Missouri Sex Offender Laws: Need to b...

Missouri Sex Offender Laws: Need to be changed?

There are 109 comments on the KFVS12 story from Jan 10, 2008, titled Missouri Sex Offender Laws: Need to be changed?. In it, KFVS12 reports that:

“It doesn't keep you from getting in your car going outside premises. I don't understand why we had the law to begin with”

In some cases, current law can actually make it harder for you to keep tabs on sex offenders in your neighborhood. via KFVS12

Join the discussion below, or Read more at KFVS12.

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Tom

Ballwin, MO

#107 Jul 22, 2012
I am just off of probation in May 2012. What I did was wrong. Now I am trying to rebuild my life. I have a lot of support with family, friends and church. I still have to be careful what I do. I was told if I get arrested for anything I may have to go through this again. I have no desire to go where I was before. My conviction was from internet. I know we are labeled for life. I just want to move forward. The law seems to be to general
Vicki

Olathe, KS

#108 Jul 23, 2012
(Part 1)
I hate to bring up the "elephant in the room" but find it necessary when talking about sex offender registries. The Penn State & Jerry Sandusky crime revelation was the mere tip of the iceberg! Why? Because society has been “groomed” to believe these type situations will not happen as long as we have the sexual offender registry to “protect our children!” Congress mandated it in 2006 and now the states have to finance it or be penalized. Parents think they will be able to readily identify sexual offenders from a list and residency restrictions. Please tell your state and federal lawmakers to re-focus on educating Parents, children and teens about their rights with regard to someone intending on victimizing them. Parents can't be everywhere, although some could be more involved in their children's lives, so educational programs are essential. Remember that 95% of sexual abuse comes from within the family environment.

There are over 763,000 men, women and children, as young as 8 and 10 in some states, across the nation required to register. The "crimes" range from urinating in public, sexting, exposure, false accusations by a soon-to-be ex-wife, angry girlfriend, or spiteful student, viewing abusive or suggestive images of anyone18 years old or younger, solicitation, playing doctor, Romeo and Juliet consensual sexual dating relationships,“allowing a 16 year old girl to perform oral sex on you and a drunken party and you are over 18, rape and incest.

According to Oprah from one of her shows in 2009 there are over 5 MILLION child pornography images transmitted each day. Now, I’m not a mathematician or possess the power to predict the future but, do you think ALL those images are viewed by “convicted child molesters or rapist?” The FBI published a document last year stating their prosecutions were up 2500% for possession of child pornography. The private prison industry is a proponent of more “crimes” being punishable by incarceration in order to meet their 90% fill rate.

According to a report titled “Sex Offender Sentencing in Washington State: Recidivism Rates,” sex offense recidivism was 2.7%; among child victim offenders, 2.3%; and among rapists, 3.9%(Washington State Institute for Public Policy).

Studies conducted by the Minnesota Department of Corrections and the Colorado Department of Public Safety have not shown any correlation between sex offender recidivism and living near schools or parks. In a 16-year period, not one sex offender released from a MN correctional facility had been re-incarcerated for a sex offense in which contact was made with a juvenile victim near a school, park, or daycare center close to his home. On the contrary, there is ample scientific evidence that shows residency laws do interfere with the reintegration of sex offenders into society.
“We’ve taken stable people who have committed a sex crime and cast them out of their homes, away from their jobs, away from treatment, and away from public transportation. It’s just absolutely absurd what these laws have done, and the communities are at greater risk because of it”(Unnamed Iowa Law Enforcement Official).

Vicki
Women Against Registry dot com

Vicki

Olathe, KS

#109 Jul 23, 2012
(Part 2)
“Residence restrictions don’t contribute to public safety. In fact, the consensus of experts in the field of sex offender management supported by available research and experience indicates they do just the opposite. They destabilize offenders, punish their families, and thwart law enforcement efforts to effectively supervise sex offenders, make offender registries less reliable, and mislead communities into believing they’ve discovered a magic bullet for protecting their children”(Secretary Roger Werholtz, Kansas Department of Corrections).
“Jessica’s Law sounds good and is well-intentioned, but it is not supported by research and is severely misguided in its attempt to protect children from sexual abuse... Research has shown that sex offenders in a stable environment (with stable housing, jobs, and social support) are less likely to commit new sex offenses. Residency requirements drastically reduce this stability”(Statement from the Child Molestation Research & Prevention Institute Website).
“Because residency restrictions have been shown to be ineffective at preventing harm to children, and may indeed actually increase the risks to kids, the Jacob Wetterling Resource Center does not support residency restriction laws. Such laws can give a false sense of security while sapping resources that could produce better results used elsewhere”(The Jacob Wetterling Resource Center).
“Residency restrictions do not effectively reduce recidivism. It perpetuates dangerous myths about who sex offenders are and they may in some cases actually increase the likelihood that an offender will commit another sexual offense”(Testimony from Anna Doroghazi, Director of Public Policy and Communication, Connecticut Sexual Assault Crisis Services).
“Research shows that there is no correlation between residency restrictions and reducing sex offenses against children or improving the safety of children. Research does not support the belief that children are more likely to be victimized by strangers at the covered locations than at other places. Residency restrictions were intended to reduce sex crimes against children by strangers who seek access to children at the covered locations. Those crimes are tragic, but very rare. In fact, 80 to 90% of sex crimes against children are committed by a relative or acquaintance that has some relationship with the child and access to the child that is not impeded by residency restrictions. Only parents and caretakers can effectively impede that kind of access. Law enforcement has observed that the residency restriction is causing offenders to become homeless, to change residences without notifying authorities of their new locations, to register false addresses, or to simply disappear. If they do not register, law enforcement and the public do not know where they are living. The resulting damage to the reliability of the sex offender registry does not serve the interests of public safety. There is no demonstrated protective effect of the residency requirement that justifies the huge draining of scarce law enforcement resources in the effort to enforce the restriction. The categories of crimes included in the restriction are too broad, imposing the restriction on many offenders who present no known risk to children in the covered locations”(Iowa County Attorneys Association, Statement on Sex Offender Residency Restrictions).
“The system is broken. It’s overwhelmed and I think the public is starting to realize that...You can’t paint sex offenders with a broad brush”(John Walsh, father of Adam Walsh who was kidnapped and murdered but not sexually abused yet has a bill named after him).

