Roman Catholic church only true churc...

Roman Catholic church only true church, says Vatican

There are 654178 comments on the CBC News story from Jul 10, 2007, titled Roman Catholic church only true church, says Vatican. In it, CBC News reports that:

The VaticanA issued a document Tuesday restatingA its belief that the Roman Catholic Church is the only true church of Jesus Christ.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at CBC News.

“cdesign proponentsists”

Since: Jul 09

Pittsburgh, PA

#397562 Oct 20, 2012
7th Day Catholics Rock wrote:
<quoted text>Christ being the resurrection and life had to die in order to change the Old Covenant or Law of the King in other words. If he had not done so mankind would be forever be subjected to death and without mercy. By the Grace of God and Christ's death and resurrection and his mercy based on his promises that by faith and trusting in him he made a New Covenant in which he is the mediater of and will write his law in our hearts to where we can keep them, when we also are raised incorruptible at the resurrection of his coming.
Seek Christ and he will reveal his will to you wiht spiritual discernment and not that of the carnal nature of the mortal man.
What does that tell you? A god that knows all, see all, planned all, never changing, has changed his plan at least twice. Again, what does that tell you?

He failed with 1/3 of the angels and all but 8 humans {really 7 if you know about Ham}. So, he sent himself to Earth, to have himself killed, to appease himself.

Does that give you a clue?

If you only read what you are guided to read, you will never break free.

“Game Over”

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#397563 Oct 20, 2012
7th Day Catholics Rock wrote:
<quoted text>Christ being the resurrection and life had to die in order to change the Old Covenant or Law of the King in other words. If he had not done so mankind would be forever be subjected to death and without mercy. By the Grace of God and Christ's death and resurrection and his mercy based on his promises that by faith and trusting in him he made a New Covenant in which he is the mediater of and will write his law in our hearts to where we can keep them, when we also are raised incorruptible at the resurrection of his coming.
Seek Christ and he will reveal his will to you wiht spiritual discernment and not that of the carnal nature of the mortal man.
So, in other words, he's dead.

Sounds like a ghost story to me.

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#397564 Oct 20, 2012
There are many other scriptures that could have been used here to testify against the doctrines of the catholic religion. There are also many other doctrines of the catholic religion which could have been refuted (e.g. the sacraments, receiving the Holy Ghost, salvation through the catholic religion, penance, rosary, etc.).
****

The Catholic religion has a history of taking the money of poor widows in order to say masses for the dead (which do no good) and collecting the material possessions of nuns. In Italy, the heart of Roman Catholicism, as I understand it, there is a saying that goes, "Without money, they don't sing the mass." That trickery is evil on a number of fronts--1) the mass is blasphemous and dishonours the finished work of Christ 2) people who trust in the mass waste their money and go to hell 3) their survivors waste their money and possessions having masses said for the dead 4) the survivors go to hell and then their survivors pay for masses...the costumed curia have subverted whole houses for centuries on end collecting wealth for the coffers of the Roman Catholic institution 5) the doctrine of purgatory is a heresy because there is no such thing as purgatory--it is not in the Bible (the apocrypha is not part of the Bible, it is a collection of spurious books); and, 6) they blaspheme God when they put a monetary price on the gift of God because the Bible teaches that the gift of God is without price. Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved. No money, penance, "indulgence," masses, etc. are required--or accepted. No one will ever buy their way into heaven or enter heaven according to their own religious path that they choose to follow outside of the Bible or work their way into heaven by doing "good deeds"--all our righteousnesses are as filthy rags--

Isaiah 64:6 But we are all as an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses are as filthy rags; and we all do fade as a leaf; and our iniquities, like the wind, have taken us away.
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397565 Oct 20, 2012
TheBlackSheep wrote:
<quoted text>
What does that tell you? A god that knows all, see all, planned all, never changing, has changed his plan at least twice. Again, what does that tell you?
He failed with 1/3 of the angels and all but 8 humans {really 7 if you know about Ham}. So, he sent himself to Earth, to have himself killed, to appease himself.
Does that give you a clue?
If you only read what you are guided to read, you will never break free.
This secret footage took my BREATH AWAY!- Smuggled out at GREAT RISK!!!

