31 charter schools risk closure in 20...

31 charter schools risk closure in 2011 | The Columbus Dispatch

There are 94 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Jun 28, 2010, titled 31 charter schools risk closure in 2011 | The Columbus Dispatch. In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

It is improbable, but not impossible: At the same time that 31 Ohio charter schools could be ordered to close, another 41 could be gearing up to open.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Columbus Dispatch.

closer

Zanesville, OH

#23 Jun 28, 2010
Close them all !!! Get back to the basics with the limited resorces we have and get all the kids a good education. How can we have these statistics where 50% of the kids can barly read and write . Lets use the money to help all the kids , not just a few. Whats going to happen to these kids later in life without a proper education ? What will happen to America ?
Joe

Pleasantville, OH

#24 Jun 28, 2010
Ashes82 wrote:
Another at-risk school, Columbus Preparatory Academy, opened in 2004. It won't be on a closing list again, said Principal Chad Carr, because it has rapidly improved.
"Great things have happened here," he said. "We've become better teachers and are creating better learners."
(Mr.Carr also recieved an educator of the year award last year)
Ashes 82, you can't use facts to reason with these NEA stooges who want to continue the government run money pits. They could care less about kids getting a good education as long as they keep their jobs, stop school voucher programs, and pass the levies every election year.
talking head

Columbus, OH

#25 Jun 28, 2010
they can't be as bad as columbus public
Reader

Columbus, OH

#26 Jun 28, 2010
Cartman wrote:
A primary justification for charter schools was to help the poor students in urban districts escape inadequate public schools. Instead they created a system where a few greedy individuals can set up fake institutions of learning, swindle those they claim to help, deprive kids of any chance to learn and walk off with pockets full of money. What could be wrong with continuing this process when it has been a proven failure?
Reality is, the overwhelming majority are operated by non-profits. A few have excelled, some are really rotten (and have either closed or will get there shortly), and the majority are merely mediocre. In short, they have mimicked the district schools as far as quality goes.

The question that goes unanswered in the never-ending debate of district vs charter (vs private), is HOW do we most effectively improve access to quality education for the majority of children? In central Ohio we should be alarmed and outraged that MOST children attend schools or a district that is on the bottom of the heap with regard to any rational indicators of education--test scores, graduation rate, employment or college or other higher learning following high school. Sorry to say, we are not.

“Fire in my Bones and”

Since: Apr 10

The sweet taste of Kerosene

#27 Jun 28, 2010
Finally a few people with some sense!! CPS is a hole, my children will not attend their schools, period. I would move first. I love my city, but my children come first.

“Fire in my Bones and”

Since: Apr 10

The sweet taste of Kerosene

#28 Jun 28, 2010
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
Reality is, the overwhelming majority are operated by non-profits. A few have excelled, some are really rotten (and have either closed or will get there shortly), and the majority are merely mediocre. In short, they have mimicked the district schools as far as quality goes.
The question that goes unanswered in the never-ending debate of district vs charter (vs private), is HOW do we most effectively improve access to quality education for the majority of children? In central Ohio we should be alarmed and outraged that MOST children attend schools or a district that is on the bottom of the heap with regard to any rational indicators of education--test scores, graduation rate, employment or college or other higher learning following high school. Sorry to say, we are not.
I agree with this also. Columbus schools are FAR worse than Cleveland schools (by test scores and graduation rate, MUCH worse).
Reader

Columbus, OH

#29 Jun 28, 2010
DMR wrote:
One of the biggest problems in K-12 public schools is the parents are NOT involved in their child's education. They make no effort to communicate with the child's teacher, or come for parent-teacher meetings,(even when asked) they make no effort to academically support their child, doing such things as making sure the students homework is done and helping with class projects.
You sound like a teacher, and I don't want to discount your personal experience, but I would point out that research tends to disagree with you. Generally the universal with regard to parent involvement, across socio-economic levels, is the at-home support, such as homework supervision. There tends to be more of this at lower grade levels and with reading rather than math--although when schools provide explicit guidance in what it is that they want parents to do with regards to math, they are more than willing to follow through. Parents continue at-home involvement in upper-grades, although it takes a different form, including more general conversation than specific oversight, as is age-appropriate. If there is an differential across socio-economic levels, LOWER INCOME parents tend to be more heavily involved. Where UPPER INCOME parents tend to excel is in at-school activities that are tangential to academic success (booster clubs and the like)--having little proven relationship to improved learning.

