Bush is a hero

“The future begins”

Since: Jul 07

every moment

#161009 Apr 6, 2013
lisw wrote:
<quoted text>I'm not sure what you mean by the problems that are left. If problems do remain, if African Americans do not the only thing I can see is that the ones that don't make it have been institutionalized in a way. I don't know exactly how to explain what I'm trying to say. Blackheart is right, blacks were almost exclusively the inhabitants of the projects, but it's not because the blacks wanted that, it's because the government wanted that. Once in that situation, the schools are not good, why would they be if there is little financial support with property taxes. Busing became too difficult, and it's like dominoes, one bad thing creates another, and it's hard to get out. Quite frankly I think the projects were basically meant to be much like the reservations. The promise was something of their own and it never was their own. To me it is miraculous how many african americans have managed to overcome the odds. It speaks well for their determination.
This sounds like what you might call a "drive-by assessment" of public housing. For those of us who actually lived there, the reality paints a different picture.

As a newly divorced mother of two, my mother too advantage of public housing in about 64-66. While waiting for a slot, we lived in relative's houses, and even a garage for a time. In my memory, it it was a representative demographic mix of low-income people - single mothers, elderly, blacks, whites, the gamut. Two of my great-grandmothers also lived in the "projects". I don't know about you, but we were thankful that society, thru gov't, provided a means we could get out of living in a garage.

As for getting out, it comes down to opportunity and desire. For single women at the time, much as was for minorities, in spite of how much desire there was, there just weren't many family-wage jobs for high-school educated women in the 60's (much less today). A woman's best chances at the time were to find a man to marry, and such was the case here - we didn't get out until Mom married a man with a decent job. As hard as it was for a woman, I can only imagine the obstacles for a socially-marginalized minority.

You say it's the gov't who "wants" to keep them there. I say it's a lack of desire on the part of a few, but a lack of opportunity to escape for the overwhelming majority.
indy

Jacksonville, FL

#161010 Apr 6, 2013
antonyto wrote:
Its nice to see you've overlooked that he lied every step of the way. If he had any truth for the invasion of Iraq don't you think he would have gotten more support from around the world?
wether he was right or wrong he did it illegaly. Or does that matter?
...acc to oblamer, the prez has no power, its all congress.... i was quite surprized to hear o exonerate bush without knowing it..... so i wonder, since the prez has no power, and its just congress, how could it have been bush who left him a mess?..he should state congress left him a mess..... and why vote for a demprez? he has no power right?... but he sure seems like he has alot of power, just a chronic liar ....... oblamer lied, people died ....

“Custer @ LBH - Ooops”

Since: Nov 07

Bakersfield, CA

#161011 Apr 6, 2013
Sister Kathryn Lust wrote:
<quoted text>I mostly like you, you know.
And I know you couldn't possibly care less.
That's life.
Wrong. But that only indicates you have a VERY low threshold.
Suggest you quickly re-evaluate.

Since: Jun 08

Location hidden

#161012 Apr 6, 2013
Rudyard Kiplingesque wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, I think that when the housing opened, backs were redominantly qualified, socially and economically, and filed up immediate housing, and it just kinda' stayed that way. Not every government housing roject went that way. Yesler Terrace, in Seattle has a fine mix of eople, whites, blacks, Native Americans, and Chinese al living together in a six block area.
Ceder Park, and Geneva Woods, in Juneau Alaska are good examples of housing Not gone to seed. Ceder Park opeed in the late sixties, all wood structures, but well kept, and Geneva Woods, which opened in 1975, was the absolute Best housing project I've ever seen. Beautiful apartments, with well kept grounds and social orde throughout. No gang fights or drunken brawls. Stayed there with my girlfriend for a few weeks before I shipped off to college. There's a decent complex here in redding, but the waiting list is two years long. My daughter is trying to get i there. She's twenty right now, and might end up moving to Oklahoma before anything opens up there.
I'm glad your back, BH.
It makes sense what you're saying, but I can't help but notice that many immigrants came, were hated, lived poor and by the next generation broke out and went elsewhere, whereas many african americans remain in a viscious cycle generation after generation. I can't help but feel if the projects had not occurred, that if the great society had not occurred that full integration would have occurred and we wouldn't be having this discussion. I think with all of the "help" we are giving new immigrants we will see other groups put into that viscious cycle. Obviously it's just a theory, I can't prove it.

