Roman Catholic church only true church, says Vatican

There are 20 comments on the CBC News story from Jul 10, 2007, titled Roman Catholic church only true church, says Vatican. In it, CBC News reports that:

The VaticanA issued a document Tuesday restatingA its belief that the Roman Catholic Church is the only true church of Jesus Christ.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at CBC News.

“GOD SO LOVED US”

Since: Aug 08

He Gave His SON to Save us

#497661 Dec 5, 2013
StarC wrote:
Have a peaceful night all.
Rose I'll be waiting for the verse that says Jesus will return to "The New Jerusalem"
Revelation 21
A,new, heaven. A,New, earth ..And ,New Jerusalem

Co.ing out of heaven...Jesus,will dwell among His People,

Nowhere,does it say He is,returning to a,Roman temple,

“GOD SO LOVED US”

Since: Aug 08

He Gave His SON to Save us

#497662 Dec 5, 2013
On a,New,Earth ..Will there even be a Rome,..!!!

I'm not kidding ..all those treasures may be gone ..destroyed ...along with most man made everything !!!

Crystal Cathedral..Too ...every man made,icon turned to dust ...during the,tribulation or by Christ ..

No wonder they want land,in Jerusalem ..
marge

Ames, IA

#497663 Dec 5, 2013
RoSesz wrote:
<quoted text>
Very interesting site ...interest ing perspective on the,EARLY FATHERS..And,hat they wrote
It seems it was against us born-agains which is what I'd been saying all along we were there then.
marge

Ames, IA

#497664 Dec 5, 2013
RoSesz wrote:
<quoted text>
Very interesting site ...interest ing perspective on the,EARLY FATHERS..And,hat they wrote
from the article,

The doctrine also asserts that during the last supper where Jesus instituted the memorial of His passion, the bread, after being blessed by Jesus, became His literal glorified body. One major problem with this; Jesus was not yet glorified when he shared the Passover meal with His disciples. Proof of that is found explicitly in two places, John 7:39 and 17: 5. The doctrine makes no sense today, and it made no sense 2000 years ago, and the idea was unheard of in the early church.
marge

Ames, IA

#497665 Dec 5, 2013
"So in other words, they have been protesting us since the beginning."

Yep!
Dust Storm

Minneapolis, MN

#497666 Dec 5, 2013
RoSesz wrote:
<quoted text>
Very interesting site ...interest ing perspective on the,EARLY FATHERS..And,hat they wrote
It probably is for short sighted, ignorant and rabid anti-catholics like yourself who goes about bellowing all kinds of nonsense and is quick to absorb the latest tabloid headline. Now I wouldnt expect you to actually read and try to absorb the other side of the story with any depth or intellectual capacity, nevertheless I will put it forth. If you spent half the time you do looking for any rubbish and posting it with your shallow understanding then actually reviewing their works as a whole then you might learn something and it will not bode well for the Protestant view.

For a short balanced treatment of the Fathers on the Eucharist, I would suggest the classic non-Catholic work Early Christian Doctrines by JND Kelly (chapter 8 for the ante-Nicene, and chapter 16 for the post-Nicene Fathers), which Webster does refer to in his endnotes, although Kelly contradicts Webster at a number of points. For an exhaustive study, the older two-volume work A History of the Doctrine of the Holy Eucharist by the Anglo-Catholic scholar Darwell Stone is available through inter-library loan. A third important work by a Jesuit scholar is titled Eucharistic Sacrifice and the Reformation (1960) by Francis Clark which shows in great detail the errors and misunderstandings of Protestants concerning the Eucharist in the sixteenth century and the consistency of the Catholic belief by the great Fathers and Doctors of the Church.

