GPS tracking of car without warrant c...

GPS tracking of car without warrant contested | The Columbus Dispatch

There are 76 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Jan 20, 2011, titled GPS tracking of car without warrant contested | The Columbus Dispatch. In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

Two men accused in a string of home-invasion robberies in Franklin County last year are trying to get the evidence thrown out because deputy sheriffs tracked them by placing a GPS device on their car without a warrant.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Columbus Dispatch.

First Prev
of 4
Next Last
Gary Kost

Raleigh, NC

#62 Jan 21, 2011
In his own statement Joseph Scott, one of the defendants attorneys says "a reasonable person does not contemplate a comprehensive mapping of the totality of their movements, including the location of each stop and the duration of the trip, will be monitored and recorded around the clock for a period of nine days."
In my opinion, a "reasonable" person doesn't break into homes and terrorize the occupants with weapons while stealing their property.
These kids lost their chance to be defended as "reasonable".
victum

United States

#63 Jan 21, 2011
The article doesn't say how families were terrorized-guns to their heads and threatened to be killed-Locked in bathrooms while they took their hard earned stuff -even their car.Robbed 6 families and 2 weeks later killed a poor innocent family dog!And they don't deserve long jail sentences?Put yourself in the victums shoes and do the right thing please!
Gary

Columbus, OH

#64 Jan 21, 2011
I like how all you solid freedom loving Americans,give up your 4th amendment! If they were suspects,why not get a warrant? Sorry,they need to throw out the GPS evidence.
funny stuff

Sherwood, OR

#65 Jan 21, 2011
I always get a kick out of people who keep complaining about liberals yet they support the government, which is the police. Idiots who say I want government out of my life yet cheerlead for the police, which is government. Remember when they attach a little bug under your car who you going to cry to? The police? Ahahahahaah. Be careful what you so called conservatives ask for!
Gary

Columbus, OH

#66 Jan 21, 2011
Daily Customer wrote:
<quoted text>
I have, and I can't think of any. Care to enlighten me?
How about a ticket in your mailbox for speeding,when you passed a car on the road? The GPS tracks and records your speed also.Your a suspect for any crime,you might have been in the neighborhood of! Your proximity to the crime(because of the GPS) makes you a suspect!
freeloader

Canal Winchester, OH

#67 Jan 21, 2011
GPS tracking such as this can save lives!
The ACLU hasn't shown sensitivity to the dangers the public is exposed to by persons such as those arrested. They never have cared about the welfare of the public.
They really have to have a wild immagination to call an exterior tracking device an unreasonable search and seizure. If these criminals really were interested, they would probably have spotted the GPS tracking device with very little effort.
We should use more GPS units, not less. I don't see the need for a court order, either. The GPS isn't in someones home. It is outside a vehicle used on a public thoroughfare.
Voltiare

Columbus, OH

#68 Jan 21, 2011
What's to stop me from placing a GPS tracker on my enemy's car, in a public parking lot, and then tracking their every move?
Reader

Eustis, FL

#69 Jan 21, 2011
whatever
John Thayer

Belgrade, MT

#70 Jan 21, 2011
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commerce_Clause

The original purpose of tracking anything was of a federal origin for taxing interstate commerce. Although I doubt trafficing in drugs, or robbing banks actually counts as an "interstate" activity - I believe that this one might require a Federal warrant. The protections of the 4th amendment should protect "local citizens" from this kind of "Search and Seizure", based on the original intent of the founding framers to protect Citizens from this kind of Government "invasion of property".

I think it could be argued that a "trespass" was committed on the property of the folks in this artical, and unless a proper warrant was issued, then the simple protections of the 4th and 5th amendments to the Constutional Laws granted concerning should be seriously considered. This amounts to evidence gathered due to "unreasonable" invasion, and search thereof, of private property.
Daily Customer

Mount Vernon, OH

#71 Jan 22, 2011
Gary wrote:
<quoted text>
How about a ticket in your mailbox for speeding,when you passed a car on the road? The GPS tracks and records your speed also.Your a suspect for any crime,you might have been in the neighborhood of! Your proximity to the crime(because of the GPS) makes you a suspect!
As already pointed out, the GPS simply takes the place of a human being, who could have followed that car around all they wanted. It wasn't like a phone tap that listens in on private conversation, it merely tells where you go on the PUBLIC streets. I just don't think it's use tramples any particular right guaranteed by the Constitution.
hamburger pimp

