taught in the TOP UNIVERSITIES around the world.

You monkeydonkeys are TOTALLY IRRELEVANT and all you can do is FABRICATE FRAUDS and LIES and try to convince ONLY YOURSELVES that you have something to do with the Macedonians!!!

AAAAAAAAAAAhahahahahahaha!!! Macedonian NOTHINGS!

IDIOT!

“"MAKEDONKA"”

Since: Jul 08

Bitola

#24 Aug 28, 2010
Alexander demolished Thebes!!!
Quote;
The neighboring states and the cities of Greece rebelled against Macedonian rule now that they saw a boy on the throne. Alexander's council advised him to give up trying to subjugate the Greeks and to concentrate his resources on keeping the barbarian nations of the north under control. Treat the Greeks kindly, they said, and that will dissipate the first impulses of rebellion.
But Alexander rejected this advice. If any sign of weakness were perceived at the beginning of his government, everyone would be encouraged to attack, so only in bravery was there safety. First Alexander marched to the Danube and beat down all opposition from the tribes in that area. When everything there was peaceful again, he turned south and marched to Greece.
There had been a revolution in Thebes. The demagogues there were urging all of the other Greeks to join Thebes and free themselves from Macedonian domination. Athens also was being agitated by talk of war and rebellion, particularly from the demagogue Demosthenes. 6
After a march of two weeks, Alexander appeared at the walls of Thebes and demanded that the city send him the two leaders of the rebellion. To show how willing he was to forgive what was in the past, Alexander offered a full pardon for all those that would take it. The Thebans gave him an insulting reply, so Alexander killed six thousand of them, demolished their city, and sold all of the surviving inhabitants as slaves.
*** This severe example would make the other Greeks think twice about the consequences of disobedience. And soon the Athenians repented and reaffirmed their allegiance to Macedonia. Whether Alexander's new gentleness toward the Athenians was the result of remorse over the horrible cruelty done to Thebes,*** or merely that his passion for blood was satisfied, is not certain. However, from then on Alexander always showed kindness to any Theban survivor he could find.
Soon afterwards, representatives of the Greeks assembled at Corinth and named Alexander to lead them in a war against Persia. 7 While Alexander was at Corinth, politicians and philosophers came to congratulate him, but he noticed that the famous philosopher Diogenes, who lived there in Corinth, did not come.
http://www.e-classics.com/ALEXANDER.ht
AENEAD

Ireland

#25 Aug 28, 2010
Rosetta stone wrote:
Alexander phalanx had to be add in Macedonian
This clearly shows that the phalanx had to be addressed in Macedonian, if one wanted to be sure (as Ambiance certainly did) that they would understand.
And almost equally interesting - he did not address them himself, as he and other commanders normally address soldiers who understood them, nor did he sent a Greek.
The suggestion is surely that Macedonian was the language of the infantry and that Greek was a difficult, indeed a foreign language to them.
We may thus take it as certain that, when Alexander used Macedonian in addressing his guards, that too was because it was their normal language, and because (like Ambiance) he had to be sure he would be understood".
It is documented that Ambiance had experienced extreme difficulties in commanding the Macedonian soldiers.
His disability was "not only his Greek birth, as has always being realized, but the simple fact that he could not directly communicate with the Macedonian soldiers".
"His alien culture and provenance were not only obvious in an accent; it was a matter of a language".
["It was a matter of a language..."]
yes girl, phylai(Pale)in old Gaelic(Alb)is very old mec word
VETO

Athens, Greece

#26 Aug 28, 2010
Rosetta stone wrote:
Alexander demolished Thebes!!!
Quote;
The neighboring states and the cities of Greece rebelled against Macedonian rule now that they saw a boy on the throne. Alexander's council advised him to give up trying to subjugate the Greeks and to concentrate his resources on keeping the barbarian nations of the north under control. Treat the Greeks kindly, they said, and that will dissipate the first impulses of rebellion.
But Alexander rejected this advice. If any sign of weakness were perceived at the beginning of his government, everyone would be encouraged to attack, so only in bravery was there safety. First Alexander marched to the Danube and beat down all opposition from the tribes in that area. When everything there was peaceful again, he turned south and marched to Greece.
There had been a revolution in Thebes. The demagogues there were urging all of the other Greeks to join Thebes and free themselves from Macedonian domination. Athens also was being agitated by talk of war and rebellion, particularly from the demagogue Demosthenes. 6
After a march of two weeks, Alexander appeared at the walls of Thebes and demanded that the city send him the two leaders of the rebellion. To show how willing he was to forgive what was in the past, Alexander offered a full pardon for all those that would take it. The Thebans gave him an insulting reply, so Alexander killed six thousand of them, demolished their city, and sold all of the surviving inhabitants as slaves.
*** This severe example would make the other Greeks think twice about the consequences of disobedience. And soon the Athenians repented and reaffirmed their allegiance to Macedonia. Whether Alexander's new gentleness toward the Athenians was the result of remorse over the horrible cruelty done to Thebes,*** or merely that his passion for blood was satisfied, is not certain. However, from then on Alexander always showed kindness to any Theban survivor he could find.
Soon afterwards, representatives of the Greeks assembled at Corinth and named Alexander to lead them in a war against Persia. 7 While Alexander was at Corinth, politicians and philosophers came to congratulate him, but he noticed that the famous philosopher Diogenes, who lived there in Corinth, did not come.
http://www.e-classics.com/ALEXANDER.ht
The right name is MONASTIRI.Bitola is the bulgarian name of Monastiri.
AENEAD

Ireland

#27 Aug 28, 2010
from 600 AD

“Makedonia is Hellenic”

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#28 Aug 28, 2010
Rosetta stone wrote:
As Philip said it a long time ago your all HOMOS!
Greek=Hellas=Athena’s=Cretans= Corinthians=Spartans= All gays to Macedonians;
Philip II of Macedon's recorded by Plutarch demonstrates:
Quote;
Homosexuality among males in the militaries and warriors of ancient Greek city-states was documented by many historians throughout the ages. However the importance of them in establishing military formations varied. The relationships themselves were widespread as remarks of Philip II of Macedon's recorded by Plutarch demonstrates:
"It is not only the most warlike peoples, the Boeotians, Spartans, and Cretans, who are the most susceptible to this kind of love but also the greatest heroes of old: Meleager, Achilles, Aristomenes, Cimon, and Epaminondas."
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1 ...
It’s easier to tell you whom I consider Greek.
**Ancient times the city-states type of government (Athens,
Corinth, Sparta and Thebes) and those that practiced the pederastic tradition;
Eromenos
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Cite This Source
In the pederastic tradition of Classical Athens, the eromenos (Greek ἐρ&#974 ;με&#957 ;ος, pl. ἐρ&#974 ;με&#957 ;οι, "eromenoi") was an adolescent boy who was in a love relationship with an adult man, known as the erastes (ἐρ&#94 5;στ&#94 2;ς).
The term for the role often varied from one polis to another. In Athens, the eromenos was also known as the paidika; in Sparta they used aites (hearer), a term also used in Thessaly; in Crete the boys were known as kleinos (glorious) and if they had fought in battle with their lover, as parastathenes (one who stands beside).
The ideal eromenos - as well as his erastes - was expected to be ruled by the principles of enkrateia, or "self-mastery," which presumed an attitude of moderation and self-restraint in all matters.
Posting your crap again I see again you end upo looking like a farking idiot..The only people that believe in your truth of of History are your own so fark off.

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