Vicki
Women Against Registry dot com
just me

Lenexa, KS

#110 Jul 29, 2012
I am a current offender. My crime is 2nd degree statutory rape a class c felony. I was 21 at the time my victim was 16. I knew my victim for years and had never had a sexual or deviant thought toward her until the incident. I wasnt in the best place in my life and turned toward my victim as someone to lean on and confide in (we had always had a brother/sibling type relationship) during this time are talk went from normal conversation to gradually explicit conversation. I eventually raped my victim (consensual sex) after we stopped talking she went to her sister who went to the proper authorities and i turned myself in and plead guilty was sentenced to 5 years sis probation and life registration. Its the only think ive ever done wrong in my life (no drugs alcohol theft etc.) What i did was wrong and i believe i truly deserved the 5 years of probation for my offense. But at the same time to take away my chance to ever really b a part of my sons life outside of the house is a lil extreme. Ya no daycares i completely agree wit but i cant go to any athletic or academic events for his whole life. What did he do to deserve that. (Side note) my victim was no virgin lost her virginity at 15 to a 25 year old married fireman whom was off scotch free as well as another male 23 while she was 15. Fair....no...but thats the law i guess
Victim

United States

#111 Jan 10, 2013
Growing up, I was sexually abused multiple times by different people. My offenders were all teen family members.

The victims on here that are bashing the offenders need to get counseling, and find Jesus. You can move on. I have forgiven my offenders and believe that everyone makes mistakes.

To be honest the emotional and verbal abuse from my step father affected me more than the sexual abuse ever did. Because of it I repeatedly find myself in abusive relationships. Im getting councelling and firgive him, too.

As a victim I feel that offenders should be given another chance.
The Lost Family

Saint Louis, MO

#112 Mar 10, 2013
1994 I was accused of a sex crime concerning my nephew, during what was a family huge dispute. I had just finish Jr. R.O.T.C. in high school and was ready to join the Marine Corps. Under the advice of my lawyer I had a jury trial instead of a judge’s trial here in the state of Missouri. After the closing arguments and 3 and a half hours of deliberation, I was found guilty. Weeks later during sentencing the judge said that had I chosen a Judges trial, she would have acquitted me on the charges because she believed that the accuser was coursed into making false statements. But since the trial was over, she did the only thing left within her power to do. She sentenced me to what is known here in the state of Missouri as S.I.S. Probation. She also mentioned that according to my character, I didn't even fit the profile.
After I completed my probation, I was told that the conviction would no longer be on my public record and case file would be sealed. So I got on with my life. I still had to register, but I got some job skills together and a career going, I met a lady and we fell in love together, we got married and had children. And in almost 20 years I have not had any other accusers make such statements against me. Then in 2006 when the new laws were ushered in, I lost my job, I lost my home, I lost my car. Because of the new laws I am back on the Internet again and I feel that my original sentence has just been re-imposed on me.
Now in 2013 my family is falling apart and homeless right along with me living in shelters. Had I known that they were going to change the laws like this! I would have never started a family in the first place, but it's too late for that now. Now I know that my civil rights have been violated on both federal and state levels. But what can I possibly do about it?
Some Act right

Saint Louis, MO

#113 Mar 10, 2013
I agree that their are a lot of sex offences out there that are none registerable, with no victims. However, I think that if theirs are going to be life time registry then for the people who have been registering for 20 years or more, and if they only committed one count, or have been accused of only one count of a sex crime; then I say this. They should still have to Register, but only for law enforcement's viewing purposes.If they have controlled their sexual behavior for the last 20 years take them off the Public Registry. After all a life sentence is for the man in prison, not for the someone who has a family and is trying to be a productive member of society again.
josh

Saint Peters, MO

#114 Mar 18, 2013
if he was convicted for a crime that is no longer a crime, im pretty sure he can get it expunged.
mom of offender

Saint Louis, MO

#115 Mar 18, 2013
I beieve that the law need to change: Victims 15 and under. Offender over the age of 25. Most offenders under that age do not know that what they are doing is wrong especially the teenagers. What they are doing is minor. They are not molesting little kids as do pedophiles. Also, after these young kids have served their sentence or probation and have not committed another act it should be expunged from the records. Sexting is even joked about on TV and in the media. Laws need to change.

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