OK Health Care Freedom Amendment, Sta...

OK Health Care Freedom Amendment, State Question 756

Created by CitizenTopix on Oct 11, 2010

1,604 votes

Click on an option to vote

Yes

No

Other (explain below)

Donnie

United States

#41151 May 24, 2013
So What wrote:
<quoted text>
For me it is also another example of our money be use to innovate, only to have China steal the technology and take jobs away that was meant to be for us.
That's exactly what happened!
Susan

United States

#41152 May 24, 2013
WMCOL wrote:
<quoted text>
==========
Very beautiful place, love it. You ever see Mark Furhman around there? Wouldn't mind having a little spot in the Mountains like Randy Weaver had before Bush FBI shot his wife in the head and killed her.
What possible purpose do you have to post something like this? Coeur d' Alene is a beautiful place then you post something so very negative and mean. What motivates you?

I thought Weaver's wife and son were killed on Ruby Ridge during Janet Reno's tenure if so then that would be Pres. Bill Clinton.
TAMARA

Edmond, OK

#41153 May 24, 2013
So What wrote:
<quoted text>WE were in a major employment tale spin then, so it is hard to say just how many jobs it effected.
I know it seemed to me that a lot of states were more concerned about politics than putting the money to good use. Take Oklahoma for example, they were against taking the funds to begin with, so when they decided to finally accept the money did they spend it correctly, or did they blow it to prove just how big of a waste it is.
Just so you know; the politically correct term is Hispanic not Mexican. The workers you are referring to are from Central America and South America not just Mexico.
I stand corrected about the name thing.
But I know that many are from Mexico. More so in the states closes to the Mexican broader. In the business that my 2 sons work for and one is head of hiring and one is manager of setting up jobs, has employees that are from Mexico. They are either one that have become citizens with family still in Mexico or is here legally to work. The reason this company does not mind hiring these Hispanics is these people are here to work and show up in good weather and bad. This company puts windows in any place the needs windows and does remodeling. They have more problems with the people that are born here not wanting to show up for work. They think they should get paid but donot see fit to do the work for the pay. We are becoming a country of softies and lazy people.

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#41154 May 24, 2013
TAMARA wrote:
<quoted text>Stupid question here---Is there some kind of insurance carried on Oklahoma schools? If so wouldn't it cover some of the $45 million cost to rebuild these schools?
==========
We all are gonna pay one way or the other

Insurance companies that insure disasters raise rates effecting all of us. If School is self-insured or not, taxpayers will pay with increases in property taxes. For instance Allstate inures in Moore. Allstate rates will go up all over the nation, or insurance company would have a lot of trouble staying in business as a for-profit company. The trick is to keep the insurance companies from gouging but yet allow them reasonable profit.

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#41155 May 24, 2013
Susan wrote:
<quoted text>
What possible purpose do you have to post something like this? Coeur d' Alene is a beautiful place then you post something so very negative and mean. What motivates you?
I thought Weaver's wife and son were killed on Ruby Ridge during Janet Reno's tenure if so then that would be Pres. Bill Clinton.
==========
>>>What possible purpose do you have to post something like this? <<<

Millions of folks still think Ruby Ridge was Clinton and Reno, but it was George H.W. Bush. Shinning that light of truth is "purpose" enough for posting what I did, if it just enlightens one person.
Amanda

United States

#41156 May 24, 2013
Susan wrote:
<quoted text>
What possible purpose do you have to post something like this? Coeur d' Alene is a beautiful place then you post something so very negative and mean. What motivates you?
I thought Weaver's wife and son were killed on Ruby Ridge during Janet Reno's tenure if so then that would be Pres. Bill Clinton.
No I don't think so, Janet Reno worked in the Clinton Administration and she was involved in Waco, Tx. Branch Davidian debacle. So Ruby Ridge was before that. It probably was Bush I administration I remember the FBI and ATF were both faulted and the ROE (rules of engagement)were changed because of what happened on Ruby Ridge. Weaver later sued the federal government and was awarded 4 million dollars...at least that's the way I remember it happening.

