British holidaymaker drowns at Sydney beach

Apr 5, 2010 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Guardian Unlimited

Rescuers failed to resuscitate 59-year-old man pulled from the sea at Elouera beach in city's Cronulla suburb A British man has drowned at a beach in Cronulla, southern Sydney.

Comments

Showing posts 1 - 20 of20
A person

Sweden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#1
Apr 5, 2010
 
Poor fella, no one deserves that to happen to them.
Yank Oliver

Sudbury, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2
Apr 5, 2010
 
Don't they have life guards down under???
TBA

Gymea, Australia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#3
Apr 5, 2010
 
foreigners are always drowning at our beaches. They have no concept of rips and swells which occur in oceans.
Asians are notoriously clueless when it comes to our beaches.

Poor bloke and his family.

Since: Aug 09

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#4
Apr 5, 2010
 
It is sad, there should probably be more education for tourist about our coastline and it's unseen hazards. But we get the same problem with locals who live inland and still haven't got a clue about rips eddies and rogue waves, many take no notice of lifesavers, swim outside flags and ignore the many warning signs put up to tell people of dangerous conditions in the area.

There's a real knack to surviving the surf, you go with it not fight it and get tired.
indians are turds

Australia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5
Apr 5, 2010
 

Judged:

1

1

1

who cares
TBA

Gymea, Australia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#6
Apr 5, 2010
 
indians are turds wrote:
who cares
FFs, don't you ever have anything positive or constructive to contribute? many of us are really sick of your racist nics.
Mac

Melbourne, Australia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#7
Apr 6, 2010
 
indians and africans want to take over australia that is why they keep coming and living in my street dropping price of real estate
not laughing

Melbourne, Australia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#8
Apr 6, 2010
 
Yank Oliver wrote:
Don't they have life guards down under???
don't you bother to read news items you comment on? try it then you won't be so confused.
Yank Oliver

Sudbury, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#9
Apr 6, 2010
 
not laughing wrote:
<quoted text>don't you bother to read news items you comment on? try it then you won't be so confused.
I tried to open the item but it wouldn't open that's why I asked the question about life guards.

Since: Feb 10

Auburn, Australia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#10
Apr 6, 2010
 
Yank Oliver wrote:
<quoted text>
I tried to open the item but it wouldn't open that's why I asked the question about life guards.
"Attempts by lifesavers to resuscitate him failed, although his wife was rescued."

Australia's first official surf lifesaving club - the first in the world (another first!)- was founded at Bondi Beach in 1906.

The things you don't know about Australia would fill a book.
Yank Oliver

Sudbury, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#12
Apr 6, 2010
 
Tiger7 wrote:
<quoted text>
"Attempts by lifesavers to resuscitate him failed, although his wife was rescued."
Australia's first official surf lifesaving club - the first in the world (another first!)- was founded at Bondi Beach in 1906.
The things you don't know about Australia would fill a book.
I guess they were there but not doing their jobs or the pommy would still be alive.

Since: Feb 10

Auburn, Australia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#13
Apr 6, 2010
 
Yank Oliver wrote:
<quoted text>
I guess they were there but not doing their jobs or the pommy would still be alive.
It's obvious that you know nothing about Australian beaches either.

Australian surf lifesavers have rescued more than 500,000 people in the 80 years since records have been kept, with the number of rescues each season in recent years fluctuating between 8,000 and 10,000.

They would even rescue you.
Yank Oliver

Sudbury, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#14
Apr 6, 2010
 
Tiger7 wrote:
<quoted text>
It's obvious that you know nothing about Australian beaches either.
Australian surf lifesavers have rescued more than 500,000 people in the 80 years since records have been kept, with the number of rescues each season in recent years fluctuating between 8,000 and 10,000.
They would even rescue you.
Sounds like they'd rescue anyone but the poor pom. The pom is dead nuff said.

“No carbon dioxide tax”

Since: Feb 10

bullet-proof tiger

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#15
Apr 6, 2010
 
you are not welcome here
Yank Oliver

Sudbury, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#16
Apr 6, 2010
 
SupaAussie wrote:
you are not welcome here
Out in the sun without a hat again?
Mr Right

Manchester, UK

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#17
Apr 6, 2010
 

Judged:

1

It proves inaccurate details are frequent when articles are published so soon after the event, since it states "his wife was rescued" ...well i want to know how many wives this poor person has when she was in britain..
Australian

Perth, Australia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#18
Apr 6, 2010
 
Palawa wrote:
It is sad, there should probably be more education for tourist about our coastline and it's unseen hazards. But we get the same problem with locals who live inland and still haven't got a clue about rips eddies and rogue waves, many take no notice of lifesavers, swim outside flags and ignore the many warning signs put up to tell people of dangerous conditions in the area.
There's a real knack to surviving the surf, you go with it not fight it and get tired.
now they want you to swim side ways but I think going with it is better. Just from experience

Since: Feb 10

Auburn, Australia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#19
Apr 6, 2010
 
Yank Oliver wrote:
<quoted text>
Sounds like they'd rescue anyone but the poor pom. The pom is dead nuff said.
A few people die each year on Australian beaches. Most are rescued - like the guy's wife.

Can't save 'em all.

Since: Aug 09

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#20
Apr 6, 2010
 
Australian wrote:
<quoted text>
now they want you to swim side ways but I think going with it is better. Just from experience
You do swim sort of sideways, but if the rips really strong, you go with it outside the break where it dissipates. Then ride a wave in to the spot which has no rip, which is pretty easy to work out.

People just don't take the time to observe what the sea is doing, they just see what looks nice and jump in. But most of the danger lies just below the surface with suck back and rip gullies.
Yank Oliver

Sudbury, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#21
Apr 7, 2010
 
Tiger7 wrote:
<quoted text>
A few people die each year on Australian beaches. Most are rescued - like the guy's wife.
Can't save 'em all.
See the comment from Mr. Right.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Showing posts 1 - 20 of20
Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Other Recent New South Wales, Australia Travel Discussions

Search the New South Wales, Australia Travel Forum:
Topic Updated Last By Comments
Your Weekly Travel Zen: Australia Jan '14 Reg 1
Australia pledges better protection for Indian ... (Jun '09) Sep '13 paris 149
Aboriginal men sue Qantas after being kicked of... (Apr '13) Aug '13 Qantasexemployee 8
Six adventurers win Australia tourism dream jobs (Jun '13) Jun '13 tim 1
As Australia heatwave hits new high, warning th... (Jan '13) Jan '13 Anonymous 1
Seal Rocks House is a Net Zero Energy Surfer's ... (Aug '12) Aug '12 Elias 1
Australia's mining boom may doom Barrier... (Jul '12) Jul '12 Anonymous 4
•••
•••
•••
•••