Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#186921 Dec 3, 2012
IV) This American rock and roll musician was best known as a founding member and the drummer of The Beach Boys. (Personality, please) (04 December, 1944 – 28 December, 1983) was a member of the group from its formation until his death in 1983. He was the middle brother of fellow Beach Boys members Brian Wilson and Carl Wilson, and cousin of Mike Love.

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#186922 Dec 3, 2012
V) An American actor, musician, producer, photographer, cartoonist, storyteller, and occasional vintner, (Personality, please) (04 December, 1949) comes from a well-known acting family and began his first televised acting in 1958 as child with his father, Lloyd, and brother Beau on television's “Sea Hunt”. Among his best-known major motion films are: “Tron” (1982) (and its sequel: 2010), “Fearless” (1993), “Iron Man” (2008), “The Last American Hero” (1973), “Starman” (1984), “The Fabulous Baker Boys” (1981), “Jagged Edge” (1985), “Against All Odds” (1984), “The Fisher King” (1991), “Thunderbolt and Lightfoot” (1974), “Seabiscuit” (2003), “Arlington Road” (1999), and “The Big Lebowski” (1998). He won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his role as Otis ‘Bad’ Blake in the 2009 film “Crazy Heart” and earned his sixth Academy Award nomination for his portrayal of Rooster Cogburn in 2010's “True Grit”.

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#186923 Dec 3, 2012
VI) A founding member of Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd, (Personality, please) (04 December 4, 1951) plays lead and rhythm guitar.

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#186924 Dec 3, 2012
VII) Following her work on “As The World Turns”, (Personality, please) (04 December, 1964) came to prominence as a supporting cast member on “The Cosby Show” spinoff “A Different World”, in 1987. After appearing in a few films, her breakthrough came in 1992 with the comedy “My Cousin Vinny”, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Appearing in many films over the past fifteen years, her most commercially successful films to date are “What Women Want” (2000), “Anger Management” (2003), and “Wild Hogs” (2007).

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

#186925 Dec 3, 2012
VIII) This American actress is best known for her role as Kate MacDonald on the American television sitcom “Growing Pains”. (Personality, please) (04 December, 1964) is the wife of actor and Christian evangelist Kirk Cameron.

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#186926 Dec 3, 2012
Fifth Generation wrote:
<quoted text>I take it you mean other than spelling.
Yes, there is a difference.
I can be ‘finished’ with a project without having actually ‘completed’ it ... due to time or materials constraints, or, whatever.
But, you didn't finish it ! Lol ( or complete it )
Circles reign ! Lol

“The holy experience”

Since: Mar 12

Mumbai, India

#186927 Dec 3, 2012
Fifth Generation wrote:
VI) A founding member of Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd,(Personality, please)(04 December 4, 1951) plays lead and rhythm guitar.
who is Gary rossington?

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#186928 Dec 3, 2012
Don't know if these are 100% true but they're entertaining.