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#41157 May 24, 2013
TAMARA wrote:
<quoted text>I stand corrected about the name thing.
But I know that many are from Mexico. More so in the states closes to the Mexican broader. In the business that my 2 sons work for and one is head of hiring and one is manager of setting up jobs, has employees that are from Mexico. They are either one that have become citizens with family still in Mexico or is here legally to work. The reason this company does not mind hiring these Hispanics is these people are here to work and show up in good weather and bad. This company puts windows in any place the needs windows and does remodeling. They have more problems with the people that are born here not wanting to show up for work. They think they should get paid but donot see fit to do the work for the pay. We are becoming a country of softies and lazy people.
==========
More Mexicans than Central and South Americans. When I first moved to California I called Mexicans Hispanics. They resented the name Hispanic and told me they are Mexican not Hispanic. However most of groups are amenable to the word Latino but prefer being referred to by nationality, such as Peruvian, Guatemalan, Columbian, etc.

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#41158 May 24, 2013
Amanda wrote:
<quoted text>
No I don't think so, Janet Reno worked in the Clinton Administration and she was involved in Waco, Tx. Branch Davidian debacle. So Ruby Ridge was before that. It probably was Bush I administration I remember the FBI and ATF were both faulted and the ROE (rules of engagement)were changed because of what happened on Ruby Ridge. Weaver later sued the federal government and was awarded 4 million dollars...at least that's the way I remember it happening.
==========
Correcto. I've listened to Weaver tell the story more than once at Gun Shows. Randy Weaver is a conservative but a good man. Very rare combination. Usually good and liberal go together.
Susan

United States

#41159 May 24, 2013
Amanda wrote:
<quoted text>
No I don't think so, Janet Reno worked in the Clinton Administration and she was involved in Waco, Tx. Branch Davidian debacle. So Ruby Ridge was before that. It probably was Bush I administration I remember the FBI and ATF were both faulted and the ROE (rules of engagement)were changed because of what happened on Ruby Ridge. Weaver later sued the federal government and was awarded 4 million dollars...at least that's the way I remember it happening.
Ok, I guess I confused Waco Branch Davidian incident with Ruby Ridge because they were fairly close together you would have thought we would have learned a thing or two from what happened in Ruby Ridge. I remember Randy Weaver winning a lawsuit against the government and he should have it was wrong what happened there. I think it was wrong what they did with the Branch Davidians too. David Koresh came into town once a week that was his schedule both FBI and ATF knew that. Koresh bought groceries once a week every week like clock work, why didn't they just arrest him on his way to buy groceries? Would have kept all those people from dying and those poor children being burned to death. Sickening!
TAMARA

Edmond, OK

#41160 May 24, 2013
WMCOL wrote:
<quoted text>
==========
We all are gonna pay one way or the other
Insurance companies that insure disasters raise rates effecting all of us. If School is self-insured or not, taxpayers will pay with increases in property taxes. For instance Allstate inures in Moore. Allstate rates will go up all over the nation, or insurance company would have a lot of trouble staying in business as a for-profit company. The trick is to keep the insurance companies from gouging but yet allow them reasonable profit.
Really are you being serious?
Yes I do what you are saying is so. Insurance rates go up also for the simple excuse of cost of living goes up. Meaning the supplies to rebuild something goes up therefore insurance co. rasise on the also. I know of about 5 major insurance companies that did this starting the 1st of January.
Insurance rates are not the same from state to state. It goes by what causes that state to have so many claims. Like here we have so many causes it is a wonder that most insurance companies still sell in this state. Many companies have stopped selling on the east coast and in Florida.
TAMARA

Edmond, OK

#41161 May 24, 2013
WMCOL wrote:
<quoted text>
==========
More Mexicans than Central and South Americans. When I first moved to California I called Mexicans Hispanics. They resented the name Hispanic and told me they are Mexican not Hispanic. However most of groups are amenable to the word Latino but prefer being referred to by nationality, such as Peruvian, Guatemalan, Columbian, etc.
When talking to someone that I really don't know I don't call the Mexican or what ever else they maybe. But when I have vacationed in Mexico I very rarely here them refer to someone a Hispanics. So I actually don't which is proper.
DoesntMatter

Cushing, OK

#41162 May 24, 2013
This will take me several posts Tamara, so bear with me. I won't see any of your replies until I finish.

