People in Cville React to Supreme Cou...

People in Cville React to Supreme Court Rulings

There are 82 comments on the NBC29 Charlottesville story from Jun 24, 2013, titled People in Cville React to Supreme Court Rulings. In it, NBC29 Charlottesville reports that:

The Supreme Court ruled the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional Wednesday.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC29 Charlottesville.

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Nancy in Staunton

Salem, VA

#1 Jun 26, 2013
YES to the Supreme Court ruling today!
Nancy in Staunton

Salem, VA

#2 Jun 26, 2013
YES to the Supreme Court ruling today
dude

Scottsville, VA

#3 Jun 26, 2013
Sicko's are happy everywhere! Now they can marry a freak just like them!
god-fearer

Palmyra, VA

#4 Jun 26, 2013
Thank you Ms Weed for telling the truth. NOTHING really, actually, has changed for Virginians.

Oh, we can be glad with hope! and that is great! but at the same time, just yesterday, Virginia's Attorney General said that he would use the power of his Office to maintain ancient, discriminatory, and UN-Constitutional Virginia laws - called 'crimes against nature' laws - that has criminalized gay and lesbian Virginians for a long time.

And Professor Schragger, thanks for your insight, but we'd be glad if you'd spend time litigating against the institution where you work - the University of Virginia - and the Commonwealth of Virginia, that openly discriminate in ways that harm gay and lesbian individuals and families.

My family was not able to attend the rally today because we were assisting frail elderly family member. We have several frail elderly family members with whom we have some duties of care. Both UVA and the Commonwealth blatantly and openly discriminated against my frail elderly family members because we are not a heterosexual household. My frail elderly family members were denied long term care coverage when we requested it, because UVA and the Commonwealth don't respect our family as a family. They consider the frail elderly family members - our parents - to be 'strangers' to us.

This is the harm that the SCOTUS decision on DOMA found: discrimination humiliates, burdens, and harms the human dignity of gay and lesbian families, and further harms them with inequitable access to benefits.

UVA and the Commonwealth humiliated my family calling our parents the equivalent of worthless strangers to us, of no importance, of no moral account, or no value. And, denied real benefits - long term care coverage - which they HAVE IN FACT needed, and will need in the future.

Dear Professor, please rally the brilliant folks in the School of Law to find a remedy for the humiliation and oppression of gay and lesbian employees at UVA and of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and all other gay and lesbian individuals and families in Virginia.

Thank you.

Since: Oct 12

Charlottesville, VA

#5 Jun 26, 2013
I don't understand why homosexuals just don't get married any way and go about their business, setting an example, until the rest of us catch up? It is not like they are forbidden from loving or living with each other. They are not seriously persecuted anywhere (objecting to their lifestyle is not persecution).

They could start an organization that conducts marriages in states that do not recognize them, issuing them certificates, etc. Why not? Do they really need governments to sanctify and validate their relationships? Does anybody?

This makes me think there is more going on here than they let on; this really isn't about equality nor is it about love. I know some think that is what this is about but I think the ultimate goal is making religious organizations into "hate groups" and thus able to be persecuted and subject to lawsuits if they object to homosexuality by evoking the 14th amendment. Separation of church and state apparently doesn't apply here...

That is not very tolerant.
Sulu

Waynesboro, VA

#6 Jun 26, 2013
Set phasers to "Fabulous!!"
Greene Liberal

United States

#7 Jun 26, 2013
Its a great day for equality for this country. Our country's principles hold that all of us are equal under the law. This is a victory for every American. President Kennedy said something about when one of us is not free none of us are.

Since: Oct 12

Charlottesville, VA

#8 Jun 26, 2013
Greene Liberal wrote:
Its a great day for equality for this country. Our country's principles hold that all of us are equal under the law. This is a victory for every American. President Kennedy said something about when one of us is not free none of us are.
Forty years ago the feminist far left claimed marriage was a form of "slavery". Now, after some strange metaphysical metamorphosis that hasn't been fully explained, marriage is a "civil right".

When did the slavery of marriage become a civil right?

It is an honest question that deserves an honest response from those who identify with the progressive left.
Whatever

Charlottesville, VA

#9 Jun 26, 2013
Mr-Butcher wrote:
<quoted text>
Forty years ago the feminist far left claimed marriage was a form of "slavery". Now, after some strange metaphysical metamorphosis that hasn't been fully explained, marriage is a "civil right".
When did the slavery of marriage become a civil right?
It is an honest question that deserves an honest response from those who identify with the progressive left.
40 years ago we were busy loosing someone else's civil war for all the wrong reasons in the hinterlands of a far away continent. Here we are doing that all over again, and several times over for good measure. Maybe, just maybe--and try to use your imagination here--overtime the left has evolved a more humane view on certain issues. Unlike you clever warmongers on the right. Imagine that--40 years to "metaphsical metamorphosis" (whatever that means)--from a point of view that's wrong to one that's right. You should really try it sometime. Might cut down on your Metamucil budget.
Cville101

