How many BTUs in a gallon of gas?

How many BTUs in a gallon of gas?

Bud

Oceanside, CA

#1 Jun 2, 2007
Is the hybrid actually using less gas, or is this the same set-up as the air system that injects air into the exhaust. The emissions from the heads of an engine are the same. The amount of polution is the same. The only difference I can see is the Hybrid is it uses the stored kinetic energy from the batteries, then switches to the engine. The same amount of BTUs are burned.And eventually the batteries will have to be replaced. Check the price of batteries, divide by the number of miles driven, and i think it will cost the same. Hope this makes sense.

Since: Jun 07

West Memphis, AR

#2 Jun 2, 2007
Hey Bud you Genius a BTU stands for British Thermal Unit. I has nothing to do with what you are attempting to say. It measures propane and natural gases in BTU's burn volumes.
Bud

Oceanside, CA

#3 Jun 10, 2007
OK-SO. Roze What is the burn-Kinetic energy - power measurement of gasoline?
MPMARTIN

Mercer Island, WA

#4 Jun 10, 2007
Roze wrote:
Hey Bud you Genius a BTU stands for British Thermal Unit. I has nothing to do with what you are attempting to say. It measures propane and natural gases in BTU's burn volumes.
Actually, Bud posed a valid although obtuse question, A BTU is the amount of energy needed to raise a pound of water one degree. It doesn't matter the source of the energy, whether gasoline or the heat generated by electric motor or propane. However, there are too many variables in his question to answer it accurately,eg; what is the octane of the gallon of gas, how is it being burned (air-fuel ratio etc). But he did raise an interesting question, and one that I'm sure is being studied by energy/automotive scientist every where.
MPMARTIN

Mercer Island, WA

#5 Jun 10, 2007
MPMARTIN wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, Bud posed a valid although obtuse question, A BTU is the amount of energy needed to raise a pound of water one degree. It doesn't matter the source of the energy, whether gasoline or the heat generated by electric motor or propane. However, there are too many variables in his question to answer it accurately,eg; what is the octane of the gallon of gas, how is it being burned (air-fuel ratio etc). But he did raise an interesting question, and one that I'm sure is being studied by energy/automotive scientist every where.
Correction; I meant to say heat instead of "energy" two diff things
Bud

Oceanside, CA

#6 Jun 11, 2007
MPMARTIN wrote:
<quoted text>
Correction; I meant to say heat instead of "energy" two diff things
I just know that the MPG of a civic hybrid doesnt get any better mileage than a regular civic. I'm not saying one is better than the other. When my wife bought a new civic, a regular one, the milage was better than a hybrid. Maybe the battery weight had something to do with it. Cant say. With the hybrid it was recomended that the batteries be renewed every five years. At that time it would cost $5000.00.
skibum

United States

#7 Jun 22, 2007
How many BTU in a gallon of regular gas when burned in a internal combustion engine. Maybe someone can fill in all the figures for me. If x BTU in a gallon of gas how many BTU to develope one horsepower and then how many horsepower to move a specified weight a specified distance.
It seems to me the only way to get better gas milage from our cars is to reduce weight, rolling resistance and wind resistance. Will the american public give up their comforts for the few miles per gallon? While on the subject, I am not at all in favor of ethanol.
Chuck

Chelsea, AL

#8 Sep 18, 2009
theres 125,000 btu/gallon of gasoline. Theres 3415 btu/kw. Therefore one gallon of gas =36.6 kilowatts.
Mark

Phelan, CA

#9 Feb 22, 2011
One US Gallon of regular gasoline = 125,000 BTUs
RUBEN bANUELOS

United States

#10 Jun 11, 2011
FROM THIS 125000 BTU , ONLY 20 T0 30% IS USED IN REAL POWER, THE REST IS WASTED IN THE FORM OF HEAT , FRICTION AND UNBURNED GASOLINE,ETC.
Dan Knak

Hastings, MN

#11 Aug 1, 2011
While the central question is BUT's per gallon, the real question is how does that relate to mileage of an automobile?
The answer, assuming a car, is found in solving for the following:
1. Efficiently of conversion of gasoline to combustion, i.e. the engine
2. The total friction (friction in the motor, rolling friction, and wind resistance)
3. The amount of energy (BTU’s) it takes to achieve acceleration at a given rate
4. Top speed desired over time.
From there we should be able to calculate the theoretical maximum MPG of for a given design.
Knowing this if you want to increase MPG you must decrease #2.,#3, or #4 or increase #1.
while government may wish for some number crazy number, physics don’t lie.
Ron Reeves

Portland, TX

#12 Feb 14, 2012
If 1 gal of gasoline produces 125,000 BTUs for on avarage $3.65 and Natural gas cost $2.50 per 1,000,000 BTUs than why or we not using Natural gas to fuel our cars.
Jim Brown

Valparaiso, IN

#13 Feb 15, 2012
I have been writing my congressman and everyone else complaining because we don't use natural gas for fuel. This government can't get an energy policy passed. How are we going to solve our problems with a government that doesn't work
Ron Reeves wrote:
If 1 gal of gasoline produces 125,000 BTUs for on avarage $3.65 and Natural gas cost $2.50 per 1,000,000 BTUs than why or we not using Natural gas to fuel our cars.
HCWADE

Tarboro, NC

#14 Nov 16, 2012
Jim Brown wrote:
I have been writing my congressman and everyone else complaining because we don't use natural gas for fuel. This government can't get an energy policy passed. How are we going to solve our problems with a government that doesn't work
<quoted text>
They have not worked for us in a long time. Right, Left, it makes no difference,their on the same team. I'm glad that more of us worker ants are waking up. Their all in someone else s pocket. I'm not sure but, I do not think that natural gas can be trucked, I think it has to be piped.
brown7228

Hobart, IN

#15 Nov 15, 2014
skibum wrote:
How many BTU in a gallon of regular gas when burned in a internal combustion engine. Maybe someone can fill in all the figures for me. If x BTU in a gallon of gas how many BTU to develope one horsepower and then how many horsepower to move a specified weight a specified distance.
It seems to me the only way to get better gas milage from our cars is to reduce weight, rolling resistance and wind resistance. Will the american public give up their comforts for the few miles per gallon? While on the subject, I am not at all in favor of ethanol.
About 123.000 BTU in a gallon of gas. 1000 cubic of natural gas equals about 7.8 gallons of gasoline. So 1 gal. of Gasoline cost about 2.80. The same equivalent to 7.8 gallons of gasoline cost about 4.60 today. The natural gas produces about 40% less pollution so you tell me why 15 years ago we didn't start changing to natural gas is beyond me. After all that's why they want better gas mileage.

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