We'll start with what the Rainy Day Fund is for ,how it's funded and how it can be used. This is straight from their website.

The official name of what we commonly call the Rainy Day Fund is the Constitutional Reserve Fund. Its creation and purpose is included in Article 10, Section 23 of the Oklahoma Constitution. A deposit is made to the Rainy Day Fund when the state revenue collections for a given fiscal year exceed 100% of the official estimate for that year. The fund is capped at 15% of the General Revenue Fund official estimate for the prior fiscal year.

If state tax revenues in a given fiscal year come in at a level that is less than the total appropriated by the Legislature, the Constitution provides that 3/8 of the Rainy Day Fund can be used to make up that shortfall for that year. Another 3/8 can be used to make up the difference if the official estimate says the next fiscal year will bring in less revenue than the current year. Another 1/4 can be used if the Governor and 75% of the Legislature declare an emergency.

The Rainy Day Fund may be used when:

37.5% Certified Revenue shortfalls in the next fiscal year

When the Governor and Legislature declare an emergency 25%

Revenue Shortfalls experienced in the current fiscal year 37.5

I believe Packing Heat posted that we took $45 million out of the RDF, which was 12.5%. She should have taken the full 25% that could have been used. That would have been $90 million. This money could have been used for state expenses that will occur. Ovetime for police, EMT's, National Guard, etc, plus whatever else the state needed to pay.

So there's $90 million to begin with.

A non-profit organization has been set up for construction of safe rooms for Moore Public Schools. A donation has already been made by Apache Oil and Gas for $500,000 for this purpose. Taken care of.

A funeral home in OKC has offered to take care of every burial expense for the lives lost. This means any life insurance money that would have been used for funeral expenses now can go to the families. Taken care of.

A rental car company has offered rental cars to everyone that needs one for 30 days. This takes care of a lot of people until insurance companies can pay out on cars lost. For anyone that didn't have insurance, well, that is the chance that you take when you don't carry insurance. You accept the responsibility to take care of your own expenses if something happens to your car and taxpayers should not have to foot that bill. Donations however is how it should be done.

Bluecross/Bluesheild announced yesterday that anyone who lost medication or any medical equipment in the tornados, Bluecross/Blueshield would replace it all, member or not.

Kevin Durant Donation $1 million
Thunder Donation $1 million
The NBA and the players' union also announced a joint $1 million pledge


Oklahoma INS. Commissioner has said more than 10,000 insurance claims have already been filed and still counting. So these people did have insurance. A lot of homes were fairly new homes, therefore, required by banks to have insurance. Insurance will cover a lot of the expenses. Taken care of.
DoesntMatter

Cushing, OK

#41163 May 24, 2013
FEMA is not just for low interest loans. They can send clean up supplies, water, give money to the state, etc. According to their website, they've already paid out over $500,000 for this and only 41 applications have been approved. That's a lot of money for 41 applications. Wonder how big that bill is going to be by the time they're done.

A lot of the stores have opened their doors and allowed cleaning supplies to be taken for free, plus cleaning supplies have been pouring into this state and still are. And it was all being done before FEMA ever signed the paperwork, so there is no need for them to pay for this.

Chesapeake Energy -one crane and two front-end loaders -- the kind of heavy machinery normally used to assemble drilling rigs -- are being used to help clear rubble from the disaster. They're being manned by Chesapeake employees, working on the company's dime.