Overall, in my experience as a parent, schools are not terribly interested in parent involvement unless it is carefully coralled into things that don't impact teachers in their classrooms. In some instances they are overtly hostile to parents--regarding them as "the problem" with their students. Personally, I have always attended conferences (otherwise the teachers talk bad about you), but after more than a decade of doing so, I would suggest that they are a seriously outdated means of communication and frequently viewed by teachers as an obligation rather than a tool. Perhaps it is time to reframe the conversation from "how can we make parents come in for conferences?" to "how can we improve the stream of two-way conversation with parents?" Maybe you could start by talking with parents.
Reader

Columbus, OH

#30 Jun 28, 2010
Ashes82 wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree with this also. Columbus schools are FAR worse than Cleveland schools (by test scores and graduation rate, MUCH worse).
I'm not certain that is accurate. But, in any case, we should be far more concerned than we are. Too many are happy to just pull out, but, while I appreciate the need to take care of the education of one's own children--we do not have sufficient capacity to provide a decent education across the board. We should all of us--charter and district, city and suburbs--be screaming about this. We pay a heavy cost in the end.
Hooked on Fonics

United States

#31 Jun 28, 2010
Not all charters are poor. I taught at one that did fairly well: Horizon Science Academy. I would however, say that there are far too many of them, particularly, if you look at many of their enrollment numbers. And yes, it is possible that some people open them just to make money which is pretty horrible. I don't think closing them all is a good solution and it is an injustice to those that have performed well. I would however, limit the number of new ones in a given community, especially if enrollment for an entire school is under 200 kids. The cost of busing alone (which the public district in that area would have to support) does not justify creating many disparate schools.
Joe

Pleasantville, OH

#32 Jun 28, 2010
Three documentaries on this topic that are out or coming out soon might be worth watching:
Waiting For Superman:http://tinyurl.com/28 o85m7
The Lottery:http://thelotteryfilm. com/
The Cartel:http://www.thecartelmov ie.com/
closer

Zanesville, OH

#33 Jun 28, 2010
i did it wrote:
too bad the State isn't as concerned with Columbus City Schools as they are the charters. Someone should be shutting down CCS.
It's sad that I live in Clintonville and can't even send my children to CCS because the schools are deplorable. So, I shell out over 20K to send them to the Catholic Schools, and it's so costly becayuse we aren't Catholic.
I wish Clintonville had their own district.
"i did it "- One of the reasons the Catholic Schools are so good is that the famlys that go there are a like minded group that cares about thier childern and makes a strong investment in thier future. The schools arnt baby sitting services the childern are required to pass before they move on . Also the childern are required to use strict codes of disipline , if these are things you belive in , join the church , you would be welcome.

“Fire in my Bones and”

Since: Apr 10

The sweet taste of Kerosene

#34 Jun 28, 2010
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm not certain that is accurate. But, in any case, we should be far more concerned than we are. Too many are happy to just pull out, but, while I appreciate the need to take care of the education of one's own children--we do not have sufficient capacity to provide a decent education across the board. We should all of us--charter and district, city and suburbs--be screaming about this. We pay a heavy cost in the end.
You seem to enjoy a little research as I do, have a look between Cleveland and Columbus, particularly test scores, I was shocked. From k-12 they are killing CPS. I am a younger parent (28 kids are 3-5-7) I am not quite sure where to start with a reform on our Public school systems. I am quite certain that with the way CPS is now, that it would never be ready for my children, but hopefully my childrens children may get a chance at a decent public school education. I myself went to Big Walnut and never had to deal with CPS.
Not Accountable To Voters

