Leslie Van Houten's parole hearing Au...
stevlin

AOL

#22 Aug 5, 2009
This killing pig should never leave prison walls. She took a life so her life should have been taken. Let her rot away. Why did the prison give her college education? A waste of time and money on that evil pig. When they go to prison for life, that's what it should be and no parole. She doesn't deserve it. Prison life should be horrible, bread and water. No medical, no movies, tv, or any entertainment. She killed and only deserves dark days ahead. If prison life could be made dark, dank and totally miserable, perhaps folks would think first before they do the crime.
diego

Panama

#23 Aug 5, 2009
her sentence is life *with* possibility of parole.
she meets all of the standards for parole, so there is only one choice:
let her out. if the sentence had been otherwise, so be it.
our system has to be stronger than sentiments of the times--who are we now to change how she was sentenced in 1977? it's done. carry it out.
Joe Wheels

Bronx, NY

#24 Aug 5, 2009
diego wrote:
her sentence is life *with* possibility of parole.
she meets all of the standards for parole, so there is only one choice:
let her out. if the sentence had been otherwise, so be it.
our system has to be stronger than sentiments of the times--who are we now to change how she was sentenced in 1977? it's done. carry it out.
Diego! Your insights into the laws as written and understood is quite meaningful! It seems you have followed Leslie's case closely like I have. In my mind it's not clear who murdered Rose Mary La Bianca. After years of discovering evidence I think Leslie may have stabbed q corpse! Charles 'Tex' Watson is the perpetrator of the La Bianca slayings. Leslie, then age 19, inflicted additional damage after the fact! While Watson was on his rage, he handed the knife to Leslie and said:"Do something!" Fearing that Watson might turn on her and stab her when she didn't act, Van Houten stabbed Rose Mary an additional 16 times. Is one guilty of murder by stabbing a person who has already died? Leslie has overpaid her dues! It's time for a parole date!
T Pup

United States

#25 Aug 6, 2009
Joe Wheels wrote:
<quoted text>Diego! Your insights into the laws as written and understood is quite meaningful! It seems you have followed Leslie's case closely like I have. In my mind it's not clear who murdered Rose Mary La Bianca. After years of discovering evidence I think Leslie may have stabbed q corpse! Charles 'Tex' Watson is the perpetrator of the La Bianca slayings. Leslie, then age 19, inflicted additional damage after the fact! While Watson was on his rage, he handed the knife to Leslie and said:"Do something!" Fearing that Watson might turn on her and stab her when she didn't act, Van Houten stabbed Rose Mary an additional 16 times. Is one guilty of murder by stabbing a person who has already died? Leslie has overpaid her dues! It's time for a parole date!
One is guilty just by being there. One is guilty by withholding evidence. One is guilty by conspiring with others to have your lawyer killed. More power to her if she's changed her life, the fact remains she was involved in a horrific murder, the lives of the victims were taken not to menton a piece of there families lives. She should sacrifice hers to the end, without complaint. The fact that she even entertains the idea of parole shows she doesn't yet know the impact her crimes have caused on others.
diego

Panama

#26 Aug 6, 2009
it frustrates me to no end reading these posts. parole boards do not have the right to re-sentence anyone. they simply should consider the evaluations given to them, and the prisoner's likelihood of future violence. leslie van houten has nothing but shinning evaluations, and no expert that i know of considers her a risk. there is only one conclusion that can be made: let her out. but since it was a high profile case, the parole board continues to stretch the law by re-sentencing her to life in light of very favorable evaluations. it's the integrity of the system folks, not simply what feels right and vindictive towards one person.
T Pup

United States

#27 Aug 6, 2009
I would venture a guess that any murderer who was freed by a parole board, the board was 100% certain the individual was rehabilitated. Yet history tells us many of those freed go out and commit violent crimes again. Lelie Van Houten was sentenced to death. Had CA. not revoked the death penalty we wouldn't be having this discussion. She needs to die in jail.
Joe Wheels