On Tuesday, the company sent trucks up to a distributor in Wichita, Kansas, that normally supplies its workers with gear such as leather gloves, hard hats and safety glasses. It bought every item the distributor had in stock, and plans to distribute them throughout the affected neighborhoods when people can finally return to sift through whatever is left of their homes.

Verizon (VZ, Fortune 500) set up a mobile command center and is offering emergency phones and charging stations. A LaQuinta Inn just west of downtown is giving free rooms to those without a home. The Home Depot (HD, Fortune 500) in Moore, ground zero for the destruction, is now a shelter for homeless pets.

A local branch of T&W Tire has had up to a dozen service trucks in and around the disaster area, offering free fixes for relief vehicles with tires damaged from all the debris. As of Tuesday morning, the trucks had fixed more than 150 vehicles.

The University of Oklahoma housed more than a hundred people Monday night in its dorms, and is serving free food as well. Laptops are set up at the University's headquarters, a nurse is available to treat light injuries, and activities are being run to keep children entertained.

Hundreds of churches are here helping and giving their money to help.

MY FB & Twitter page is FULL of things just like this. Companies & businesses helping, people from all over the world asking where can we send this and that. People are still pouring into this state.

These are just examples that I am giving you to show you what is already being taken care of. This is just a small sample. IF this is just a small sample, I'm pretty damn sure we could take care of this without government help.
Justice

United States

#41164 May 24, 2013
DoesntMatter wrote:
This will take me several posts Tamara, so bear with me. I won't see any of your replies until I finish.
We'll start with what the Rainy Day Fund is for ,how it's funded and how it can be used. This is straight from their website.
The official name of what we commonly call the Rainy Day Fund is the Constitutional Reserve Fund. Its creation and purpose is included in Article 10, Section 23 of the Oklahoma Constitution. A deposit is made to the Rainy Day Fund when the state revenue collections for a given fiscal year exceed 100% of the official estimate for that year. The fund is capped at 15% of the General Revenue Fund official estimate for the prior fiscal year.
If state tax revenues in a given fiscal year come in at a level that is less than the total appropriated by the Legislature, the Constitution provides that 3/8 of the Rainy Day Fund can be used to make up that shortfall for that year. Another 3/8 can be used to make up the difference if the official estimate says the next fiscal year will bring in less revenue than the current year. Another 1/4 can be used if the Governor and 75% of the Legislature declare an emergency.
The Rainy Day Fund may be used when:
37.5% Certified Revenue shortfalls in the next fiscal year
When the Governor and Legislature declare an emergency 25%
Revenue Shortfalls experienced in the current fiscal year 37.5
I believe Packing Heat posted that we took $45 million out of the RDF, which was 12.5%. She should have taken the full 25% that could have been used. That would have been $90 million. This money could have been used for state expenses that will occur. Ovetime for police, EMT's, National Guard, etc, plus whatever else the state needed to pay.
So there's $90 million to begin with.
A non-profit organization has been set up for construction of safe rooms for Moore Public Schools. A donation has already been made by Apache Oil and Gas for $500,000 for this purpose. Taken care of.
A funeral home in OKC has offered to take care of every burial expense for the lives lost. This means any life insurance money that would have been used for funeral expenses now can go to the families. Taken care of.
A rental car company has offered rental cars to everyone that needs one for 30 days. This takes care of a lot of people until insurance companies can pay out on cars lost. For anyone that didn't have insurance, well, that is the chance that you take when you don't carry insurance. You accept the responsibility to take care of your own expenses if something happens to your car and taxpayers should not have to foot that bill. Donations however is how it should be done.
Bluecross/Bluesheild announced yesterday that anyone who lost medication or any medical equipment in the tornados, Bluecross/Blueshield would replace it all, member or not.
Kevin Durant Donation $1 million
Thunder Donation $1 million
The NBA and the players' union also announced a joint $1 million pledge
Oklahoma INS. Commissioner has said more than 10,000 insurance claims have already been filed and still counting. So these people did have insurance. A lot of homes were fairly new homes, therefore, required by banks to have insurance. Insurance will cover a lot of the expenses. Taken care of.
Great Post! Very informative. Wish more states were like Oklahoma!
Amanda