Park Forest, IL

#35 Jun 28, 2010
Ashes82 wrote:
I am a proud parent of a child who goes to a charter school. Our local "Public" school is Weinland park. Please actually read this info to see why my daughters go to Columbus Prep. Academy.
I have pulled this from CPS website.
On the 2009 OAT, 26% of Weinland Park Elementary School Grade 3 students met or exceeded standards in Math. This is lower than the Columbus City School District average of 66%, and lower than the Ohio state average of 81%.
(*26% that is HORRIBLE! Do you REALLY expect me to accept this sub-standard education for my child?)
On the 2009 OAT, 21% of Weinland Park Elementary School Grade 3 students met or exceeded standards in Reading. This is lower than the Columbus City School District average of 60%, and lower than the Ohio state average of 77%.
(*Once again REALLY??? I should just settle for this?)
On the 2009 OAT, 14% of Weinland Park Elementary School Grade 5 students met or exceeded standards in Science. This is lower than the Columbus City School District average of 41%, and lower than the Ohio state average of 71%.
On the 2009 OAT, 14% of Weinland Park Elementary School Grade 5 students met or exceeded standards in Social Studies. This is lower than the Columbus City School District average of 41%, and lower than the Ohio state average of 62%.
(*14% that in its self should be enough said.)
WHY because I am lower income, and can't live in Dublin or New Albany, should my child get such a sub-standard education? If Columbus Public can't teach my children I will find someone who can. Not ALL charter schools are crooks. Research Mosaica Education, the group that runs my daughters school. She tested at 81% and Higher on her Iowa Basic Skill Test last year (1st grade) and that is Nationally not just Locally. Her school is amazing, Her teachers are amazing, and her little sister is beyond excited to go to Kindergarten this year. Weinland Park Elem. is listed as one of the top 20 worst schools in the state, and I will be damned if she is going to be another statistic. The teachers there speak ebonics, the principal seems to care less about the the whole situation, there is a park out side where 2 shootings have happened in the last 8 months......NO THANKS CPS. My SCHOOL, MY CHOICE. My income should NOT designate my childs education. Once again not all charter schools are doing poorly, our just opened another branch in New Albany, called Cornerstone Academy. They bus from everywhere in Franklin County, and are a lifesaver. I KNOW my children will succeed.
Again, why should public funds support an educational institution that is not accountable to the voters at the ballot box? Keep in mind, other people's your tax dollars in addition to your own, support your child's education. For this reason, the voters (by way of the ballot box) have every right to determine the direction of your child's educational institution. That doesn'y exist through charter school, but it should. This isn't about what you teach at home, because there is no tax money in the home classroom. Now, if you want your child to get a private education, your welcome to make that work. But do not expect the public to pay for it.
Jeff

Westerville, OH

#36 Jun 28, 2010
You can tell this program is supported by RepuliCANTs, all they do is take the money and run, huh John Kasich?????
John Blutarsky

Columbus, OH

#37 Jun 28, 2010
Jeff wrote:
You can tell this program is supported by RepuliCANTs, all they do is take the money and run, huh John Kasich?????
Someone call the WAAAAAAmulance.
doh

Aruba

#38 Jun 28, 2010
Not Accountable To Voters wrote:
<quoted text>
Again, why should public funds support an educational institution that is not accountable to the voters at the ballot box? Keep in mind, other people's your tax dollars in addition to your own, support your child's education. For this reason, the voters (by way of the ballot box) have every right to determine the direction of your child's educational institution. That doesn'y exist through charter school, but it should.
You seem riled up about a political issue. I won't say education isn't a political issue, and I agree there has to be some accountability in education. But since when does the average voter know what's best in education? Why should I trust the future of children to the average schmo's opinion? However, the voters do control Columbus Public, and we've all seen the crappy results from that. If Columbus Public was any good at all, there wouldn't be a need for charter schools! Those schools can barely control their students, let alone teach them. But charter schools can give the students the opportunity to recieve more individual attention, in smaller classes, with material that is more applied for their interests. The charter system is so new, I say let's give it time to collect some real data.