&fe ature=related

Enjoy
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397566 Oct 20, 2012
River Tam wrote:
<quoted text>
So, in other words, he's dead.
Sounds like a ghost story to me.
A Real Picture of God In Space

“Game Over”

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#397567 Oct 20, 2012
7th Day Catholics Rock wrote:
<quoted text>
A Real Picture of God In Space
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =u-lTTdyDuWMXX
A real picture of Uranus.

http://www.youtube.com/watch...
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397568 Oct 20, 2012
The Ministries and Deaths of the Apostles

Legends concerning the ministries and deaths of Christ's apostles abound, but there is little Scriptural information of such. Therefore, what the apostles did in their later years and how they died may be regarded as quite uncertain. Despite some severe persecutions, it appears that the apostles remained in Jerusalem until at least the time of the Jerusalem conference in 50 A.D.(Acts 8:1; 15:6). James, the brother of John, had been put to death by King Agrippa I in 44 A.D.(Acts 12:1, 2). Aside from Peter, John, Jude (vs. 1), and Paul, none of the apostles is mentioned by name after 50 A.D. However, there are a few indications that the original apostles, especially Peter and John, eventually traveled and labored outside Judea.(1) Firstly, they were under instructions from Christ to go into all the world (Matt. 28:19; Mk. 16:15).(2) When Paul returned to Jerusalem for the last time in 58 A.D., mention is made of him meeting with the elders only (Acts 21:17,18)- an indication that the apostles were away from Jerusalem.(3) There are implications or plain statements to the effect that the original apostles, especially Peter and John, did carry their ministries beyond Judea (I Cor. 1:12; 9:5; I Pet. 1:1; 5:13; Rev. 1:9). It is a controversial matter whether or not Peter became the bishop of the church in Rome, as Roman Catholicism claims, but there is no sure evidence that he ever entered that city. Tradition has Peter put to death in Rome about 64 A.D. by being crucified upside down (that position being requested by him supposedly because of a feeling of unworthiness to be crucified just as his Lord was). It is noteworthy that Christ did predict a martyr's death for Peter (Jn. 21:18,19). It is thought that Paul was beheaded right outside Rome in 68 A.D.(II Tim. 4: 6-8,16-18). John supposedly lived and labored in Ephesus during his later years, being the only apostle allowed to die a natural death. The lives, ministries, and deaths of the rest of the apostles are far more unknown..

http://www.bible.ca/history/eubanks/history-e...
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397569 Oct 20, 2012
The Spread and Development of the Church

The church grew vigorously during its early years. Thousands upon thousands of Jews were brought to Christ as the gospel was preached within Judea (Acts 2:41; 4:4; 6:7). This pattern of rapid growth continued as the church made its way among the Gentile nations (Acts 16:5). Paul was highly instrumental in getting the gospel to the Gentiles and Jews of Asia Minor, Macedonia, and Achaia. However, he was not entirely alone in this effort. A strong church was already well established in Rome when he arrived in that city, and before Paul's death Peter is able to write to Christians scattered throughout the northern and western sections of Asia Minor, regions of which there is no record of Paul having visited. Paul did say he preached the gospel as far as Illyricum (northwest of Macedonia) and had aspirations of going to Spain (Rom. 15:19,24). There is no record of Paul evangelizing the island of Crete, but in his waning years it was needful for him to leave Titus there with instructions to appoint elders in every city (Tit. 1:5). At the very end of his life he mentions that Titus had gone to Dalmatia (II Tim. 4:10). Indeed, while writing the Colossian brethren from Rome as a prisoner (61-63 A.D.), he feels justified in saying that the gospel had been preached "in all creation under heaven" (Col. 1:23). There is no reason to believe that this rapid growth did not continue in the last few decades of the First Century, for early Christians were zealously evangelistic. As a matter of fact, when John wrote his Revelation (95 A.D.) there were at least ten known churches in the province of Asia alone.