----------

For the views of the early Church Fathers before St. Augustine

This is My Body: Eucharist in the Early Fathers

For a study of the "symbolical" language and "allegorical" interpretations of

Tertullian, St. Cyprian of Carthage, Origen and St. Clement of Alexandria

For a study and explanation of the complex view of

St. Augustine on the Eucharist

http://www.philvaz.com/apologetics/num34.htm
OldJG

Rockford, IL

#497667 Dec 5, 2013
Dust Storm wrote:
<quoted text>
It probably is for short sighted, ignorant and rabid anti-catholics like yourself who goes about bellowing all kinds of nonsense and is quick to absorb the latest tabloid headline. Now I wouldnt expect you to actually read and try to absorb the other side of the story with any depth or intellectual capacity, nevertheless I will put it forth. If you spent half the time you do looking for any rubbish and posting it with your shallow understanding then actually reviewing their works as a whole then you might learn something and it will not bode well for the Protestant view.
For a short balanced treatment of the Fathers on the Eucharist, I would suggest the classic non-Catholic work Early Christian Doctrines by JND Kelly (chapter 8 for the ante-Nicene, and chapter 16 for the post-Nicene Fathers), which Webster does refer to in his endnotes, although Kelly contradicts Webster at a number of points. For an exhaustive study, the older two-volume work A History of the Doctrine of the Holy Eucharist by the Anglo-Catholic scholar Darwell Stone is available through inter-library loan. A third important work by a Jesuit scholar is titled Eucharistic Sacrifice and the Reformation (1960) by Francis Clark which shows in great detail the errors and misunderstandings of Protestants concerning the Eucharist in the sixteenth century and the consistency of the Catholic belief by the great Fathers and Doctors of the Church.
----------
For the views of the early Church Fathers before St. Augustine
This is My Body: Eucharist in the Early Fathers
For a study of the "symbolical" language and "allegorical" interpretations of
Tertullian, St. Cyprian of Carthage, Origen and St. Clement of Alexandria
For a study and explanation of the complex view of
St. Augustine on the Eucharist
http://www.philvaz.com/apologetics/num34.htm
Give this a try...
What did the early church fathers say about "transubstantiation" ?

http://onefold.wordpress.com/early-church-evi ...

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#497668 Dec 5, 2013
StarC wrote:
"The Church Is One (Rom. 12:5, 1 Cor. 10:17, 12:13, CCC 813–822)
Jesus established only one Church, not a collection of differing churches (Lutheran, Baptist, Anglican, and so on). The Bible says the Church is the bride of Christ (Eph. 5:23–32). Jesus can have but one spouse, and his spouse is the Catholic Church.
His Church also teaches just one set of doctrines, which must be the same as those taught by the apostles (Jude 3). This is the unity of belief to which Scripture calls us (Phil. 1:27, 2:2).
Although some Catholics dissent from officially-taught doctrines, the Church’s official
teachers—the pope and the bishops united with him—have never changed any
doctrine. Over the centuries, as doctrines are examined more fully, the Church comes
to understand them more deeply (John 16:12–13), but it never understands them to
mean the opposite of what they once meant.
The Church Is Holy (Eph. 5:25–27, Rev. 19:7–8, CCC 823–829)
By his grace Jesus makes the Church holy, just as he is holy. This doesn’t mean that each member is always holy. Jesus said there would be both good and bad members in the Church (John 6:70), and not all the members would go to heaven (Matt. 7:21–23).
But the Church itself is holy because it is the source of holiness and is the guardian of the special means of grace Jesus established, the sacraments (cf. Eph. 5:26).
The Church Is Catholic (Matt. 28:19–20, Rev. 5:9–10, CCC 830–856)
Jesus’ Church is called catholic ("universal" in Greek) because it is his gift to all people.
He told his apostles to go throughout the world and make disciples of "all nations"
(Matt. 28:19–20).
For 2,000 years the Catholic Church has carried out this mission, preaching the good news that Christ died for all men and that he wants all of us to be members of his universal family (Gal. 3:28).
Nowadays the Catholic Church is found in every country of the world and is still sending out missionaries to "make disciples of all nations" (Matt. 28:19).
The Church Jesus established was known by its most common title, "the Catholic Church," at least as early as the year 107, when Ignatius of Antioch used that title to describe the one Church Jesus founded. The title apparently was old in Ignatius’s time, which means it probably went all the way back to the time of the apostles."
Hogwash!!!!!