Ashburn, VA

#10 Jun 26, 2013
Mr-Butcher wrote:
I don't understand why homosexuals just don't get married any way and go about their business, setting an example, until the rest of us catch up? It is not like they are forbidden from loving or living with each other. They are not seriously persecuted anywhere (objecting to their lifestyle is not persecution).
They could start an organization that conducts marriages in states that do not recognize them, issuing them certificates, etc. Why not? Do they really need governments to sanctify and validate their relationships? Does anybody?
This makes me think there is more going on here than they let on; this really isn't about equality nor is it about love. I know some think that is what this is about but I think the ultimate goal is making religious organizations into "hate groups" and thus able to be persecuted and subject to lawsuits if they object to homosexuality by evoking the 14th amendment. Separation of church and state apparently doesn't apply here...
That is not very tolerant.
I'm sorry but this is very ignorant of the issue that was before the Supreme Court. DOMA explicitly denies married, civil unionized and domestic partnershipped same-sex couples more than 1,100 federal benefits currently reserved as special privileges to opposite-sex married couples. This included Social Security Benefits, housing and food stamps, Veteran's benefits (including pensions and survivor benefits), tax breaks, estate rights, and many other important protections afforded to legally married couples.

There is clearly an issue of civil rights. When you deny a segment of citizens equal protections under law, it is by default a civil rights issue. Regardless of your personal or religious views on the issue of same sex marriage, you can not deny basic rights to groups of people simply because you disagree with their life style; the same way you can't deny an interracial couple's marriage rights because you disagree with interracial marriage.
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#11 Jun 26, 2013
Mr-Butcher wrote:
I don't understand why homosexuals just don't get married any way and go about their business, setting an example, until the rest of us catch up? It is not like they are forbidden from loving or living with each other. They are not seriously persecuted anywhere (objecting to their lifestyle is not persecution).
They could start an organization that conducts marriages in states that do not recognize them, issuing them certificates, etc. Why not? Do they really need governments to sanctify and validate their relationships? Does anybody?
This makes me think there is more going on here than they let on; this really isn't about equality nor is it about love. I know some think that is what this is about but I think the ultimate goal is making religious organizations into "hate groups" and thus able to be persecuted and subject to lawsuits if they object to homosexuality by evoking the 14th amendment. Separation of church and state apparently doesn't apply here...
That is not very tolerant.
you're clueless, the suit won today was because a woman was being taxed on her deceased partner's (of 40+ years) estate.
Roberta Williamson

Wirtz, VA

#13 Jun 26, 2013
Mr-Butcher wrote:
I don't understand why homosexuals just don't get married any way and go about their business, setting an example, until the rest of us catch up? It is not like they are forbidden from loving or living with each other. They are not seriously persecuted anywhere (objecting to their lifestyle is not persecution).
They could start an organization that conducts marriages in states that do not recognize them, issuing them certificates, etc. Why not? Do they really need governments to sanctify and validate their relationships? Does anybody?
This makes me think there is more going on here than they let on; this really isn't about equality nor is it about love. I know some think that is what this is about but I think the ultimate goal is making religious organizations into "hate groups" and thus able to be persecuted and subject to lawsuits if they object to homosexuality by evoking the 14th amendment. Separation of church and state apparently doesn't apply here...
That is not very tolerant.
Perhaps these ceremonies do not take place at your church, but here in Charlottesville they are conducted at churches, including St. Paul's Episcopal. Many LGBT families do have commitment ceremonies and celebrate with their parents, other family members, and friends. Sanctifying that relationship is done. The government VALIDATING that relationship by recognizing heterosexual and homosexual couples as equal and affording them the same privileges of inheritance, hospital visitation, living arrangements, social security benefits, military benefits, insurance rates, and tax rates, among other issues would be wonderful. LGBT parents can still be forcibly separated from their biological children, and each other. People can be fired from their jobs simply because they are LGBT. Housing discrimination prevents same gender couples from living together in some localities. LGBT rights in Virginia ARE at risk. Lastly, as a supporter of LGBT rights, I will promise you that I am one person who will not tolerate the diminishment of religious organizations into hate groups. Some have started on that road by their own actions by preaching intolerance. Working from within our church communities will turn the tide and bring about a better country. Yes, I know that is not what you meant, but if auxiliary church schools and groups are asked to reduce discrimination, YOUR rights are protected. YOUR church will not be forced by the government to recognize what you think are sinful relationships. YOUR religious rights will remain intact. Heterosexual, white, wage-earning, religious, conservative people are entitled to their pursuit of happiness. And I hope more of them can learn tolerance so we can get along.