“Pillars of Creation....”

Since: Jan 11

Into this world we're thrown

#161013 Apr 6, 2013
lisw wrote:
<quoted text>I'm glad your back, BH.
It makes sense what you're saying, but I can't help but notice that many immigrants came, were hated, lived poor and by the next generation broke out and went elsewhere, whereas many african americans remain in a viscious cycle generation after generation. I can't help but feel if the projects had not occurred, that if the great society had not occurred that full integration would have occurred and we wouldn't be having this discussion. I think with all of the "help" we are giving new immigrants we will see other groups put into that viscious cycle. Obviously it's just a theory, I can't prove it.
They remain in that cycle because of slavery. They were held down and degraded for generation after generation. You'd know better then I, but thats gotta be hard to break out of. i personally see signs of it happening, but I also think there is a long way to go.
JMO..........

“Pillars of Creation....”

Since: Jan 11

Into this world we're thrown

#161014 Apr 6, 2013
Sister Kathryn Lust wrote:
<quoted text>The only real choices we have, are running for office ourselves, or descending upon Congress en masse with picks and staves if that's all we have handy...
JMO
How would we get support? The money is behind the D's and The R's. The committees pick the candidate based on how they will represent the parties interest. If you or i run as a Green party member or an Indy OR Whatever we could barely get off the ground because of financial constraints. We couldnt get nearly the exposure the mainstream politicians could.

Its not gonna be easy. In all honesty anything less then a revolt cant bring change. JMO.

Go ahead and laugh and make fun of me Willie..........

“Help Cecil Help!”

Since: Dec 06

Lafayette IN

#161017 Apr 6, 2013
Rider on the Storm wrote:
<quoted text>
They remain in that cycle because of slavery. They were held down and degraded for generation after generation. You'd know better then I, but thats gotta be hard to break out of. i personally see signs of it happening, but I also think there is a long way to go.
JMO..........
I'm sure you mean slavery + Jim Crow/segregation, but when you just use the term slavery you give a false impression of the timeline by anywhere from seventy to a hundred years (depending on where in the country you're talking about).
TVnews

AOL

#161027 Apr 6, 2013
.

TOP TV PREACHER now vulgar, drinks, wears Catholic Collar --

http://youtu.be/dakrVCtYkXs


.

“Pillars of Creation....”

Since: Jan 11

Into this world we're thrown

#161028 Apr 6, 2013
HipGnosis wrote:
<quoted text>I believe we have an example here of "damned if ya do, damned if ya don't.
If you paid any attention to Ryan's "plan", which was adopted by the Romney campaign, it included cuts to Social Security. Some cynically noted at the time that the cuts didn't affect current recipients, but those in the future, thus avoiding alienating current senior voters by putting the reforms off onto those not yet affected. I may have missed it, but I don't recall anyone "leaning right" being this excited about SS cuts at the time.
Now the President, in an attempt at reaching bipartisan support for a budget plan, has reluctantly ("not ideal", he said) included modest SS reforms in his budget, primarily in the way cost-of-living raises are calculated.
Put simply, the Republican fiscal plan included SS cuts, and this was only noticed by "entitlement liberals". Now the President offers to incorporate some of their ideas, in bipartisan fashion, and he is criticized for it.
This is why I feel it obvious that many critics are more opportunists, than true democratic conservatives.
As my mama used to say, "Can't win for losin'...."
Its because he's using it as a bargaining chip (he's dumb like that). And there are no winners. Seniors lose and taxpayers lose..........