Bronx, NY

#28 Aug 6, 2009
All of the opinions expressed on this post are respected and valued. LA County Deputy District Attorney Patrick Sequeria and the California Parole Board are holding all of Leslie's cards. By month's end we are going to have a better understanding of how the Parole Board feels about Leslie's accomplishments and the politics of paroling her. Of all the murderers involved in the mayhem of August 9+10 1969 Leslie Van Houten is least culpable. It's a very gray area when considering Leslie's direct involvement in Rose Mary La Bianca's death. Charles 'Tex' Watson had stabbed Rose Mary an unimaginable amount before handing the knife to Leslie and saying:"Do something!" It is quite possible Leslie Van Houten stabbed a corpse. Leslie is complicit in Rose Mary and Leno La Bianca's murders yet the gray area surrounding Rose Mary's death leaves Leslie least responsible for the horrific outcomes!
SAM

Derwood, MD

#29 Aug 6, 2009
Joe Wheels wrote:
Young and vulnerable during the August 1969 Manson slayings, Leslie Van Houten has been incarcerated for 38 years in California. Now a responsible, mature, educated adult Ms. Van Houten is worthy of being paroled and giving back to society. Endless incarcerations, except for the truly violent and dangerous members of prisons, is at tax-payers expenses. Leslie Van Houten is a model example of the effectiveness of the California detention system. Having Van Houten contribute to society only strengthens the aforementioned claim!
The $$ does not mitigate in any way the chance
taking at letting this carnivore out after an impressivley unrealistic enviornment for all those years.

I would not have ever been capable of doing what she did-and I went through some of those hazy days in the USA,-then 38 mor in prison?

And you want her out?

How about the wellbeing of the rest of society?
We have already made that monetary investment to keep murderers out and our families and neighbors -the innocent safe!
Talk is cheap.
I do not have it in me to do what she did.
You have no way of knowing for certain who she really is.
That is the deal breaker.
SAM

Derwood, MD

#30 Aug 6, 2009
Joe Wheels wrote:
Considering the imminent parole hearing for Leslie Van Houten I believe an objective assessment of what Ms. van Houten has accomplished while being housed at the California Institute for Women is warranted. Leslie Van Houten has educated herself and now has two college degrees, including a Master's Degree in Education. Coupling these achievements with her Teaching Certificate she is a viable candidate to teach at a California junior college. Her personal experiences are also very valuable in the classroom as she can easily sense when a younger person might be falling by the wayside and she may intervene accordingly. People change and situations change. Leslie Van Houten is more valuable in our society than having her incarcerated for another five years. She regrets her associations with the Manson Family and has changed her life to prove she is capable of contributing to society.
What else did she have to do?
Sons of man

Derwood, MD

#31 Aug 6, 2009
ajax wrote:
<quoted text>The famlies should let go and move on, life is to short let her be judged by a higher power. One of the LaBiancas daughter has asked for Tex Watson to be released. I don't know how I would feel if this happened to my family.
Who had short lives??

And because of whom????!!

Wo is your highher power-
Dora the Explora?
chillhouse

Council Bluffs, IA

#32 Aug 6, 2009
Outraged wrote:
F her!!! Look up the crime scene photos. Look at what they did to 8 1/2 month pregnant Sharon Tate. Look at what they did to the other victims. Let that bitch Van Houten rot until she dies.
uh, van houten did not participate in the Tate murders ....!
Steve

West Hollywood, CA

#33 Aug 6, 2009
Some people need to open their eyes. They really do. These old (and now stale) arguments of "what about Sharon Tate's rights" or "how would you feel if..." After 40 years, 3 words come to mind... Blah. Blah. Blah.

Back in 1992, I had a good friend get killed by a drunk driver. I wanted the book thrown at him. He ended up getting 10 years in jail (about 70 years less than we hoped at the time. Needless to say we were disappointed). When those 10 years were up, a bunch of us were sitting around, talking about what we had done in our lives. Yes, we spoke about what our friend couldn't and wouldn't be able to do since he is gone, but we kept coming back to the fact that maybe this drunken driver could help society in the future, and prevents others from going down a similar path.

I'm not downplaying the severity of this. It was a horrendous and evil crime. For all intensive purposes, that night we realized the Boogeyman actually exists. I've heard about it constantly, being that I've grown up here in L.A.