Why did not Christ referred to the Catholic Church in Rev????? Did He forget He established it????

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#497669 Dec 5, 2013
Working for the Lord wrote:
<quoted text> Romans 16;16, 16 Salute one another with an holy kiss. The churches of Christ salute you. Matthew 16;18 The church Jesus built Matthew 16;18, 18 And I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. God never forgot the only church that Jesus built, on the contrary God opened the doors in 33 AD on the day of Pentecost, when Peter was preaching just after the Apostles received the Holy Spirit that would allow them to perform miracles God added 3,000 souls that were saved from doing what Peter had told them to. The Church of Christ is the only church of the bible, and that makes it imperative that when attending church that you go to the Church of Christ, as this is the only church that worships in spirit and in truth. I urge you to go to the nearest Church of Christ and study and then get baptized and know that your home is heaven. If you can prove the CoC not the church of the bible I urge you to prove me wrong, because what ever church you currently attend it is a man made church and has done nothing for you but left you lost.
Why are you not answering me??? Quote: Why did not Christ refer to the Church of Christ in Rev??? Did He forget it existed??? No one told Him it existed???
OldJG

Rockford, IL

#497670 Dec 5, 2013
Dust Storm wrote:
<quoted text>
It probably is for short sighted, ignorant and rabid anti-catholics like yourself who goes about bellowing all kinds of nonsense and is quick to absorb the latest tabloid headline. Now I wouldnt expect you to actually read and try to absorb the other side of the story with any depth or intellectual capacity, nevertheless I will put it forth. If you spent half the time you do looking for any rubbish and posting it with your shallow understanding then actually reviewing their works as a whole then you might learn something and it will not bode well for the Protestant view.
For a short balanced treatment of the Fathers on the Eucharist, I would suggest the classic non-Catholic work Early Christian Doctrines by JND Kelly (chapter 8 for the ante-Nicene, and chapter 16 for the post-Nicene Fathers), which Webster does refer to in his endnotes, although Kelly contradicts Webster at a number of points. For an exhaustive study, the older two-volume work A History of the Doctrine of the Holy Eucharist by the Anglo-Catholic scholar Darwell Stone is available through inter-library loan. A third important work by a Jesuit scholar is titled Eucharistic Sacrifice and the Reformation (1960) by Francis Clark which shows in great detail the errors and misunderstandings of Protestants concerning the Eucharist in the sixteenth century and the consistency of the Catholic belief by the great Fathers and Doctors of the Church.
----------
For the views of the early Church Fathers before St. Augustine
This is My Body: Eucharist in the Early Fathers
For a study of the "symbolical" language and "allegorical" interpretations of
Tertullian, St. Cyprian of Carthage, Origen and St. Clement of Alexandria
For a study and explanation of the complex view of
St. Augustine on the Eucharist
http://www.philvaz.com/apologetics/num34.htm
Be aware that Kelly himself is an orthodox Anglo-Catholic.

http://vintage.aomin.org/1296CATR.html

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#497671 Dec 5, 2013
Why do I, an SBC member fully embrace the Truthin the Catholic NABre Bible, and Catholics do not!!!!!

Quote: Church: this word (Greek ekkl&#275;sia) occurs in the gospels only here and in Mt 18:17 (twice). There are several possibilities for an Aramaic original. Jesus’ church means the community that he will gather and that, like a building, will have Peter as its solid foundation. That function of Peter consists in his being witness to Jesus as the Messiah, the Son of the living God. The gates of the netherworld shall not prevail against it: the netherworld (Greek Had&#275;s, the abode of the dead) is conceived of as a walled city whose gates will not close in upon the church of Jesus, i.e., it will not be overcome by the power of death.
Dust Storm

