Athiests continue to push their radical agenda.

Posted in the New Mexico Forum

First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#1 Oct 27, 2011
"An Alabama school district has been accused of allowing prayers that invoke the name of Jesus during high school football games, according to a complaint filed by a national atheist organization.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation said the Lauderdale County school district has violated the First Amendment by allowing the prayers at Brooks High School"

A single person who chooses to be non-religious can push his or her agenda upon the rest of society with one single complaint, while organization after organization simply roll over and allow this nonsense.

Take a stand, people. Our nation was not meant to governed this way. The rest of us must stand up and fight for OUR rights as well.

The courts are being used as a bullying tactic by anti-American and anti-freedom organizations, contrary to their intended purpose. Defeat judges who allow their courts to be used as a law-making body. Defeat judges who fail to support traditional American values. Defeat judges who rule against common sense and common decency.

Tell individuals who wish to force their agenda upon the rest of us by misusing the courts that we will not stand for it.

http://aclj.org/...

“Liberal Patriot”

Since: Sep 08

Rio Linda, CA

#2 Oct 27, 2011
Quite the right wing Christian nut job if you ask me.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#3 Oct 27, 2011
New Mexican wrote:
Quite the right wing Christian nut job if you ask me.
Damn right! And proud of it!

“Liberal Patriot”

Since: Sep 08

Rio Linda, CA

#4 Oct 27, 2011
3,873 posts since May 10th attest to that. You don't have a life.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#5 Oct 28, 2011
New Mexican wrote:
3,873 posts since May 10th attest to that. You don't have a life.
I didn't know you cared!

(Oh, and not that it matters, because my opposition always likes to "go off" half-cocked with incorrect "facts"..but that's May, 2010..Not "May 10th"... Or are we to believe that you've posted almost 800 times since September, which is a higher number of posts per month than I, which would indicate that by your standards, you have even less of a life than I. Just sayin'!)

“come to Richie,, ”

Since: Nov 10

4-corners man

#6 Oct 28, 2011
oh athiest are ok, they just want there religion to be the big dog! Its in the DNA hahahaha, ohoh,

Since: Jun 08

Farmington NM

#7 Oct 29, 2011
Are the pre game prayers sanctioned or led by the coach? You know how it is, your not on the team if your not praying with us? Which prayers was it? Was there a muslim prayer too? Was there a buddhist prayer? Was some fried chicken and cigarettes put up as some offering to el diablo?

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#8 Oct 29, 2011
ephotonic wrote:
Are the pre game prayers sanctioned or led by the coach? You know how it is, your not on the team if your not praying with us? Which prayers was it? Was there a muslim prayer too? Was there a buddhist prayer? Was some fried chicken and cigarettes put up as some offering to el diablo?
Nah, just simple prayers to the God that over 80 percent of Americans profess belief in.

Same as those offered by the founders of our nation, and as mentioned in some of our founding documents.

No need for a Muslim prayer or Buddhist prayer, since those are not the traditional religions of our nation.

And you may pray to El Diablo, but do so in private. Over 80 percent of us don't have any interest in your "god".(Though I have no doubt that most liberals are led by such an entity.)

The problem with you libs is that you want to make everything far too complicated in order to obfuscate your destruction of traditional America.

A simple, non-denomination prayer is no offense, except to people like you, who are in the tiny minority. Changing tradition so suit one athiest is ridiculous.

Since: Jun 08

Farmington NM

#9 Oct 29, 2011
Cary L Nickel wrote:
<quoted text>
Nah, just simple prayers to the God that over 80 percent of Americans profess belief in.
Tyranny of the majority over the minority.
Cary L Nickel wrote:
<quoted text>Same as those offered by the founders of our nation, and as mentioned in some of our founding documents.
Christian slave holders.
Cary L Nickel wrote:
<quoted text>No need for a Muslim prayer or Buddhist prayer, since those are not the traditional religions of our nation.
So what? Keep your traditions to yourself.
Cary L Nickel wrote:
<quoted text>And you may pray to El Diablo, but do so in private. Over 80 percent of us don't have any interest in your "god".(Though I have no doubt that most liberals are led by such an entity.)
The problem with you libs is that you want to make everything far too complicated in order to obfuscate your destruction of traditional America.
So you want Chilean miners to pray in private but you want to pray in the open at public schools and events.
Cary L Nickel wrote:
<quoted text>A simple, non-denomination prayer is no offense, except to people like you, who are in the tiny minority. Changing tradition so suit one athiest is ridiculous.
Being forced to pray before a city council meeting like they do every week in Farmington is offensive. If I want to go to church I'll go to church. Like you say, all anyone can ask is that you pray in private and not subject others to your beliefs. Its what the founders intended.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#10 Oct 29, 2011
ephotonic wrote:
<quoted text>
Tyranny of the majority over the minority.
<quoted text>
Christian slave holders.
<quoted text>
So what? Keep your traditions to yourself.
<quoted text>
So you want Chilean miners to pray in private but you want to pray in the open at public schools and events.
<quoted text>
Being forced to pray before a city council meeting like they do every week in Farmington is offensive. If I want to go to church I'll go to church. Like you say, all anyone can ask is that you pray in private and not subject others to your beliefs. Its what the founders intended.
There is no tyranny is non-denominational prayer. If that represents tyranny to you, the tyranny is only in your mind.