We aren't talking 5 years. Or 10. Or 25. Or even 35. It has now been 40 years, and its time for Leslie to be out in society and attempt to share her tale in hopes of convincing others to not walk down the wrong path. If she dies in prison, then it was punishment for what she did, and the message is "do time for the crime". If she gets out, then she can discuss all that time lost...
simplylorrie

San Diego, CA

#35 Aug 6, 2009
Come on...the prison system is supposed to be about rehabilitation, not strictly punishment. Leslie VH is a classic example of someone TRULY seeing the error in their actions and putting every ounce of their being into redeeming themselves so they can make a positive impact on their world.
There is no way to "pay back a life". Leslie knows what she did was wrong, and she knows she would never have done such a thing in her right mind unaffected by brainwashing and drugs.
I say give her the chance to be a positive force in our world...she CAN do that. Then something good could come of the whole tragic situation, many long years after the fateful night.
THAT is redemption.
simplylorrie

San Diego, CA

#36 Aug 6, 2009
SAM wrote:
<quoted text>
What else did she have to do?
Trust me, there is a LOT she could have done in prison instead of choosing a positive path. The negative path is by far the way of least resistance behind prison walls, yet Leslie consistntly chooses positive routes to positive outcomes.
Prison is no playground, it's not like she has been watching soap operas and eating bon-bons all these years! She has worked just as hard to gain her achevements, education, etc., as anyone else would have to work, in a far less conducive environment to learning and with far less input and assistance available to foster that learning.
And contrary to popular belief, most college programs in state prisons are NOT paid for by taxpayers, but by the inmates themselves or their families on the outside.
Give the woman a chance...she has earned the right to try to live on the outside again and be a prioductive member of society.
T Pup

United States

#37 Aug 7, 2009
simplylorrie wrote:
<quoted text>
Trust me, there is a LOT she could have done in prison instead of choosing a positive path. The negative path is by far the way of least resistance behind prison walls, yet Leslie consistntly chooses positive routes to positive outcomes.
Prison is no playground, it's not like she has been watching soap operas and eating bon-bons all these years! She has worked just as hard to gain her achevements, education, etc., as anyone else would have to work, in a far less conducive environment to learning and with far less input and assistance available to foster that learning.
And contrary to popular belief, most college programs in state prisons are NOT paid for by taxpayers, but by the inmates themselves or their families on the outside.
Give the woman a chance...she has earned the right to try to live on the outside again and be a prioductive member of society.
I would say it would bee much harder to earn a college degree as a free citizen then in jail. Your gaurenteed 3 meals a day, and you have nothing but time to study. She had 40 years to earn those degrees. It would be interesting to know when she aquired them.

I've seen interviews of the manson girls 20 years after. Some of them are still as duped by Charlie as they were 20 years ago. Who's to say she has rehabbed. I say proceed with caution on the side of error. We as a society owe her nothing.
T Pup

United States

#38 Aug 7, 2009
Steve wrote:
Some people need to open their eyes. They really do. These old (and now stale) arguments of "what about Sharon Tate's rights" or "how would you feel if..." After 40 years, 3 words come to mind... Blah. Blah. Blah.
Back in 1992, I had a good friend get killed by a drunk driver. I wanted the book thrown at him. He ended up getting 10 years in jail (about 70 years less than we hoped at the time. Needless to say we were disappointed). When those 10 years were up, a bunch of us were sitting around, talking about what we had done in our lives. Yes, we spoke about what our friend couldn't and wouldn't be able to do since he is gone, but we kept coming back to the fact that maybe this drunken driver could help society in the future, and prevents others from going down a similar path.
I'm not downplaying the severity of this. It was a horrendous and evil crime. For all intensive purposes, that night we realized the Boogeyman actually exists. I've heard about it constantly, being that I've grown up here in L.A.
We aren't talking 5 years. Or 10. Or 25. Or even 35. It has now been 40 years, and its time for Leslie to be out in society and attempt to share her tale in hopes of convincing others to not walk down the wrong path. If she dies in prison, then it was punishment for what she did, and the message is "do time for the crime". If she gets out, then she can discuss all that time lost...
Blah blah blah? You say she may prevent someone from going down the wrong road, well she may hook up with her former family members and take more lives also. There are no gaurentees and I for one am siuck of these fools getting out and wreaking havok on society.