Columbus, OH

#72 Jan 22, 2011
Daily Customer wrote:
<quoted text>
I have, and I can't think of any. Care to enlighten me?
The government sometimes has funny ideas about what is a crime. Someday an administration may get into power that is as radical as what people on here imagine Obama's regime to be and YOU may be its target for owning the wrong type of gun (or any gun, period), visiting the wrong website, etc. At that point I think you'll gain an appreciation of the Bill of Rights.
Sterling Silver

Columbus, OH

#73 Jan 22, 2011
hamburger pimp wrote:
<quoted text>
The government sometimes has funny ideas about what is a crime. Someday an administration may get into power that is as radical as what people on here imagine Obama's regime to be and YOU may be its target for owning the wrong type of gun (or any gun, period), visiting the wrong website, etc. At that point I think you'll gain an appreciation of the Bill of Rights.
Or having the "wrong" religion...similar to 1930s Germany shall we say.
Daily Customer

Mount Vernon, OH

#74 Jan 23, 2011
hamburger pimp wrote:
<quoted text>
The government sometimes has funny ideas about what is a crime. Someday an administration may get into power that is as radical as what people on here imagine Obama's regime to be and YOU may be its target for owning the wrong type of gun (or any gun, period), visiting the wrong website, etc. At that point I think you'll gain an appreciation of the Bill of Rights.
You can pre-suppose any scenario you can dream up. Folks said the same thing about Bush/Cheney with the Patriot Act and few other things. When it comes down to it, I don't see anyone's rights being trampled as a result of anything the government does - the American people are way too smart to allow it. And I am a Libertarian who just returned from a CCW class - another law that has loosened citizens rights, not restricted them.
Gary

Columbus, OH

#75 Jan 24, 2011
Daily Customer wrote:
<quoted text>
As already pointed out, the GPS simply takes the place of a human being, who could have followed that car around all they wanted. It wasn't like a phone tap that listens in on private conversation, it merely tells where you go on the PUBLIC streets. I just don't think it's use tramples any particular right guaranteed by the Constitution.
And what if the suspects weren't driving the vehicle.A GPS can't tell whose driving,but hey,you go ahead and give up your rights!
clintonville hippie

Columbus, OH

#76 Jan 24, 2011
Daily Customer wrote:
<quoted text>
You can pre-suppose any scenario you can dream up. Folks said the same thing about Bush/Cheney with the Patriot Act and few other things. When it comes down to it, I don't see anyone's rights being trampled as a result of anything the government does - the American people are way too smart to allow it. And I am a Libertarian who just returned from a CCW class - another law that has loosened citizens rights, not restricted them.
You might want to look up "libertarian" in the dictionary. But then again, there are about as many definitions of what it means to be a libertarian as there are libertarians. At any rate, your faith in the government and the collective intelligence of the American people is touchingly naive.
hamburger pimp

Columbus, OH

#77 Jan 24, 2011
Urgh. Gottverdammte Topix software. Let me try that again:

You might want to look up "libertarian" in the dictionary. But then again, there are about as many definitions of what it means to be a libertarian as there are libertarians. At any rate, your faith in the government and the collective intelligence of the American people is touchingly naive.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 4
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

GPS Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News New lifetime GPS tracking for old sex offenders... May '17 Geri 1
News Columbus man indicted for murder of Tokes Apr '17 Oliver Canterberr... 6
News Best phone to track your kids? -- OrlandoSentin... (Jun '07) Feb '17 positronium 25
News GPS ankle bracelet company grows rapidly in Ind... (Dec '16) Dec '16 Geebmas 2
News Mobile Phone Tracking - Trace Someone Online Us... (Feb '08) Jul '16 sarahyao 410
News Prosecutor charges man who shot at George Zimme... (Jun '15) Feb '16 Melanie 2
News GPS tracking now available in Putnam for 'vulne... (Dec '15) Dec '15 DarnetSadie 1
More from around the web