What Christian slave holders? Slavery is illegal in the United States.

Keep your atheism and anti-religious attitude to yourself, I'm trying to pray here. I'll pray for you, too.

Why would I want Chilean miners to pray in private? If they want to pray, they can pray. I have no problem with that. If Chilean miners show up at my son's school or at some local event, and they want to pray, they have my support and I will join them in prayer.

If you are offended by prayer, the problem is entirely yours.

Apparently, you would be offended by the founding fathers of our nation as well, as they said prayers in public. Again, your problem.

I have no desire, nor need, to tolerate an anti-religious attitude. Keep your anti-religion to yourself.

Since: Jun 08

Farmington NM

#11 Oct 30, 2011
Half of the US founding fathers were slave holders which was legal at the time. Slavery was also accepted, even promoted in some cases by the church at the time. Some of the founding fathers were quite liberal in recognizing the need to keep religion out of government. After all they just set up a government by election and not by the church and royalty.

Organized religion is motivated to brainwash believers at an early age to promote their particular system of belief. When public schools or public meetings promote or participate in religious ceremony, it infringes on everyone's rights to freedom of thought. Its coercion.

I didnt have a major problem with religion in public until some people flew planes into buildings in the name of religion. The whole middle east thing, fighting over whether israel is a jewish state or an islamic state really opened my eyes to the problem of organized religion. I no longer want any part of it.

You totally illustrate the problem: you want me or anyone else to keep quiet about their particular beliefs in public yet you want to broadcast yours.

Please keep your religion to yourself.

“Liberal Patriot”

Since: Sep 08

Rio Linda, CA

#12 Oct 30, 2011
Cary L Nickel wrote:
<quoted text>
Nah, just simple prayers to the God that over 80 percent of Americans profess belief in.
Same as those offered by the founders of our nation, and as mentioned in some of our founding documents.
No need for a Muslim prayer or Buddhist prayer, since those are not the traditional religions of our nation.
And you may pray to El Diablo, but do so in private. Over 80 percent of us don't have any interest in your "god".(Though I have no doubt that most liberals are led by such an entity.)
The problem with you libs is that you want to make everything far too complicated in order to obfuscate your destruction of traditional America.
A simple, non-denomination prayer is no offense, except to people like you, who are in the tiny minority. Changing tradition so suit one athiest is ridiculous.
Is your god a conservative?

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#13 Oct 30, 2011
ephotonic wrote:
Half of the US founding fathers were slave holders which was legal at the time. Slavery was also accepted, even promoted in some cases by the church at the time. Some of the founding fathers were quite liberal in recognizing the need to keep religion out of government. After all they just set up a government by election and not by the church and royalty.
Organized religion is motivated to brainwash believers at an early age to promote their particular system of belief. When public schools or public meetings promote or participate in religious ceremony, it infringes on everyone's rights to freedom of thought. Its coercion.
I didnt have a major problem with religion in public until some people flew planes into buildings in the name of religion. The whole middle east thing, fighting over whether israel is a jewish state or an islamic state really opened my eyes to the problem of organized religion. I no longer want any part of it.
You totally illustrate the problem: you want me or anyone else to keep quiet about their particular beliefs in public yet you want to broadcast yours.
Please keep your religion to yourself.
Don't know if you've heard the news, but slavery is illegal today.

Your problem with religion because of 9/11 is misguided. Those attacks were perpetuated by Islamists. I thought you would know that.