However, dark, foreboding clouds lay on the horizon. The latest writings of the New Testament (John's books) seem to confirm the existence of the apostasies that Paul prophesied (Acts 20:29, I Tim. 4:1-3; II Tim. 3:1-9; 4:3, 4). Men did arise to usurp preeminence and authority over God's people (III Jn. 9,10), and by the end of the First Century only two of the seven churches mentioned in John's Revelation are in very good spiritual condition (Rev. 2,3). Even the mediocre ones had problems with false teachers and immorality in their midst (Rev. 2:14,15 , 20-24). It is probable that the conditions which prevailed among the Asian churches were typical of all the churches at the end of the First Century. John's writings seem designed to combat incipient heresies concerning the nature of Christ. "Antichrists" had already arrived on the scene prior to his death (I Jn. 2:18; 4:3; II Jn. 7). Such were to constitute major enemies of the cause of Christ in the years to come.

http://www.bible.ca/history/eubanks/history-e...
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397570 Oct 20, 2012
Relations with Judaism and the Roman Government

Although relations between Christians and the unbelieving Jews appear to have been cordial at first (Acts 2:47), the unbelieving Jewish leadership, unable to co-exist peaceably with the preaching of the gospel of Jesus Christ, instigated severe persecutions against Christians. These persecutions continued until the destruction of Jerusalem and eventually became generalized enough to build up in the common Jewish mind a prejudice and hostility toward the church.

The relations of the church with the Roman government were likewise initially favorable. The church was viewed by the Romans in the early years as a branch of Judaism. However, the attacks of the Jewish community upon the church, as well as the distinctive doctrines and practices of the latter, soon clarified things. Nevertheless, Christians did not become the targets of Roman persecution until Nero cast the blame upon them for the catastrophe fire which burned much of Rome in 64 A.D. Consequently, they were subjected to the most horrid deaths. However, the Neronian persecution seems to have been brief and local. It was not until the reign of Domitian (81-96 A.D.) that a general persecution of Christians by the Roman government broke out. From then on such persecutions continued intermittently until the reign of the emperor Constantine in the early Fourth Century A.D. Though prejudice caused by misrepresentations and misunderstandings prevailed among the common people, the hostility of the Roman government was basically political in nature. Because Christians refused to burn incense to the deified Roman emperor, an act which the Romans viewed as an expression of loyalty and patriotism but which Christians viewed as idolatry, they were regarded as treasonous and worthy of death. John's Revelation was written to reassure Christians caught up in the persecutions of Domitian.
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397571 Oct 20, 2012
The Completion of the New Testament

Of course, as the apostles began to disappear from the earthly scene, miraculous powers among Christians began to fade away with them (I Cor. 13:8-10). However, in their place was left something equally effective: the New Testament. The books constituting the New Testament were penned by eight inspired men, especially Paul. All but John's writings are believed by conservative scholars to have been written 50-70 A.D. prior to the destruction of Jerusalem. John's books are believed to have been written in the last decade of the First Century (95-98 A.D.). The New Testament serves as an infallible, all-sufficient, incorruptible, indestructible guide for the Christian (II Tim. 3:16,17; I Pet. 1:23-25).

No Catholic Church
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397572 Oct 20, 2012
Introduction

With this lesson the student of church history embarks upon a study of that long, dark process of apostasy which eventually culminated in the Roman Catholic Church. This apostasy unfolded very gradually.(Apostasies that move forward too rapidly are ordinarily too obvious and alarming to achieve much success.) Even in the days of the apostles there were signs that the church was moving in the direction of apostasy (Acts 20:29, 30; III Jn. 9,10). After the deaths of the apostles, this apostasy moved forward unchecked and with ever-increasing momentum.