Since: Oct 12

Charlottesville, VA

#14 Jun 26, 2013
Roy g Biv wrote:
<quoted text>cant they just pretend to be "room mates"
Isn't that what married people do?

Is not monogamy unnatural?

Since: Oct 12

Charlottesville, VA

#15 Jun 26, 2013
Roberta Williamson wrote:
<quoted text>
Perhaps these ceremonies do not take place at your church, but here in Charlottesville they are conducted at churches, including St. Paul's Episcopal. Many LGBT families do have commitment ceremonies and celebrate with their parents, other family members, and friends. Sanctifying that relationship is done. The government VALIDATING that relationship by recognizing heterosexual and homosexual couples as equal and affording them the same privileges of inheritance, hospital visitation, living arrangements, social security benefits, military benefits, insurance rates, and tax rates, among other issues would be wonderful. LGBT parents can still be forcibly separated from their biological children, and each other. People can be fired from their jobs simply because they are LGBT. Housing discrimination prevents same gender couples from living together in some localities. LGBT rights in Virginia ARE at risk. Lastly, as a supporter of LGBT rights, I will promise you that I am one person who will not tolerate the diminishment of religious organizations into hate groups. Some have started on that road by their own actions by preaching intolerance. Working from within our church communities will turn the tide and bring about a better country. Yes, I know that is not what you meant, but if auxiliary church schools and groups are asked to reduce discrimination, YOUR rights are protected. YOUR church will not be forced by the government to recognize what you think are sinful relationships. YOUR religious rights will remain intact. Heterosexual, white, wage-earning, religious, conservative people are entitled to their pursuit of happiness. And I hope more of them can learn tolerance so we can get along.
Too much hysterical blabbering and blind assumptions to even try to respond to.

Let this expression go to show that emotion should never trump reason.

Since: Oct 12

Charlottesville, VA

#16 Jun 26, 2013
huck wrote:
<quoted text>
you're clueless, the suit won today was because a woman was being taxed on her deceased partner's (of 40+ years) estate.
and Huck you are clueless if you don't think this has bigger implications...

When did it become a faux pas to question current cultural events?

Since: Oct 12

Charlottesville, VA

#17 Jun 26, 2013
Cville101 wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm sorry but this is very ignorant of the issue that was before the Supreme Court. DOMA explicitly denies married, civil unionized and domestic partnershipped same-sex couples more than 1,100 federal benefits currently reserved as special privileges to opposite-sex married couples. This included Social Security Benefits, housing and food stamps, Veteran's benefits (including pensions and survivor benefits), tax breaks, estate rights, and many other important protections afforded to legally married couples.
There is clearly an issue of civil rights. When you deny a segment of citizens equal protections under law, it is by default a civil rights issue. Regardless of your personal or religious views on the issue of same sex marriage, you can not deny basic rights to groups of people simply because you disagree with their life style; the same way you can't deny an interracial couple's marriage rights because you disagree with interracial marriage.
1,100 federal benefits, huh?

So this is about money?

I thought it was about love??
Roy g Biv

Harrisonburg, VA

#18 Jun 26, 2013
Mr-Butcher wrote:
<quoted text>
1,100 federal benefits, huh?
So this is about money?
I thought it was about love??
no..it's not about love....into about Benny fits....low co Pays trump the need for being able to love in the open, especially those federal benefits
Roy g Biv

Harrisonburg, VA

#19 Jun 26, 2013
Mr-Butcher wrote:
<quoted text>
Forty years ago the feminist far left claimed marriage was a form of "slavery". Now, after some strange metaphysical metamorphosis that hasn't been fully explained, marriage is a "civil right".
When did the slavery of marriage become a civil right?
It is an honest question that deserves an honest response from those who identify with the progressive left.
as long as a straight man is involved in it it is slavery. Now if it was involving a interracial disabled transgender lesbian or commonly known as IDTL , then it would remain acceptable and a path to freedom and a civil right...come on Butch
Hmmmmm

Charlottesville, VA

#20 Jun 26, 2013
Mr-Butcher wrote:
<quoted text>
1,100 federal benefits, huh?
So this is about money?
I thought it was about love??
Stop being an idiot. An actual marriage recognized by the state as such comes with a ton of legal privileges and responsibilities. You were ignorant of the situation. You had a very brief, discussion board sized eduction on it. So now you're just being an idiot.

Since you profess to not understand, and at the same time show that you don't understand, then its time for some advanced citizenship. Go learn about all of the things that actually make it an issue. It would be time better spent than continuing to your ridiculous drivel here.
hondacivic

Staunton, VA

#21 Jun 26, 2013
Mr-Butcher wrote:
<quoted text>
1,100 federal benefits, huh?
So this is about money?
I thought it was about love??
It is more than the money. You think that it's fair for someone gay that is serving in the military protecting your freedom, that their spouse (even if they were married in a state that allows same sex marriage) isn't allowed to live on base with them?

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