I have no problem with atheists, or atheism, as long as they don't want to force their beliefs upon the rest of us. No one has to listen to a prayer. If prayer means nothing to an atheist, then it should merely be ignored as empty words. Easily done. Meaning is in the mind of the listener.

I don't go to gay bars and yell out that sodomy is a sin. I expect the same kind of respect for my beliefs.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#14 Oct 30, 2011
New Mexican wrote:
<quoted text>
Is your god a conservative?
Why don't you ask him?

Since: Jun 08

Farmington NM

#15 Oct 30, 2011
Cary L Nickel wrote:
<quoted text>
Don't know if you've heard the news, but slavery is illegal today.
Your problem with religion because of 9/11 is misguided. Those attacks were perpetuated by Islamists. I thought you would know that.
I have no problem with atheists, or atheism, as long as they don't want to force their beliefs upon the rest of us. No one has to listen to a prayer. If prayer means nothing to an atheist, then it should merely be ignored as empty words. Easily done. Meaning is in the mind of the listener.
I don't go to gay bars and yell out that sodomy is a sin. I expect the same kind of respect for my beliefs.
Just pointing out to you again how the founding fathers were human.

Nope, 9/11 proves without a doubt the dangers of organized religion. If you were born in Saudi Arabia you would probably be a frothing islamist.

I'm sure you wouldn't want to sit through say, some sort of wiccan ceremony (which actually might be more interesting). You wouldn't want to sit through some sort of lecture on atheism every time. Or what if you had to kneel and pray to mecca before the meeting? Thats what you are promoting.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#16 Oct 30, 2011
ephotonic wrote:
<quoted text>
Just pointing out to you again how the founding fathers were human.
Nope, 9/11 proves without a doubt the dangers of organized religion. If you were born in Saudi Arabia you would probably be a frothing islamist.
I'm sure you wouldn't want to sit through say, some sort of wiccan ceremony (which actually might be more interesting). You wouldn't want to sit through some sort of lecture on atheism every time. Or what if you had to kneel and pray to mecca before the meeting? Thats what you are promoting.
No.

9/11 proves the dangers of a war-mongering religion in modern times that teaches infidels must be converted or die, and that martyrs will be rewarded with 72 virgins when they arrive at their version of the "great beyond", and that filming the beheading of hostages and then broadcasting same is considered "honorable".

As for wicca, no need to sit through their ceremony, as this is not traditionally a wiccan nation. Same with atheism. Same with Islam.

Regardless of those who wish to alter history in order to fit their agenda, the United States is, indeed, a traditionally Christian nation.

However, If I were visiting a nation that is traditionally Islamic, I would strive to honor their traditions, regardless of my personal beliefs.

I know of no nation that is traditionally wiccan, nor atheistic. But I would again strive to honor the tradition of the nations I visit, if I chose to visit them at all.
Beal Z Bubb

United States

#17 Oct 31, 2011
Science can fly us to the moon. Religion flies us into buildings. QED.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#18 Oct 31, 2011
Beal Z Bubb wrote:
Science can fly us to the moon. Religion flies us into buildings. QED.
Incorrect. Islam flies theirs martyrs into buildings. The rest of the dead are innocent victims of Islam and it's ingrained hatred for all things western.

Since: Jun 08

Farmington NM

#19 Oct 31, 2011
I definitely prefer the main christian message of forgiveness and helping your fellow man to the islam convert or die concept.

However, the convert or die message is fairly compelling for the waring tribes

Since: Jun 08

Farmington NM

#20 Oct 31, 2011
Cary L Nickel wrote:
<quoted text>
Regardless of those who wish to alter history in order to fit their agenda, the United States is, indeed, a traditionally Christian nation.
The constitution does not spell out explicitly that the US is a christian nation. John Adams also wrote to that effect. There is no revision of history.

It was just a matter of germs guns and steel that the native americans and their beliefs (who happened to be here first) were overtaken by the europeans.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

New Mexico Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News New Vietnam War memorial for Las Cruces set to ... Tue Gabe Herrera 1
News Lottery bill transfers unclaimed winnings into ... Mon edilson m silva 1
News Compromise on driver's licenses advances to ful... Mar 23 NM Parent 19
News Martinez prefers to stick to issues (Jun '10) Mar 23 Mr T 6,225
News Say it in six words (Jul '08) Mar 23 Spider 8,657
News Papers of Bill Richardson donated to University... Mar 21 otherpaper 2
Election Who's got your vote in the New Mexico Senate ra... Mar 20 Gorky 18
More from around the web