One week ago there was a murder in my town. The guy that did it had a LONG history of violent crimes. They just kept giving him chances. Now he's on the run and there is a 30 y/o young man dead at his hands. Fuck the murderers and criminals and Leslie Van Houten. She's trash and always will be.
the examiner

Montréal, Canada

#39 Aug 7, 2009
T Pup wrote:
<quoted text>
I would say it would bee much harder to earn a college degree as a free citizen then in jail. Your gaurenteed 3 meals a day, and you have nothing but time to study. She had 40 years to earn those degrees. It would be interesting to know when she aquired them.
I've seen interviews of the manson girls 20 years after. Some of them are still as duped by Charlie as they were 20 years ago. Who's to say she has rehabbed. I say proceed with caution on the side of error. We as a society owe her nothing.
I think it s not a matter of how easy or how hard it is to earn a degree in jail but for a woman spending 40 years in jail to earn 2 degrees does mean some thing. It means she is sane and is eager to be free to do something meaningful.

I think they should let her out on parole and see what happens. The woman is almost 60 now and all alone not belonging to a gang of murderers like before in the 70s
top dog

Dixon, MO

#40 Aug 7, 2009
Joe Wheels wrote:
<quoted text>Diego! Your insights into the laws as written and understood is quite meaningful! It seems you have followed Leslie's case closely like I have. In my mind it's not clear who murdered Rose Mary La Bianca. After years of discovering evidence I think Leslie may have stabbed q corpse! Charles 'Tex' Watson is the perpetrator of the La Bianca slayings. Leslie, then age 19, inflicted additional damage after the fact! While Watson was on his rage, he handed the knife to Leslie and said:"Do something!" Fearing that Watson might turn on her and stab her when she didn't act, Van Houten stabbed Rose Mary an additional 16 times. Is one guilty of murder by stabbing a person who has already died? Leslie has overpaid her dues! It's time for a parole date!
NO WAY should she be free. What about the familes
who was left to grive for there lost love ones. They will never be freed. If she is freed i hope its not one of your loved ones she gets next. how sad it will be if shes let out. Lets pray she stays where shes at. "Behind Bars for EVER.
top dog

Dixon, MO

#41 Aug 7, 2009
simplylorrie wrote:
Come on...the prison system is supposed to be about rehabilitation, not strictly punishment. Leslie VH is a classic example of someone TRULY seeing the error in their actions and putting every ounce of their being into redeeming themselves so they can make a positive impact on their world.
There is no way to "pay back a life". Leslie knows what she did was wrong, and she knows she would never have done such a thing in her right mind unaffected by brainwashing and drugs.
I say give her the chance to be a positive force in our world...she CAN do that. Then something good could come of the whole tragic situation, many long years after the fateful night.
THAT is redemption.
You"ve got to be kidding. What the heck is going on? Let her out to get back to the manson family to start killing AGAIN? Hope she moves to your town. And not mine.Why are you defending her? because it wasnt your family she killed? Carefull,
T Pup

United States

#42 Aug 7, 2009
the examiner wrote:
<quoted text>
I think it s not a matter of how easy or how hard it is to earn a degree in jail but for a woman spending 40 years in jail to earn 2 degrees does mean some thing. It means she is sane and is eager to be free to do something meaningful..
I agree with the difficulty matter but was trying to dispute a point to a previouposter. And your point is taken on the issue of LVH earning the two degrees. But lets face it. I wonder if we were talking about a black man in her situation if we would be having this discussion at all. Its once again a matter of society looking at gender to make a decision. Even if she were a white male we wouldmn't be having this discussion.

Charles Manson wasn't even at the scene yet we would never consider letting him out. Of course he hasn't shown a change in attitude, and thats mostly because he doesn't want out. But even if he had we wouldn't consider letting him out.

There were alot of kids dsoing acid in the 60's they were being influenced by all kinds of things, yet they didn't murder.
the examiner wrote:
<quoted text>I think they should let her out on parole and see what happens. The woman is almost 60 now and all alone not belonging to a gang of murderers like before in the 70s.
This is where we disagree.

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