Minneapolis, MN

#497672 Dec 5, 2013
OldJG wrote:
<quoted text>
Give this a try...
What did the early church fathers say about "transubstantiation" ?
http://onefold.wordpress.com/early-church-evi ...
Yawn...Every Protestant who has tried to use the Early Fathers has been laid to waste by Catholic Scholars. You have to take their works as a whole in context not distort it which is done by your latest drivel festival. Trying to misrepresent them wont help those who seek the reality. I think you would be better off with the old argument it doesnt matter what the Early Fathers said and insert your personal truth of what scripture says from some modern day preacher with your own twist of course. Sigh..
OldJG

Rockford, IL

#497673 Dec 5, 2013
Dust Storm...

These early church fathers contradict your contention regarding "transubstantiation" . These are the very early church fathers the Romans on this forum quote.

http://onefold.wordpress.com/early-church-evi ...

Clement of Alexandria
Clement of Alexandria flourished at the close of the second century when he succeeded Pantaenus in the catechetical school of Alexandria. It is believed by some that Clement compiled his “stramata”(miscellaneous writings) about the time he was 40 years old. If true, he would have been born while Justin Martyr and Irenaeus were still writing, and while Polycarp was still alive. As a teacher of Christian philosophy, Clement instructed Origen who wrote during the mid third century.

Tertullian of Carthage
Tertullian was from Carthage, a city located near modern day Tunis Tunisia in Northern Africa. During Tertullian’s time, the culture of Carthage was distinctly Roman. The Christian church there was likely under the jurisdiction of the church in Rome because of its close proximity. The western churches during Tertullian’s day were inconsiderable next to the chief churches of Antioch and Alexandria where Clement resided. But Tertullian exemplifies the same passion, intelligence, and dedication as his eastern brother Clement did, but with a bit more bluntness and attitude. When one reads Tertullian’s work, one can appreciate the struggles of the early church, particularly with regards to living under constant threats from the pagan government.

Irenaeus of Lyons
Irenaeus was the bishop of Lyons France (Gaul) in the mid second century. He wrote his Against Heresies around 180 A.D. an invaluable work that details Gnostic practices and beliefs and furthermore soundly and biblically refutes them. In addition to Against Heresies, there are several fragments extant that mostly come from Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History.

Justin Martyr
(Justin the Martyr, also known as Justin of Caesarea)(100 – 165)
Of Justin’s extant writings, three are referenced here: the first and second portions of his apology written to Emperor Antoninus (138-161), referenced as first apology and second apology, and Justin’s Dialog with Trypho the Jew.

Ignatius of Antioch
Ignatius of Antioch wrote seven letters that are extant. The situation Ignatius was in while composing his seven epistles is unique to say the least. Showing his love for Christ and His church, Ignatius selflessly and voluntarily presented himself before the Emperor Trajan as a Christian bishop and was subsequently charged and condemned to death by wild beasts.
OldJG

Rockford, IL

#497674 Dec 5, 2013
This is an awesome site. Check it out.

http://onefold.wordpress.com/
OldJG

Rockford, IL

#497675 Dec 5, 2013
Dust Storm wrote:
<quoted text>
Yawn...Every Protestant who has tried to use the Early Fathers has been laid to waste by Catholic Scholars. You have to take their works as a whole in context not distort it which is done by your latest drivel festival. Trying to misrepresent them wont help those who seek the reality. I think you would be better off with the old argument it doesnt matter what the Early Fathers said and insert your personal truth of what scripture says from some modern day preacher with your own twist of course. Sigh..
When confronted with the truth you deny the very truth you have attempted to push down the throat of true believers. Now, according to you, these early church fathers did not say what is actually in print because it contradicts everything you believe in.