“Fire in my Bones and”

Since: Apr 10

The sweet taste of Kerosene

#39 Jun 28, 2010
Not Accountable To Voters wrote:
<quoted text>
Again, why should public funds support an educational institution that is not accountable to the voters at the ballot box? Keep in mind, other people's your tax dollars in addition to your own, support your child's education. For this reason, the voters (by way of the ballot box) have every right to determine the direction of your child's educational institution. That doesn'y exist through charter school, but it should. This isn't about what you teach at home, because there is no tax money in the home classroom. Now, if you want your child to get a private education, your welcome to make that work. But do not expect the public to pay for it.
UNLIKE the public city school, a charter school gets shut down if it does not preform well. A public school can continue to have horrible performance, and still keep its doors open. I own my home, I vote for the levies (which charter schools do not get any peice of), and my taxes got to all sorts of programs which I disagree with. One that I do agree with is a school voucher system. I am glad that you feel that because I can't afford a private school, my child should get a sub standard education. But I certianly don't.
CCS supporter

New Albany, OH

#40 Jun 28, 2010
i did it wrote:
too bad the State isn't as concerned with Columbus City Schools as they are the charters. Someone should be shutting down CCS.
It's sad that I live in Clintonville and can't even send my children to CCS because the schools are deplorable. So, I shell out over 20K to send them to the Catholic Schools, and it's so costly becayuse we aren't Catholic.
I wish Clintonville had their own district.
It's sad that you live in Clintonville and aren't aware of the strong public schools serving Clintonville. My children attended Indian Springs Elementary in a self-contained gifted classroom for 4th and 5th grades, are ranked in the top 5% of their classes at Columbus Alternative HS, and are being recruited by highly selective colleges.
MMK

Indianapolis, IN

#41 Jun 28, 2010
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm not certain that is accurate. But, in any case, we should be far more concerned than we are. Too many are happy to just pull out, but, while I appreciate the need to take care of the education of one's own children--we do not have sufficient capacity to provide a decent education across the board. We should all of us--charter and district, city and suburbs--be screaming about this. We pay a heavy cost in the end.
Actually that is not accurate. CPS has greater graduation rates than Cleveland schools. I have knowledge of many Cleveland high schools that graduate below 30-40 %. The high school I teach in in CPS is well above 90 % consistently. I can speak first hand since I attended a Cleveland high school and now teach in CPS and know the differences. There are great high schools an schools for that matter in CPS. Unfortunatly they are not in the entrie district. CPS has numerous teachers that go above and beyond for their students and school. Once again when an articl comes out like this the public blames a few teachers they had a bad experience with. I would invite anyone not in the district to come and try to do what many teachers do everyday. Many students I have had leave CPS and go to charter schools come back to CPS evetually less prepared and still failing.
Not Accountable To Voters

Park Forest, IL

#42 Jun 28, 2010
doh wrote:
<quoted text>
You seem riled up about a political issue. I won't say education isn't a political issue, and I agree there has to be some accountability in education. But since when does the average voter know what's best in education? Why should I trust the future of children to the average schmo's opinion? However, the voters do control Columbus Public, and we've all seen the crappy results from that. If Columbus Public was any good at all, there wouldn't be a need for charter schools! Those schools can barely control their students, let alone teach them. But charter schools can give the students the opportunity to recieve more individual attention, in smaller classes, with material that is more applied for their interests. The charter system is so new, I say let's give it time to collect some real data.
Folks, wanting the right to determine the direction or usage of public funds, via the ballot box, is not a "political issue." Nobody mentioned a political party or group. Rather, as a citizen, I have every right to step in the ballot box to say if we should or shouldn't move ahead with charter schools. In my view, charter schools circumvent the checks and balances of public funding.

Now, as for some "shmo's opinion"? OK, lets remember we are talking about the usage of public funds. This means some "shmo's opinion" has to be factored into your plans, even if you do not agree with the "shmo's opinion" If people want to control their child's education without factoring the public's opinion, then they need to find a private school for their child, period! But don't expect the public to pay for your child's private education.

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