This first period of post-apostolic church history was also one of persecution. By the end of the First Century the Roman government had settled on a policy of persecution against Christians. These persecutions would continue intermittently throughout the Second and Third Centuries but would finally be brought to an end by the Edict of Milan which was issued by Emperor Constantine in 313 A.D. Nevertheless, this was also a period of tremendous numerical and geographical growth for the church. This first period of post-apostolic church history, the "Ante-Nicene Age," is so named because it is the period "before" (signified by the word "ante") the Council of Nicea, the first general council of the church, which was convened by Constantine in 325 A.D. at Nicea in Asia Minor.

II. The Rise of the Monarchical Episcopate

The first form which apostasy generally took in the church was in the corruption of its organization. The first step in this organizational corruption, which would evolve over several centuries into the office of a supreme and infallible "pope," was the monarchical episcopate ("monarchical" meaning "one-ruling"' and "episcopate" referring to the "office of a bishop"). Exactly how and when this monarchical episcopate began is not known. Very possibly this development began even in the late apostolic age (Acts 20:29,30; III Jn. 9,10). In any event, it is quite clear that this change in the church's organization became fairly well established in some places during the first quarter of the Second Century. Ignatius, himself the monarchical bishop of Antioch, wrote (110-117) in favorable reference to the monarchical bishops of several churches in cities of Asia Minor. Of course, in the apostolic age, "presbyters" (elders) and "bishops" were terms used interchangeably in reference to the body of men who had the oversight of each church. However, as time went on, one elder began to be exalted above the other elders of a church and the title of "bishop" reserved for him alone. In the early Second Century this practice was not occurring everywhere, and the authority of the monarchical bishop was local, not diocesan (regional), in scope, but by 160 A.D. the monarchical episcopate was well-nigh universal. Eventually, the concept of ''apostolic succession," that bishops were to carry on with the role, authority and responsibilities of the apostles, would be combined with this concept of the episcopate to give it greater power and dignity.

Some historians believe that the development of a stronger episcopate gave churches a greater sense of institutional unity by virtue of a centralized focus of authority and carried the church successfully through the perilous period of heresies. Below is a chart giving the basic words used in the New Testament in reference to the rulers of a local church:

Scriptures Greek Terms Translations Meanings

Eph. 4:11 poimen pastor shepherd

Acts 11:30; presbuteros presbyter, elder an older man (of

14:23; 20:17 maturity and

experience)

Phil. 1:1; episkopos bishop overseer; super-

continued
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397573 Oct 20, 2012
Acts 20:28 visor

From the above, and other, Scriptures three conclusions can be drawn which set the office of bishop in stark contrast to that which later developed in the apostate church.(1) Firstly, the three terms, "elder," "bishop," and pastor," are all used interchangeably in reference to the same office (Acts 20:17,28; Tit. 1:5,7; I Pet. 5:1,2; Eph. 4:11).(It should be noted that the word translated "feed" in two of the preceding passages is the Greek word "poimaino," which means "to pastor" or "to shepherd.." Also, in the last passage where the various officers of the church are listed it is difficult to see how elders could have been omitted when teachers and evangelists are mentioned, unless the elders are the pastors.) The only difference they may have is to emphasize a different facet of the same office. However, there is not Scriptural basis for applying one term exclusively to one individual.(2) Secondly, whenever a church of the New Testament is mentioned as having elders, it had exactly that - elders, not "an elder" or "pastor." In other words, the New Testament order is that a local church always has a plurality of elders. This in itself would seem to indicate that the Lord does not desire that one man be exalted as supreme overseer of a local church. And if He did not desire that it be done on even a local level, how could it please Him to be done on a regional or universal level?(3) Thirdly, there is no Scriptural indication that the authority of an elder extended beyond the local church of which he was a member. Elders were to shepherd the flock of God among them (I Pet. 5:1,2)- the one of which the Holy Spirit had made them overseers (Acts 20:28).