United States

#41165 May 24, 2013
WMCOL wrote:
<quoted text>
==========
Randy Weaver is a conservative but a good man. Very rare combination. Usually good and liberal go together.
This part of your post I couldn't disagree more.
TAMARA

Edmond, OK

#41166 May 24, 2013
DoesntMatter wrote:
This will take me several posts Tamara, so bear with me. I won't see any of your replies until I finish.
We'll start with what the Rainy Day Fund is for ,how it's funded and how it can be used. This is straight from their website.
The official name of what we commonly call the Rainy Day Fund is the Constitutional Reserve Fund. Its creation and purpose is included in Article 10, Section 23 of the Oklahoma Constitution. A deposit is made to the Rainy Day Fund when the state revenue collections for a given fiscal year exceed 100% of the official estimate for that year. The fund is capped at 15% of the General Revenue Fund official estimate for the prior fiscal year.
If state tax revenues in a given fiscal year come in at a level that is less than the total appropriated by the Legislature, the Constitution provides that 3/8 of the Rainy Day Fund can be used to make up that shortfall for that year. Another 3/8 can be used to make up the difference if the official estimate says the next fiscal year will bring in less revenue than the current year. Another 1/4 can be used if the Governor and 75% of the Legislature declare an emergency.
The Rainy Day Fund may be used when:
37.5% Certified Revenue shortfalls in the next fiscal year
When the Governor and Legislature declare an emergency 25%
Revenue Shortfalls experienced in the current fiscal year 37.5
I believe Packing Heat posted that we took $45 million out of the RDF, which was 12.5%. She should have taken the full 25% that could have been used. That would have been $90 million. This money could have been used for state expenses that will occur. Ovetime for police, EMT's, National Guard, etc, plus whatever else the state needed to pay.
So there's $90 million to begin with.
A non-profit organization has been set up for construction of safe rooms for Moore Public Schools. A donation has already been made by Apache Oil and Gas for $500,000 for this purpose. Taken care of.
A funeral home in OKC has offered to take care of every burial expense for the lives lost. This means any life insurance money that would have been used for funeral expenses now can go to the families. Taken care of.
A rental car company has offered rental cars to everyone that needs one for 30 days. This takes care of a lot of people until insurance companies can pay out on cars lost. For anyone that didn't have insurance, well, that is the chance that you take when you don't carry insurance. You accept the responsibility to take care of your own expenses if something happens to your car and taxpayers should not have to foot that bill. Donations however is how it should be done.
Bluecross/Bluesheild announced yesterday that anyone who lost medication or any medical equipment in the tornados, Bluecross/Blueshield would replace it all, member or not.
Kevin Durant Donation $1 million
Thunder Donation $1 million
The NBA and the players' union also announced a joint $1 million pledge
Oklahoma INS. Commissioner has said more than 10,000 insurance claims have already been filed and still counting. So these people did have insurance. A lot of homes were fairly new homes, therefore, required by banks to have insurance. Insurance will cover a lot of the expenses. Taken care of.
I understand what you are saying with this post. But isn't fema for the ones that had no insurance and will need loans to get back on their feet. Fema is there to give people loans at low rate of interest.
I agree people should have been responsible to have protected themselves with insurance. But even then people have added expenses and may need these loans.
DoesntMatter

Cushing, OK

#41167 May 24, 2013
Like previous Team Rubicon operations, the operation in Oklahoma will focus on low-income neighborhoods. "We're there to make homes somewhat livable again," Verdin said. That includes removing debris and muck out of homes, boarding up broken windows, covering broken roofs with tarps, and securing doors and walls.
"For example, if you have a single mother with children, even if there's no power or running water, we can make the home habitable so they can stay there and start piecing their lives back together," Verdin said.
Once Team Rubicon's crew in Moore assesses the help and resources needed, veteran volunteers from around the country will fly in, courtesy of 150 plane tickets donated by Southwest Airlines. Team Rubicon also said it will reimburse the driving costs for authorized veteran and non-veteran volunteers who live within 350 miles of Moore who wish to help out.
TAMARA

