School Year Gets Longer In The Fall |...

School Year Gets Longer In The Fall | Ohio News Network (ONN)

There are 60 comments on the 10TV WBNS story from Feb 9, 2010, titled School Year Gets Longer In The Fall | Ohio News Network (ONN). In it, 10TV WBNS reports that:

Snow can mean that school is out for Ohio students, but the number of calamity days a district can claim will drop this fall.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at 10TV WBNS.

First Prev
of 3
Next Last

Since: Jan 10

United States

#1 Feb 10, 2010
While I agree students needs schooling, I sure don't agree with less calamity days in Ohio. Simply cut the number of days schools out for observation of this and that. We are only talking DAYS here Governor Strickland. Don't EVEN think about flip-flopping the traditional summer vacation for winter vacation. I've seen that discussed here and there.
Hope

Marysville, OH

#2 Feb 10, 2010
Considering at most schools the last week of school, or at least the last 3 days are just like goof off days why make the year longer. Also it is silly to risk our children lives to go to school when the weather is dangerous.

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#3 Feb 10, 2010
Here comes another levy to pay the teachers for the extra days of teaching per year! LOOK OUT!!!!!
neut32

Newark, OH

#4 Feb 10, 2010
I think that if you make longer school days or more school days in a year, you will burn the kids out and you will have alot more dropouts. Kids need the break to refresh and get ready for the next school year.

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#5 Feb 10, 2010
I definitely agree that making the school day longer is not a good idea! A lot of the kids who are bussed to school often get up at 5 AM and get home at 5 PM and then have homework to do. This is also if they don't play sports or extra-curriculars that require practice after school.

It's just too long of a day for many students to handle and be able to function well enough to learn.
Lamont108

Sharon, PA

#6 Feb 10, 2010
Getting rid of the two calamity days is a big mistake. What is the point in forcing the schools to go into June? As the one poster said when schools have to make days up in June it becomes just goof off days because the students as well as the teachers are ready for a break.
I also laugh at the guy from Columbus City School District saying that it is Ohio and it snows so we should just deal with it and kids should go to school. That is easy to say when your district is a city and you don't have to deal with Township Roads in the country that are only wide enough for one car, and that's when it has not snowed. I wonder if he even knows what a Township Road is, and I like to make him drive one after about 5 inches of snow. We'll see then if he thinks we should just deal with it. It is not worth risking the lives of the children when the temp. outside is usually 20 degrees or colder.
Eskimo Mom

Cloverdale, OH

#7 Feb 10, 2010
I agree with Zimmerman. School districts need flexibility in making up calamity days, not having them reduced. Most school superintendants don't take school closings lightly. Instead of more instructional days, what about teachers making packets of homework available online or print them out & give students an extended deadline to turn it in as part of their grade?

Strickland keeps forgetting that June can be hot enough to close a school for excessive heat. In addition, will graduation ceremonies have to be moved to mid-June to prevent interference with calamity day makeups. What about the kids that have internships, jobs, etc. lined up that start the 1st part of June? This policy change can cause more headaches than it will solve

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#8 Feb 10, 2010
It does not seem like an attempt to keep kids in school so much as it seems like an attempt to make Ohio schools look more like Asian schools in terms of number of days required. Adding 3 days is almost laughable. Plus I think it is funny that the people making the laws for the schools by and large have not ever even been in a classroom to know what goes on. As another poster stated, adding the 3 days is like adding goof days
Funny

United States

#9 Feb 10, 2010
Quality over quantity. The Governor is wrong here in toying with the calamity days. But that is what happens when politicians think they are educators. Wait till, heaven forbid, there is a serious accident 'cause schools feel the pressure to send kids to school with all the other crazy drivers out there. We already had two students walking in Hillard hit by a car due to bad weather.

Most parents will likely pull their kids out of school in June for planned vacations and miss make up days. It happens. This means school districts will have to schedule finals and exams as if there are no make up days to appease the community.

Once seniors leave and all finals have been given, there isn't a lot of motivation by the remaining students or parents to continue.

Extending the school day is good, but only if schools hire additional staff for focused tutoring or enrichment. But we already have a private tutoring after-school industry - should the schools take over that? Plus this cuts into sports which is important to many students and good for physical health. Try to eliminate football and see what happens at school board meetings.

If Ohio Schools are ranked 5th in the nation as Strickland says, why does Strickland and Fingerhut want to drastically mess with a good thing? I'd prefer the summer be reserved for additional classes or learning beyond the classroom. Courses in physical ed, health, typing, outdoor activities, vocational and service learning could all be in the summer schedule rather than try to extend the year. Oh wait, most districts do this already!