Persecution of the Church

By the beginning of the Second Century the church was well-established in the regions of Syria, Macedonia, Greece, Egypt, and Rome, but it was most extensive in Asia Minor. By this time also it had elicited both popular and governmental opposition. Already the church had endured the persecutions of Nero (54-68) and Domitian (81-96). Such persecutions are indicative of the growing prominence of the church in ancient society. The Roman Government vented its wrath upon Christians because of their refusal to recognize and worship the emperor as a god, but popular animosity against Christians was aroused due to accusations of atheism (because they denied the traditional gods), licentiousness (because their worship was often carried on secretly after nightfall), and cannibalism (because of a misunderstanding of the Lord's Supper — an accusation which the Roman Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation would, ironically, give much truth). Christians were also hated for their exclusiveness and the idea that they alone had the truth. Thus began a cycle of persecutions and respites which continued for two centuries until a final edict granting religious liberty was issued by Constantine in 313 A.D. Because of these accusations and persecutions men known as "Apologists" (from the Greek word apologia, meaning a "defense") arose and tried to give a philosophical defense to the gospel and church before the Roman rulers.

http://www.bible.ca/history/eubanks/history-e...
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397574 Oct 20, 2012
Part II - The Ante-Nicene Age: Lesson No. 8 - The "Catholic" Church

Diminution of Eastern churches. Churches in the East, such as Ephesus, Antioch, and Jerusalem, were hurt by the Jewish-Roman war (135) and the Montanist struggle in Asia Minor. The decline of these churches left a vacuum which Rome began to fill. By 200 Rome was the most imminent and influential church. Rome's growing power is illustrated in the Easter controversy. In the West Easter was always celebrated on Sunday, while in Asia Minor it was celebrated on the fourteenth of Nisan, regardless of the day it was. The controversy became so acute that synods were held in Rome and Palestine on the matter. These synods decided in favor of the Roman practice, and when the churches of Asia Minor refused to conform, Victor, bishop of Rome (189-198), excommunicated them.

http://www.bible.ca/history/eubanks/history-e...

Can already see Satan at work through the RCC.
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397575 Oct 20, 2012
Introduction
Though the emphasis in recent lessons has been upon the departures of the post-apostolic church from New Testament teachings concerning the organization for the church, it should not be forgotten that other changes in doctrine and practice, though perhaps more subtly and slowly, were also being made. This could only be expected. When men refuse to acknowledge, and adhere to, the authoritative pattern of the New Testament in one particular there is no reason for them to do so in other matters. Apostasy cannot long be confined to one aspect of the church. It may be that changes in the organizational structure of the church had to occur first in order to provide an avenue for further apostasies. This is to say that the basis of authority had to be shifted from the New Testament and the bishops of local churches to sources such as tradition, monarchical bishops, the clergy, and synods, for the New Testament itself contained no justification for the coming apostasies. Thus, the initial organizational changes paved the way for changes in doctrine, worship, and other practices. In confirmation of this it may be observed that those sects which are most foreign to the New Testament in their practices have sources of authority and organizations just as foreign to the New Testament.

Changes in Worship
A. Days of worship.The day of the week on which saints gathered for worship in the apostolic age was the first day of the week, or Sunday (Acts 20:7; I Cor. 16:1,2; Rev. 1:10). This continued to be the case after the deaths of the apostles. Eventually, Wednesday and Friday were set aside as days of fasting. Easter season became the greatest event of the year, and was considered an especially appropriate time for baptisms.

B. Lord's Supper. The Lord's Supper (which became known as the Eucharist, from the Greek verb, "eucharisteo," meaning "to give thanks") was the main focal point of the service in the post-apostolic church. Probably due to the strong influence of heathen and Jewish practices, as well as those of the mystery religions, slow but fundamental changes began to occur in Christians' minds toward the Lord's Supper .(1) Real presence of Christ., Christians began to take more and more literally Christ's words with respect to the bread and wine, "This is My body," and "This is My blood" (Matt. 26:26-29). It gave dramatic meaning to the Lord's Supper to believe that Christ was really present in the elements, though it would be many years later before this idea would reach full bloom and it be concluded how He was present.(2) Sacrament. This is defined by a Catholic source as "a sacred sign instituted by Christ to give grace" (Life in Christ, p.161). Thus, the idea began to arise that partaking of the Lord's Supper, per se, could confer special benefits, such as forgiveness of sins, upon the partakers. Consequently, the threat of exclusion from the Lord's Supper became a powerful weapon of manipulation in the hands of the clergy.(3) Sacrifice. Again, though it took many more years to become fully developed, the idea that the observance of the Lord's Supper was a renewal of the sacrifice of Christ began to gain popularity. This thinking made a great contribution to the prestige and power of the clergy. Something fraught with such awesome importance required the special handling of skilful hands and knowledgeable minds; that is, those of "priests."