Since: Jun 08

Location hidden

#161029 Apr 6, 2013
Rider on the Storm wrote:
<quoted text>
They remain in that cycle because of slavery. They were held down and degraded for generation after generation. You'd know better then I, but thats gotta be hard to break out of. i personally see signs of it happening, but I also think there is a long way to go.
JMO..........
Thanks for not commenting on my viscious vs vicious.
I know that African americans had alot more to deal with. It's not color it's history, but I do think we did a further disservice by allowing segregation, actually encouraging it. This may sound far fetched but I saw so many older people and disabled people just sort of give up when they were put into special housing units. I think it increases their isolation. I'm sure the thought was they were doing them a favor, keeping them comfortable with their own kind, easier to give services to. But I also wonder how much of it is to get them out of sight, for the comfort of other people.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#161030 Apr 6, 2013
Chris Clearwater wrote:
<quoted text>
Agree. Well time to help my wifes Dad move into a nuring home. Later.
Good Luck

“I'm here with bells on.”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#161031 Apr 6, 2013
Rider on the Storm wrote:
<quoted text>
How would we get support? The money is behind the D's and The R's. The committees pick the candidate based on how they will represent the parties interest. If you or i run as a Green party member or an Indy OR Whatever we could barely get off the ground because of financial constraints. We couldnt get nearly the exposure the mainstream politicians could.
Its not gonna be easy. In all honesty anything less then a revolt cant bring change. JMO.
Go ahead and laugh and make fun of me Willie..........
Those picks and staves are looking better all the time...I say we start with Congress...and move 'up' from there.

But of course, I'm not the Lone Ranger.

“I'm here with bells on.”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#161032 Apr 6, 2013
I'd like to go on record with my opinion that President Obama's remark about our Attorney General being the "...best looking Attorney General ever," was sexist. Who here believes he would have said the same about a male Attorney General?

Even if John Hamm was the Attorney General, I doubt that his looks would be mentioned by the President in a public speech...

Just saying.

“Help Cecil Help!”

Since: Dec 06

Lafayette IN

#161033 Apr 6, 2013
lisw wrote:
<quoted text>Thanks for not commenting on my viscious vs vicious.
I know that African americans had alot more to deal with. It's not color it's history, but I do think we did a further disservice by allowing segregation, actually encouraging it. This may sound far fetched but I saw so many older people and disabled people just sort of give up when they were put into special housing units. I think it increases their isolation. I'm sure the thought was they were doing them a favor, keeping them comfortable with their own kind, easier to give services to. But I also wonder how much of it is to get them out of sight, for the comfort of other people.
But lisw, segregation was a fact before the first public housing areas were built (in the 20s or 30s, I think), both north and south, east and west. Segregation was the rule before the end of the Civil War, and as a whole this country was MORE segregated by 1890-1900 than it had been in 1865.

The facts don't support the idea that public housing was intended to hide anyone, since public housing (especially those projects built in the Great Society era) was built where they were already hidden or restricted/confined to.

At the same time the government was building public housing, the government was also taking steps to ensure that fair housing laws were enforced so that those with the means could move wherever they could afford to go. They were also taking steps to ensure that equal employment laws were enforced so that they had the opportunity to get the means to do that.

The comparison with the elderly and handicapped doesn't work because most of the elderly and handicapped put into a facility had, at one time at least, other options that those in public housing never did.

There are more reasons to criticize or find fault with public housing policy than there ever were individual units available at its height 30 years ago. I'm not defending it in whole or in part, but I think your theory/feeling goes way too far overboard.

“Take It To The Limit”

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#161034 Apr 6, 2013
Sister Kathryn Lust wrote:
I'd like to go on record with my opinion that President Obama's remark about our Attorney General being the "...best looking Attorney General ever," was sexist. Who here believes he would have said the same about a male Attorney General?
Even if John Hamm was the Attorney General, I doubt that his looks would be mentioned by the President in a public speech...
Just saying.
Ya' sure? Have you seen his wife? Her arms are almost as big as mine were when I was healthy. Before he was prez, I bet she used to kick his skinny ass when he got out of line.
The Oscars! Did anyone notice the recycled aluminum dress she had on? Bet it cost sixty-seventy grand. Don't worry, she didn't pay for it. We did. On a lighter note, she did get a return on the dress. She took it down to the can place and got a buck sixty for it.
Even put it back in the budget.(she's no thief.)