Studies (Vanderbilt) show that the extended school year has serious diminishing returns and is not cost effective.
lostachild

Westerville, OH

#10 Feb 10, 2010
They should NOT be cutting back calamity days!!! I think all that's going to do is create dangerous situations when the weather gets bad, because the schools are going to force the issue of getting their days in.

Last week Friday (when we had our first BIG snow), Olentangy did NOT release early and on the way to pick my son up I saw multiple buses having trouble turning corners, I saw an accident and people were having issues getting INTO the school drive (there is a slight hill). That was just ridiculous -- all in the name of getting another two hours of school in. Education is important but there's more to life than that -- NO CHILD'S LIFE is worth getting a few extra hours of "education" in... And if the state thinks education is more important than a child's life, then they are REALLY screwed up and they need to get their priorities straight!!

How about focusing on OTHER aspects or cutting some of the "fluff" from the school days??
mr_vanhorn

Xenia, OH

#11 Feb 10, 2010
The folks who have commented on "Hope"s observation about the last few days being "goof off" days don't understand his/her point. It's not that the added (make up) days become goof off days. The last one to two weeks of school, whenever they are and whether they are regularly scheduled days or make up days, are goof off days no matter what. Every class in every school at every grade level that I've ever heard of runs out of stuff to teach long before they run out of days to teach them. Have you ever heard of a teacher squeaking the final in on the very last day of school?

If anything, they should add calamity days, because we're just wasting two weeks every year, anyway.*Or*, we could actually use our time wisely, and begin teaching more art, physical education, and communication classes, which have all suffered in recent years at the hands of science and math.

We don't have a problem of spending too little time in school; we are spending time in school that we are wasting.
Bill Smith

Charleston, SC

#12 Feb 10, 2010
Sending your children to a government school is the same thing as child abuse.
cturtle

Newark, OH

#13 Feb 10, 2010
Sounds like this should be voted on. We vote for school levies, why not this?
Teacher in SE Ohio

Marietta, OH

#14 Feb 10, 2010
We are on day 8 of "missed" days. We started school the second week of August and are done the first week of June. My classroom does not have A/C. I don't mind going more in the summer, but I really don't think the students are learning that much when the temperature in my classroom is over 100 degrees. When our county is on a Level 2 due to snow, those days should be excused. The first time someone has a bus accident b/c they went in he snow, you will see a ton of lawsuits. Those people making these laws need to consider all of the schools in the South. The roads are full of hills. In the northern part of the state, it is flat. Come ride with me for one day and you will reconsider this article.
Teacher

Columbus, OH

#15 Feb 10, 2010
If this happens, there better be an increase in pay to match the extra work. Teachers are already over worked. No one else would work for free.
Irritated

Columbus, OH

#16 Feb 10, 2010
I think that this is the most ignorant thing. Gov Stictland if you want to make all these changes then you need to make some changes within the schools and the state. First you need to hire extra city workers to get these side streets cleared better so the buses can get down them. Then you need to have seatbelts installed in all the buses in every distict not to mention ALL the schools need air conditioning.Its a give and take situation.
Dylieman

Duluth, GA

#17 Feb 10, 2010
Brave the elements and go where you have to go? That's fine for you Harris - risk your own life - but rest assured if the weather is extreme you won't be risking my child's. What an idiotic comment.
North Side Resident

Columbus, OH

#18 Feb 10, 2010
I don't understand why the days are tacked on in June, yet I have to figure out child care arrangements for several days during the school year so Columbus can have "professional development" days on random Wednesdays during the year. There is one on Feb 24 (in two weeks) and another in the middle of May. Seriously, what kind of professional development for teachers is going to happen in May, just a couple weeks before school is out?

As far as Harris' comments, to be fair she is dealing with a district where a large percentage of children live in poverty and many live in single parent homes. When school is closed, where do these children go? Who takes care of them? The children that get free breakfast and lunch, have their parents planned for those extra meals? Too many of the district's children are better off going to school. In comparison, this week is the first time in 15 years that New York City Schools have closed.
Concern for students