C. Veneration of "saints."The term, "saint" means "holy one" one set apart to the service of God. In the New Testament all Christians were regarded as saints (I Cor. 1:2). However, the term eventually came to be used exclusively in reference to a few pious elite who had attained a special degree of holiness by virtue of their works. Early persecutions also produced a number of martyrs. Saints and martyrs at first were honored and commemorated, but they eventually began to be prayed to and venerated. Even their relics were highly prized. This was the roots of saint-worship.
7th Day Catholics Rock

Poplar Bluff, MO

#397576 Oct 21, 2012
continued (note) in the previous post the early Christians met on several days of the week not only the first and no commandment was given to change the Sabbath day rest to the first day.

Baptism and Forgiveness of Sins

A. Baptism. This early became a matter of diverse and heated controversies.

(1) Formula. Whether the names of all of the Trinity were to be pronounced at baptism (Matt. 28:19), or only that of Christ (Acts 2:38), was a matter of concern. Supposedly, it was the practice of the early post-apostolic churches to immerse the candidate once for each of the three members of the Trinity.

(2) Catechumens. This was one who was receiving instruction in the faith preparatory to his baptism. This practice of deferring baptism until the candidate was properly taught was thought to protect the church from unworthy members. The period of instruction might last two or three years.

(3) Subjects. There are no references to infant baptism until an obscure one by Ireneus about 185. However, infant baptism began to be increasingly popular because infants, as much as adults, were thought to be in need of the benefits conferred through baptism.

(4) Administrants. The mid-Third Century witnessed a heated controversy over validity of heretical baptism. Out of this controversy grew additional emphasis upon the qualifications of the ones administering baptism. Hence, it became a rite to be performed by the clergy with appropriate ritualism attending it. Nonmembers were excluded from baptisms.

(5) Method. Though immersion has always prevailed in the East, it began to give way to pouring (affusion) water over the head in the West. At first it was done only in those cases which supposedly necessitated it.

B. Forgiveness of sins.(1) Unforgivable sins. This was also a matter of long and general discussion. The number and kind of unforgivable sins kept fluctuating, but renunciation of faith was perhaps the most persistent one.

(2) Absolution. Persecutions produced many disavowals of faith which, in turn, raised the question of forgiveness for those who desired restoration. Though practices differed, the right to pronounce penance (involving "making amends") and absolution (forgiveness) was ultimately granted to the clergy - another step which vastly increased their power.

http://www.bible.ca/history/eubanks/history-e...
Pad

Fishers, IN

#397577 Oct 21, 2012
ReginaM wrote:
<quoted text>
Father, I don't know if you meant this for Hermie or not, but I spoke to Sera and she wanted me to ask you to say Mass for him and keep him in your prayers daily. He's still in ICU but is stable right now. He has a team of doctors there who are working to get to the bottom of the situation. His priest visited but he couldn't receive communion as he couldn't take anything by mouth, however he did annoint him.
Sera also asked that everyone of sincere heart please pray for him.
I didn't know this,so thank you for sharing,as we all can read this.Herme is a great fellow,his posts are always respectful and with much gratitude. I will remember him also with you all in prayer.He loves the Lord and that is very obvious.Hope his wife Serphima will be given the strength to deal with the whole matter,also his sons and daughters.