Try this site..........http://onefold.w ordpress.com/

It will explain much to you and hopefully the blinders on your eyes, the plugs in your ears and the hardness of your heart will fall away.
OldJG

Rockford, IL

#497676 Dec 5, 2013
Dust Storm wrote:
<quoted text>
Yawn...Every Protestant who has tried to use the Early Fathers has been laid to waste by Catholic Scholars. You have to take their works as a whole in context not distort it which is done by your latest drivel festival. Trying to misrepresent them wont help those who seek the reality. I think you would be better off with the old argument it doesnt matter what the Early Fathers said and insert your personal truth of what scripture says from some modern day preacher with your own twist of course. Sigh..
When confronted with the truth you deny the very truth you have attempted to push down the throat of true believers. Now, according to you, these early church fathers did not say what is actually in print because it contradicts everything you believe in.

Try this site..........http://onefold.w ordpress.com/

It will explain much to you and hopefully the blinder
Dust Storm

Minneapolis, MN

#497677 Dec 5, 2013
OldJG wrote:
Dust Storm...
These early church fathers contradict your contention regarding "transubstantiation" . These are the very early church fathers the Romans on this forum quote.
http://onefold.wordpress.com/early-church-evi ...
Clement of Alexandria
Clement of Alexandria flourished at the close of the second century when he succeeded Pantaenus in the catechetical school of Alexandria. It is believed by some that Clement compiled his “stramata”(miscellaneous writings) about the time he was 40 years old. If true, he would have been born while Justin Martyr and Irenaeus were still writing, and while Polycarp was still alive. As a teacher of Christian philosophy, Clement instructed Origen who wrote during the mid third century.
Tertullian of Carthage
Tertullian was from Carthage, a city located near modern day Tunis Tunisia in Northern Africa. During Tertullian’s time, the culture of Carthage was distinctly Roman. The Christian church there was likely under the jurisdiction of the church in Rome because of its close proximity. The western churches during Tertullian’s day were inconsiderable next to the chief churches of Antioch and Alexandria where Clement resided. But Tertullian exemplifies the same passion, intelligence, and dedication as his eastern brother Clement did, but with a bit more bluntness and attitude. When one reads Tertullian’s work, one can appreciate the struggles of the early church, particularly with regards to living under constant threats from the pagan government.
Irenaeus of Lyons
Irenaeus was the bishop of Lyons France (Gaul) in the mid second century. He wrote his Against Heresies around 180 A.D. an invaluable work that details Gnostic practices and beliefs and furthermore soundly and biblically refutes them. In addition to Against Heresies, there are several fragments extant that mostly come from Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History.
Justin Martyr
(Justin the Martyr, also known as Justin of Caesarea)(100 – 165)
Of Justin’s extant writings, three are referenced here: the first and second portions of his apology written to Emperor Antoninus (138-161), referenced as first apology and second apology, and Justin’s Dialog with Trypho the Jew.
Ignatius of Antioch
Ignatius of Antioch wrote seven letters that are extant. The situation Ignatius was in while composing his seven epistles is unique to say the least. Showing his love for Christ and His church, Ignatius selflessly and voluntarily presented himself before the Emperor Trajan as a Christian bishop and was subsequently charged and condemned to death by wild beasts.
No they dont and I gave a link. Webster, White, and every other Protestant minion has been utterly destroyed by Catholic Scholars trying to misuse the Fathers

As for White yes he does love to quote JND Kelley and Kelly is an Anglican Historian A PROTESTANT. So if you want to use White to try to say he is a Catholic like the idiot Preston maybe you have finally found something stupid you can both believe in. White Calls him the greatest Patristic Scholar many times, too bad for him Kelly doesnt agree with much of anything he says. lol

Protestant Church Historians & Patristics Experts Schaff, Kelly, & Pelikan Get James White's Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval
http://socrates58.blogspot.com/2007/10/protes...
marge

Ames, IA

#497678 Dec 5, 2013
Dust Storm wrote:
<quoted text>
Yawn...Every Protestant who has tried to use the Early Fathers has been laid to waste by Catholic Scholars. You have to take their works as a whole in context not distort it which is done by your latest drivel festival. Trying to misrepresent them wont help those who seek the reality. I think you would be better off with the old argument it doesnt matter what the Early Fathers said and insert your personal truth of what scripture says from some modern day preacher with your own twist of course. Sigh..
The beauty of Scripture is the Truth it says all by itself, you will never be able to refute what it says with words from man, and only those born-anew through that Word which is Jesus can decipher it and say yeah to it.