Did you know the saying "God willing and the Creek don't rise" was in reference to the Creek Indians and not a body of water? It was written by Benjamin Hawkins in the late 18th century. He was a politician and Indian diplomat. While in the south, Hawkins was requested by the President of the U.S. to return to Washington . In his response, he was said to write, "God willing and the Creek don't rise." Because he capitalized the word "Creek" it is deduced that he was referring to the Creek Indian tribe and not a body of water.
**********
In George Washington's days, there were no cameras. One's image was either sculpted or painted. Some paintings of George Washington showed him standing behind a desk with one arm behind his back while others showed both legs and both arms. Prices charged by painters were not based on how many people were to be painted, but by how many limbs were to be painted. Arms and legs are 'limbs,' therefore painting them would cost the buyer more. Hence the expression,'Okay, but it'll cost you an arm and a leg.'(Artists know hands and arms are more difficult to paint)
**********
As incredible as it sounds, men and women took baths only twice a year (May and October) Women kept their hair covered, while men shaved their heads (because of lice and bugs) and wore wigs. Wealthy men could afford good wigs made from wool. They couldn't wash the wigs, so to clean them they would carve out a loaf of bread, put the wig in the shell, and bake it for 30 minutes. The heat would make the wig big and fluffy, hence the term 'big wig...' Today we often use the term 'here comes the Big Wig' because someone appears to be or is powerful and wealthy.
**********
In the late 1700's, many houses consisted of a large room with only one chair. Commonly, a long wide board folded down from the wall, and was used for dining. The 'head of the household' always sat in the chair while everyone else ate sitting on the floor. Occasionally a guest, who was usually a man, would be invited to sit in this chair during a meal.. To sit in the chair meant you were important and in charge. They called the one sitting in the chair the 'chair man.' Today in business, we use the expression or title 'Chairman' or 'Chairman of the Board.'
**********
Personal hygiene left much room for improvement.. As a result, many women and men had developed acne scars by adulthood. The women would spread bee's wax over their facial skin to smooth out their complexions. When they were speaking to each other, if a woman began to stare at another woman's face she was told,'mind your own bee's wax.' Should the woman smile, the wax would crack, hence the term 'crack a smile'. In addition, when they sat too close to the fire, the wax would melt .... Therefore, the expression 'losing face.'
**********
Ladies wore corsets, which would lace up in the front. A proper and dignified woman, as in 'straight laced' wore a tightly tied lace..
**********

Early politicians required feedback from the public to determine what the people considered important. Since there were no telephones, TV's or radios, the politicians sent their assistants to local taverns, pubs, and bars. They were told to 'go sip some Ale and listen to people's conversations and political concerns. Many assistants were dispatched at different times.'You go sip here' and 'You go sip there.' The two words 'go sip' were eventually combined when referring to the local opinion and, thus we have the term 'gossip.'
**********

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#186929 Dec 3, 2012
Don't know if these are 100% true but they're entertaining.
Did you know the saying "God willing and the Creek don't rise" was in reference to the Creek Indians and not a body of water? It was written by Benjamin Hawkins in the late 18th century. He was a politician and Indian diplomat. While in the south, Hawkins was requested by the President of the U.S. to return to Washington . In his response, he was said to write, "God willing and the Creek don't rise." Because he capitalized the word "Creek" it is deduced that he was referring to the Creek Indian tribe and not a body of water.
**********
In George Washington's days, there were no cameras. One's image was either sculpted or painted. Some paintings of George Washington showed him standing behind a desk with one arm behind his back while others showed both legs and both arms. Prices charged by painters were not based on how many people were to be painted, but by how many limbs were to be painted. Arms and legs are 'limbs,' therefore painting them would cost the buyer more. Hence the expression,'Okay, but it'll cost you an arm and a leg.'(Artists know hands and arms are more difficult to paint)
**********
As incredible as it sounds, men and women took baths only twice a year (May and October) Women kept their hair covered, while men shaved their heads (because of lice and bugs) and wore wigs. Wealthy men could afford good wigs made from wool. They couldn't wash the wigs, so to clean them they would carve out a loaf of bread, put the wig in the shell, and bake it for 30 minutes. The heat would make the wig big and fluffy, hence the term 'big wig...' Today we often use the term 'here comes the Big Wig' because someone appears to be or is powerful and wealthy.
**********
In the late 1700's, many houses consisted of a large room with only one chair. Commonly, a long wide board folded down from the wall, and was used for dining. The 'head of the household' always sat in the chair while everyone else ate sitting on the floor. Occasionally a guest, who was usually a man, would be invited to sit in this chair during a meal.. To sit in the chair meant you were important and in charge. They called the one sitting in the chair the 'chair man.' Today in business, we use the expression or title 'Chairman' or 'Chairman of the Board.'
**********

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#186930 Dec 3, 2012
2nd part

Sorry for the double post.