God richly bless Herme and help him to recover quickly.He has so much to do yet,and his family needs him now in their lives more than ever. He has so much love for you Lord and his family,and all those he has come in contact with throughout his life.May your love now give him peace as he physically goes through this trial.He needs the Peace that passes all understanding.In Christ's Holy Name we pray,AMEN!
Pad

Fishers, IN

#397578 Oct 21, 2012
Robert F wrote:
<quoted text>
good friend
We are at an impasse on our belief systems....I definitely do respect a person who does not take their eyes off of God....
So lets turn to our relationship to Mary....
John 19:26,27
"When Jesus therefore saw his mother, and the disciple standing by, whom he loved, he saith unto his mother, Woman, behold thy son!
Then saith he to the disciple, Behold thy mother! And from that hour that disciple took her unto his own home."
If we love Jesus, as this disciple did, can we accept what he did to fulfill scripture as Jesus in his last words?
To put it another way, if we do accept her, as our own mother into our home, then the new question comes about: If Mary is good enough for God to bear and raise a son named Jesus, then is she good enough to be a mother to me as she did her Son?
I understand what you are saying here,however as preston said it is a matter of Jewish culture that Jesus hands over the care of His mother to whmomever He chooses,and JOHN the beloved even more so than the brothers and sisters of Jesus was chosen to care for Mary.

We see culture here,but of course one can pray and ask the Lord to make that situation real to them through the Holy Spirit, in htat one can love Mary as a MOTHER who cared much for her own,especially Jesus the Incarnate Son of God our Father.Mary is honored and spoken of by all believers today,whether with reverence,adoration and godly respect.To really argue that Mary deserves anything or not from God is what we are doing basically here at times.

I find it unsettling when any believer continues to try to limit Mary to practically just a bystander,many prots have done that and still do.We know that she is very much part of the Savior's life,her suffering at the cross cannot be dissected by human opinion,as the LORD knows truly what she endured as she watched her Son suffer and die on that cruel Cross.

But I find it equally disconcerting when people pray before images of Mary which are false impressions of h e r,and also give so much to the veneration of her in this world,to the point of worship,and including the Holy Spirit as her Spouse.We are not to worship any human being as the heathen do.We are not to mimic the ancient worship and veneration of Isis and other depictions of the Queen of heaven in ancient mythology.The Jews abhored such things and we believers in Christ should do the same,not encourage it.

God will exalt us all in due time,to give Mary such divine like titles and build so many edifices in her name and honor,and to constantly implore believers to venerate images of her,and call her the spouse of God the Holy Spirit is exalting her. It shakes the foundation of the Judeo-Christian theology that comes out of the Holy Scriptures.

Since: Nov 08

usa

#397579 Oct 21, 2012
River Tam wrote:
b-b-q'd? jethro? Are you dying? I'm going to die. It's what happens. He not busy being born is busy dying.~ Bob Dylan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =pQ5XtabITh8XX
not going to die in near future but,i live day to day with the fact that my next trip to the doctors could be my last. i have been fighting color/rectal cancer for 7 years now,and i'm a lucky guy,i'm still here most people survive 5 yrs.i still work full time,do what my doctors tell me and that is why i'm still here,i don't sit around waiting for death to come,i go out and live my life like there is nothing wrong,i WILL NOT die from this I refuse too.

Since: Nov 08

usa

#397580 Oct 21, 2012
River Tam wrote:
<quoted text>
Wow, that's like a wall of words.
Cool.
if that pic is you,you are a very pretty young girl.get off of here and get out and live life before you get old like me and you miss it.

Since: Nov 08

usa

#397581 Oct 21, 2012
Free Mind wrote:
Interesting story. On the other hand, you saw something that, during their decades-long, worldwide cover-up, the supposed "one true church" never did -- report an allegation to authorities. In one case at least, the BSA acted in a more moral fashion than a church supposedly led by God.
what helped i believe was the fact that the leader of the bsa here,had two young boys of his own,and that set him off,and everything was handled in a blink of an eye,just wish i could of gotten a hold of him.

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