You can't see anything until Jesus forgives your sins and God places His Spirit inside of you so that you are forgiven, only then can you preach Jesus.
OldJG

Rockford, IL

#497679 Dec 5, 2013
Dust Storm wrote:
<quoted text>
Yawn...Every Protestant who has tried to use the Early Fathers has been laid to waste by Catholic Scholars. You have to take their works as a whole in context not distort it which is done by your latest drivel festival. Trying to misrepresent them wont help those who seek the reality. I think you would be better off with the old argument it doesnt matter what the Early Fathers said and insert your personal truth of what scripture says from some modern day preacher with your own twist of course. Sigh..
When confronted with the truth you deny the very truth you have attempted to push down the throat of true believers. Now, according to you, these early church fathers did not say what is actually in print because it contradicts everything you believe in.

Try this site......... http://onefold.wordpress.com/

It will explain much to you and hopefully the blinder
OldJG

Rockford, IL

#497680 Dec 5, 2013
Dust Storm wrote:
<quoted text>
Yawn...Every Protestant who has tried to use the Early Fathers has been laid to waste by Catholic Scholars. You have to take their works as a whole in context not distort it which is done by your latest drivel festival. Trying to misrepresent them wont help those who seek the reality. I think you would be better off with the old argument it doesnt matter what the Early Fathers said and insert your personal truth of what scripture says from some modern day preacher with your own twist of course. Sigh..
Do these names ring a bell?

These early church fathers contradict your contention regarding "transubstantiation" . These are the very early church fathers the Romans on this forum quote.

http://onefold.wordpress.com/early-church-evi ...

Clement of Alexandria
Clement of Alexandria flourished at the close of the second century when he succeeded Pantaenus in the catechetical school of Alexandria. It is believed by some that Clement compiled his “stramata”(miscellaneous writings) about the time he was 40 years old. If true, he would have been born while Justin Martyr and Irenaeus were still writing, and while Polycarp was still alive. As a teacher of Christian philosophy, Clement instructed Origen who wrote during the mid third century.

Tertullian of Carthage
Tertullian was from Carthage, a city located near modern day Tunis Tunisia in Northern Africa. During Tertullian’s time, the culture of Carthage was distinctly Roman. The Christian church there was likely under the jurisdiction of the church in Rome because of its close proximity. The western churches during Tertullian’s day were inconsiderable next to the chief churches of Antioch and Alexandria where Clement resided. But Tertullian exemplifies the same passion, intelligence, and dedication as his eastern brother Clement did, but with a bit more bluntness and attitude. When one reads Tertullian’s work, one can appreciate the struggles of the early church, particularly with regards to living under constant threats from the pagan government.

Irenaeus of Lyons
Irenaeus was the bishop of Lyons France (Gaul) in the mid second century. He wrote his Against Heresies around 180 A.D. an invaluable work that details Gnostic practices and beliefs and furthermore soundly and biblically refutes them. In addition to Against Heresies, there are several fragments extant that mostly come from Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History.

Justin Martyr
(Justin the Martyr, also known as Justin of Caesarea)(100 – 165)
Of Justin’s extant writings, three are referenced here: the first and second portions of his apology written to Emperor Antoninus (138-161), referenced as first apology and second apology, and Justin’s Dialog with Trypho the Jew.

Ignatius of Antioch
Ignatius of Antioch wrote seven letters that are extant. The situation Ignatius was in while composing his seven epistles is unique to say the least. Showing his love for Christ and His church, Ignatius selflessly and voluntarily presented himself before the Emperor Trajan as a Christian bishop and was subsequently charged and condemned to death by wild beasts.

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