Edmond, OK

#41168 May 24, 2013
DoesntMatter wrote:
FEMA is not just for low interest loans. They can send clean up supplies, water, give money to the state, etc. According to their website, they've already paid out over $500,000 for this and only 41 applications have been approved. That's a lot of money for 41 applications. Wonder how big that bill is going to be by the time they're done.
A lot of the stores have opened their doors and allowed cleaning supplies to be taken for free, plus cleaning supplies have been pouring into this state and still are. And it was all being done before FEMA ever signed the paperwork, so there is no need for them to pay for this.
Chesapeake Energy -one crane and two front-end loaders -- the kind of heavy machinery normally used to assemble drilling rigs -- are being used to help clear rubble from the disaster. They're being manned by Chesapeake employees, working on the company's dime.
On Tuesday, the company sent trucks up to a distributor in Wichita, Kansas, that normally supplies its workers with gear such as leather gloves, hard hats and safety glasses. It bought every item the distributor had in stock, and plans to distribute them throughout the affected neighborhoods when people can finally return to sift through whatever is left of their homes.
Verizon (VZ, Fortune 500) set up a mobile command center and is offering emergency phones and charging stations. A LaQuinta Inn just west of downtown is giving free rooms to those without a home. The Home Depot (HD, Fortune 500) in Moore, ground zero for the destruction, is now a shelter for homeless pets.
A local branch of T&W Tire has had up to a dozen service trucks in and around the disaster area, offering free fixes for relief vehicles with tires damaged from all the debris. As of Tuesday morning, the trucks had fixed more than 150 vehicles.
The University of Oklahoma housed more than a hundred people Monday night in its dorms, and is serving free food as well. Laptops are set up at the University's headquarters, a nurse is available to treat light injuries, and activities are being run to keep children entertained.
Hundreds of churches are here helping and giving their money to help.
MY FB & Twitter page is FULL of things just like this. Companies & businesses helping, people from all over the world asking where can we send this and that. People are still pouring into this state.
These are just examples that I am giving you to show you what is already being taken care of. This is just a small sample. IF this is just a small sample, I'm pretty damn sure we could take care of this without government help.
Interesting!
Justice

United States

#41169 May 24, 2013
DoesntMatter wrote:
FEMA is not just for low interest loans. They can send clean up supplies, water, give money to the state, etc. According to their website, they've already paid out over $500,000 for this and only 41 applications have been approved. That's a lot of money for 41 applications. Wonder how big that bill is going to be by the time they're done.
A lot of the stores have opened their doors and allowed cleaning supplies to be taken for free, plus cleaning supplies have been pouring into this state and still are. And it was all being done before FEMA ever signed the paperwork, so there is no need for them to pay for this.
Chesapeake Energy -one crane and two front-end loaders -- the kind of heavy machinery normally used to assemble drilling rigs -- are being used to help clear rubble from the disaster. They're being manned by Chesapeake employees, working on the company's dime.
On Tuesday, the company sent trucks up to a distributor in Wichita, Kansas, that normally supplies its workers with gear such as leather gloves, hard hats and safety glasses. It bought every item the distributor had in stock, and plans to distribute them throughout the affected neighborhoods when people can finally return to sift through whatever is left of their homes.
Verizon (VZ, Fortune 500) set up a mobile command center and is offering emergency phones and charging stations. A LaQuinta Inn just west of downtown is giving free rooms to those without a home. The Home Depot (HD, Fortune 500) in Moore, ground zero for the destruction, is now a shelter for homeless pets.
A local branch of T&W Tire has had up to a dozen service trucks in and around the disaster area, offering free fixes for relief vehicles with tires damaged from all the debris. As of Tuesday morning, the trucks had fixed more than 150 vehicles.
The University of Oklahoma housed more than a hundred people Monday night in its dorms, and is serving free food as well. Laptops are set up at the University's headquarters, a nurse is available to treat light injuries, and activities are being run to keep children entertained.
Hundreds of churches are here helping and giving their money to help.
MY FB & Twitter page is FULL of things just like this. Companies & businesses helping, people from all over the world asking where can we send this and that. People are still pouring into this state.
These are just examples that I am giving you to show you what is already being taken care of. This is just a small sample. IF this is just a small sample, I'm pretty damn sure we could take care of this without government help.
Really good job on the posts. This needs to be plastered on the internet and youtube letting people know how Oklahoma responds to a natural disaster. People helping people and getting it done immediately without the inefficiencies of a bloated bureaucracy like our federal government. This is awesome!