“Take It To The Limit”

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#161035 Apr 6, 2013
lisw wrote:
<quoted text>I'm glad your back, BH.
It makes sense what you're saying, but I can't help but notice that many immigrants came, were hated, lived poor and by the next generation broke out and went elsewhere, whereas many african americans remain in a viscious cycle generation after generation. I can't help but feel if the projects had not occurred, that if the great society had not occurred that full integration would have occurred and we wouldn't be having this discussion. I think with all of the "help" we are giving new immigrants we will see other groups put into that viscious cycle. Obviously it's just a theory, I can't prove it.
The 'new' immigrants, starting with the vietnamese 'boat people' were given opportunities that most Americans weren't. They had access to government loans, free money, and affordable housing right from the start. I remember a story in the San Francisco Chronicle. A dozen boat people were arrested in Golden Gate park. Among things in their possession were a number of dead squirrels, foraged plants and roots, and thirteen one hundred dollar bills.
Turned out that they were one family and lived close to the park. Don't remember exactly how long they had been in this country, but it hadn't been too long.
That was in '76 or '77, when $1300. was quite a sum. My rent for a one bedroom apartment was $90.

Since: Jun 08

Location hidden

#161036 Apr 6, 2013
"Gifted Hands" the Ben Carson story is on LMN @ 8:00 P.M. EST, tonight.
UdiotRaceMAKEWOR LDPEACE

United States

#161039 Apr 6, 2013
Rudyard Kiplingesque wrote:
<quoted text>
The 'new' immigrants, starting with the vietnamese 'boat people' were given opportunities that most Americans weren't. They had access to government loans, free money, and affordable housing right from the start. I remember a story in the San Francisco Chronicle. A dozen boat people were arrested in Golden Gate park. Among things in their possession were a number of dead squirrels, foraged plants and roots, and thirteen one hundred dollar bills.
Turned out that they were one family and lived close to the park. Don't remember exactly how long they had been in this country, but it hadn't been too long.
That was in '76 or '77, when $1300. was quite a sum. My rent for a one bedroom apartment was $90.
Hey the ugly US killed many Vietnamese people during the Vietnam war, money as reparation; come on , money can't bring back love ones, as human lives is sacred and can't be paid back with our Dirty bloody American money?
UdiotRaceMAKEWOR LDPEACE

United States

#161040 Apr 6, 2013
lisw wrote:
<quoted text>Thanks for not commenting on my viscious vs vicious.
I know that African americans had alot more to deal with. It's not color it's history, but I do think we did a further disservice by allowing segregation, actually encouraging it. This may sound far fetched but I saw so many older people and disabled people just sort of give up when they were put into special housing units. I think it increases their isolation. I'm sure the thought was they were doing them a favor, keeping them comfortable with their own kind, easier to give services to. But I also wonder how much of it is to get them out of sight, for the comfort of other people.
Public housing is a way of segregating according to race...
UdiotRaceMAKEWOR LDPEACE

United States

#161041 Apr 6, 2013
Roberta G wrote:
<quoted text>
Spot-on, Lyndi.
I first heard of Dr. Carson at least 20 years ago, when I read a Reader's Digest article about him. He seems to be exploding into the national consciousness now, and I can't think of a finer role model for young black men and women to look up to--or ANY American child, for that matter :)
Here you go ignorant...\

Amnesty International for human rights, p3
k"
While successive US governments have used ... international human rights standards as a yardstick by which to judge other countries, they have not consistently applied those same standards at home. In some areas international standards offer greater human rights protection than US domestic law, but the US authorities have refused to recognize the primacy of international law. The USA has been slow to agree to be bound by important international and regional human rights treaties: it is one of only two countries which have failed to ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.(Somalia is other one)

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