Pickerington, OH

#19 Feb 10, 2010
mr_vanhorn wrote:
The folks who have commented on "Hope"s observation about the last few days being "goof off" days don't understand his/her point. It's not that the added (make up) days become goof off days. The last one to two weeks of school, whenever they are and whether they are regularly scheduled days or make up days, are goof off days no matter what. Every class in every school at every grade level that I've ever heard of runs out of stuff to teach long before they run out of days to teach them. Have you ever heard of a teacher squeaking the final in on the very last day of school?
If anything, they should add calamity days, because we're just wasting two weeks every year, anyway.*Or*, we could actually use our time wisely, and begin teaching more art, physical education, and communication classes, which have all suffered in recent years at the hands of science and math.
We don't have a problem of spending too little time in school; we are spending time in school that we are wasting.
Unfortunately, too many people lack a true understanding of this country’s current educational policies. A knowledgeable person would never dare state that too much time is wasted in our schools on both math and science. No Child Left Behind has placed undue burden on students to excel at a multitude of tedious tests. Thanks to NCLB, school administration loads teachers with the weight of securing unrealistic annual yearly progress scores to obtain a State Report Card Designation of Effective or better. By only enforcing annual yearly progress for mathematics and reading in grades three through eight, it is NCLB that has placed the emphasis on mathematics and reading, not school districts. School districts must meet federal goals to earn federal money. Until more parents educate themselves about government policies and demand better for our children from our politicians, the educational system in this country will continue to be determined by “fill-in-the-bubble” or “one-size fits all” testing.
Also, eighth grade students in the United States lag behind Singapore, China, Japan, Korea, England, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovenia, Hong Kong and the Russian Federation in science ( http://nces.ed.gov/timss/table07_3.asp ). In mathematics, our eighth grade students fell behind China, Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, Hungary, England, and the Russian Federation ( http://nces.ed.gov/timss/table07_1.asp ). Math and science are necessary instruction to assist our students for competition in a global economy.
Please take the time to learn about the laws that govern our schools, write to your politicians about your concerns, and make your voice heard on Election Day. Our children need your help!
Concern for students

Pickerington, OH

#20 Feb 10, 2010
North Side Resident wrote:
I don't understand why the days are tacked on in June, yet I have to figure out child care arrangements for several days during the school year so Columbus can have "professional development" days on random Wednesdays during the year. There is one on Feb 24 (in two weeks) and another in the middle of May. Seriously, what kind of professional development for teachers is going to happen in May, just a couple weeks before school is out?
As far as Harris' comments, to be fair she is dealing with a district where a large percentage of children live in poverty and many live in single parent homes. When school is closed, where do these children go? Who takes care of them? The children that get free breakfast and lunch, have their parents planned for those extra meals? Too many of the district's children are better off going to school. In comparison, this week is the first time in 15 years that New York City Schools have closed.
Columbus City School parents are good, hardworking people who are simply trying to survive and help their children prepare for a better life. I also understand many of the parents within the Columbus City School District are living in poverty; however, the concern should always be about students’ safety, not about providing daycare and food during the school day. Students living in poverty often arrive at school without proper clothing and coats. When temperatures are low and the wind is blowing snow, students should not be waiting for buses or walking to school without proper coats, gloves and hats. For those who have stated parents are responsible for clothing their own children, I agree and I realize wonderful resources are available for the poor, but some parents may not know about the resources available to assist those in need. Also, some CCS students may have proper coats but do not wear them because they prepare themselves and younger siblings for school while parents are at work or sleeping because they have just returned from a late shift.

Second, the roads and sidewalks are too hazardous. Students are at risk of falling or getting hit by a car while walking on icy roads because the sidewalks are covered with the snow pushed up on the sidewalks by the plows. I have read that many parents with the flexibility to pick their children up at school found their car stuck on the side of the road near their school in a pile of snow.

In conclusion, I understand the needs of CCS students and parents, but safety should be the number one priority. Even poverty stricken parents can find a few extra dollars to feed their children cereal and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches a few extra times during bad weather. Neighbors can pull together to share in child care to assist with job stress. All risks should be carefully and accurately assessed before CCS students are sent out to face the cold and the hazards of icy roads without any regard for their daycare needs. CCS top priority should be each and every parent holding all their children safe in their arms each night.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 3
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Ohio Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Kasich duels media in NH snowball fight 1 hr Le Jimbo 3
News Ohio comedian mayor facing civil lawsuit, inves... Fri wallsarethin 45
News Ex-DNC head: Kasich-Rubio ticket would scare me... Thu Ritual Habitual 7
News Is Ohio's Hot Dog Cooked? Feb 2 Uncle Buckeye 3
News Tennessee GOP Rep. Fincher to retire Feb 1 ben 1
News BC-OH-Ohio AP Legislative-Elections Preview,ADV... Jan 31 They cannot kill ... 1
News Deadline looming for Obamacare signups Jan 26 Mayor Don 4
More from around the web