Common entertainment included playing cards. However, there was a tax levied when purchasing playing cards but only applicable to the 'Ace of Spades...' To avoid paying the tax, people would purchase 51 cards instead. Yet, since most games require 52 cards, these people were thought to be stupid or dumb because they weren't 'playing with a full deck..'
**********
At local taverns, pubs, and bars, people drank from pint and quart-sized containers. A bar maid's job was to keep an eye on the customers and keep the drinks coming. She had to pay close attention and remember who was drinking in 'pints' and who was drinking in 'quarts,' hence the phrase 'minding your 'P's and Q's'.
**********
One more: bet you didn't know this!
In the heyday of sailing ships, all war ships and many freighters carried iron cannons. Those cannons fired round iron cannon balls. It was necessary to keep a good supply near the cannon. However, how to prevent them from rolling about the deck? The best storage method devised was a square-based pyramid with one ball on top, resting on four resting on nine, which rested on sixteen. Thus, a supply of 30 cannon balls could be stacked in a small area right next to the cannon. There was only one problem....how to prevent the bottom layer from sliding or rolling from under the others. The solution was a metal plate called a 'Monkey' with 16 round indentations. However, if this plate were made of iron, the iron balls would quickly rust to it. The solution to the rusting problem was to make 'Brass Monkeys.' Few landlubbers realize that brass contracts much more and much faster than iron when chilled.. Consequently, when the temperature dropped too far, the brass indentations would shrink so much that the iron cannonballs would come right off the monkey; Thus, it was quite literally,'Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey.'(All this time, you thought that was an improper expression, didn't you.)
BLong

United States

#186931 Dec 4, 2012
Alex Trebek wrote:
__________ AUTHORS & THEIR WORKS __________
The Dictionary of American Literary Characters lists "Great White Shark" from this 1974 Peter Benchley book
What is 'Jaws'?
BLong

United States

#186932 Dec 4, 2012
Alex Trebek wrote:
`
Nordhoff & Hall's 1934 "Men Against the Sea", the story of Bligh & his men in an open boat, was a sequel to this
What is 'Mutiny on the Bounty'?
BLong

United States

#186933 Dec 4, 2012
Alex Trebek wrote:
`
Budd Schulberg based the alcoholic central character of "The Disenchanted" on this "Gatsby" author
Who was F. Scott Fitzgerald?
BLong

United States

#186934 Dec 4, 2012
Alex Trebek wrote:
`
This character from an 1865 work could vanish at will, with its grin the last part to disappear
What is the Cheshire Cat?
BLong

United States

#186935 Dec 4, 2012
Alex Trebek wrote:
`
Comedy writer Al Franken called his 1996 bestseller this man "Is a Big Fat Idiot"
Who is Rush Limbaugh?
BLong

United States

#186936 Dec 4, 2012
Alex Trebek wrote:
__________ SPORTS __________
This school's Cornhuskers won the 1995 college football title by overwhelming Florida in the Fiesta Bowl
What is the University of Nebraska?
BLong

United States

#186937 Dec 4, 2012
Alex Trebek wrote:
`
In 1980 the NHL's Atlanta Flames moved to this Canadian city
What is Calgary?
BLong

United States

#186938 Dec 4, 2012
Alex Trebek wrote:
`
Technically, this NFL team is located in Orchard Park, New York
What is the New York Giants?
BLong

United States

#186939 Dec 4, 2012
Alex Trebek wrote:
`
At the 1912 Olympics, King Gustav V of Sweden called him "The Greatest Athlete in the World"
Who was Jim Thorpe?
BLong

United States

#186940 Dec 4, 2012
Alex Trebek wrote:
`
As a rookie in 1975, this Chicago Bear led the league in kickoff returns; he went on to a "sweet" career as a running back
Who was Walter Payton?

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Top Stories Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
This ~ or ~ That? (game) (Dec '12) 16 min andet1987 1,837
Poll If you're Christain what kind are you? (Oct '07) 17 min par five 4,082
Prove there's a god. (Mar '08) 40 min Phantom2010 837,024
Which is the Oldest Indian Language? Sanskrit V... (Jul '08) 42 min The swamiji 7,155
Tamil vs Kannada. Which one is the oldest langu... (Oct '12) 46 min The swamiji 1,427
Bush is a hero (Sep '07) 55 min lightbeamrider 176,756
News Roman Catholic church only true church, says Va... (Jul '07) 1 hr Tony17 589,351
Poll Was 9/11 a conspiracy?? (Oct '07) 1 hr Porkpie Hat 271,262
More from around the web