Let FOX News know I doubt the MSM would be interested!
TAMARA

Edmond, OK

#41170 May 24, 2013
DoesntMatter wrote:
FEMA is not just for low interest loans. They can send clean up supplies, water, give money to the state, etc. According to their website, they've already paid out over $500,000 for this and only 41 applications have been approved. That's a lot of money for 41 applications. Wonder how big that bill is going to be by the time they're done.
A lot of the stores have opened their doors and allowed cleaning supplies to be taken for free, plus cleaning supplies have been pouring into this state and still are. And it was all being done before FEMA ever signed the paperwork, so there is no need for them to pay for this.
Chesapeake Energy -one crane and two front-end loaders -- the kind of heavy machinery normally used to assemble drilling rigs -- are being used to help clear rubble from the disaster. They're being manned by Chesapeake employees, working on the company's dime.
On Tuesday, the company sent trucks up to a distributor in Wichita, Kansas, that normally supplies its workers with gear such as leather gloves, hard hats and safety glasses. It bought every item the distributor had in stock, and plans to distribute them throughout the affected neighborhoods when people can finally return to sift through whatever is left of their homes.
Verizon (VZ, Fortune 500) set up a mobile command center and is offering emergency phones and charging stations. A LaQuinta Inn just west of downtown is giving free rooms to those without a home. The Home Depot (HD, Fortune 500) in Moore, ground zero for the destruction, is now a shelter for homeless pets.
A local branch of T&W Tire has had up to a dozen service trucks in and around the disaster area, offering free fixes for relief vehicles with tires damaged from all the debris. As of Tuesday morning, the trucks had fixed more than 150 vehicles.
The University of Oklahoma housed more than a hundred people Monday night in its dorms, and is serving free food as well. Laptops are set up at the University's headquarters, a nurse is available to treat light injuries, and activities are being run to keep children entertained.
Hundreds of churches are here helping and giving their money to help.
MY FB & Twitter page is FULL of things just like this. Companies & businesses helping, people from all over the world asking where can we send this and that. People are still pouring into this state.
These are just examples that I am giving you to show you what is already being taken care of. This is just a small sample. IF this is just a small sample, I'm pretty damn sure we could take care of this without government help.
I remember hearing when Joplin was hit that so many supplies were sent that they had to say stop. I don't know what was done with excess.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Citizen Sound-Off Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Election Who do you support for U.S. Senate in West Virg... (Oct '10) 1 hr bacon hater 102,250
Election Who do you support for U.S. Senate in Georgia i... (Oct '10) 4 hr pointing out the ... 112,533
Election Who's got your vote in the Pennsylvania Attorne... (Oct '14) Sat Native Landlord 9
Election Who's got your vote for Congress in Virginia's ... Fri Johnny Cristian 1
Election Tennessee Hunting Rights Amendment (Oct '10) Fri Huh 8,717
Election The "English is the Official Language of Oklaho... (Oct '10) Oct 18 Traveler 11,309
Election Who do you support for Governor in Wisconsin in... (Oct '10) Oct 16 Leat Cha 7,078
More from around the web