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Lisa

UK

#1 Jul 1, 2006
hi i live in england at the moment. im lookin to move to the states in the next couple of years. can anyone tell me what its like to live in Maine

house size / prices
weather
universities
etc

cheers
Maisy

United States

#2 Jul 5, 2006
Hi, Lisa. I really cant tell you what it's like to live in Maine, because we havent actually movied yet. We just bought a house and are moving in a few weeks from NJ. The house prices are much more affordable in Maine than they are here in Jersey. In our experience, we bought a reasonably priced, gorgeous house that would have cost us at least 3x the Maine price in New Jersey. As far as the weather, we were in Miane last week, and there was a 20 degree temp difference from NJ.Everyone is warning us about long frozen winters, but we love winter. I hear they get 5 feet of frost there. Bring it!!!Good luck!
Lee

Alamogordo, NM

#3 Jul 5, 2006
Lisa, Maine life is very nice. It is much like the UK, but we don't get near as much rain. Another difference is the snow during the wintertime. Depending on what part of Maine you are living in, you'll get anywhere from a few inches of snow at a time to 3 or 4 feet during a storm. Summers can be very hot and humid at times.

The worse part of living in Maine is the low wages and high taxes. Unless you have a college degree or get lucky enough to land a good job you may struggle to make ends meet. In Maine we learn to "make do" with what we have and make the best of everything.

Us Mainers have a great sense of humor and are famous for it. Where you're from the UK, you'll be considered either a "flatlander" or "from away". The story goes that if you're born outside of Maine on your way into Maine, you'll not be considered "one of us". However, if you're well liked and live to a ripe old age of ,say 100, a likely epitaph that may be placed on your burial stone could read, "She was almost one of us!". Most "Mainuh's" are friendly and almost always willing to lend a hand if needed, so don't take our dry "sensa humuh" too much to heart.

Crime here is fairly low as is the overall population. Our biggest city is Portland with a population close to 64,000. Most of our cities and towns are small.

Maine is world famous for our coastline and fresh seafood. Our Maine lobster is the most popular delicacy. If you haven't had a Maine lobster, then you've never had the real thing. Our shrimp is also very good, as is our haddock, halibut, crab, clams, oysters and mussles, to name just a few.

I hope this helps you, and I highly recommend coming here for a visit before deciding if Maine is for you. I'm sure once you are here you'll fall in love with it and consider it home.
Dawn Central Maine

AOL

#4 Jul 7, 2006
There really is no one answer. Maine is very distinct areas. Rich Coast, poor Downeast and North. Low wages, lack of jobs and high gas prices for long commutes. Maine is a nice place for people from away to come and buy something low cost for them and raise our property taxes even more. Maine is becoming a service state catering to the rich that visit. Welfare, drug abuse and the crime that goes with is it rising very fast. I would not move here.
ekaterina

AOL

#5 Jul 8, 2006
Lisa wrote:
hi i live in england at the moment. im lookin to move to the states in the next couple of years. can anyone tell me what its like to live in Maine
house size / prices
weather
universities
etc
cheers
hi lisa,
in regards to your questions about the state of maine:
check out www.realtor.com for home prices. another one is www.homes.com ,,,the cost of living is lower in maine as compared to the rest of the country, however, towns in maine tend to be very small and jobs are scarce.
missin THE COUNTY

Williston, ND

#6 Jul 13, 2006
There are two Maines. Northern Maine and the "other one" Northern Maine has a sign at the border that reads "MAINE,THE WAY LIFE SHOULD BE" And they mean it too! You will always be "from away" But they dont care.All they ask is that you be nice. As for the other Maine,Well..... Bet "Dawn central is from the other Maine.
Lorraine

Ashburn, VA

#7 Jul 14, 2006
Maine is wonderful! I moved here in 2003 and I wouldn't go back to the city if you gave me a million dollars. The peace and tranquility and the beauty of the countryside are all that I need. Life is quite stress free up here. I'd recommend it for anyone. Real estate is a lot lower priced up here. I got a home with lots of acreage for about 1/8 of what it would have cost in Massachusetts. It's a great place to retire and the people are wonderful. As for the gas prices,(Dawn) shut up and suck it up! There are more important things we should be concerned about. Our gas prices are actually lower than the rest of the nation right now. As for property taxes, you don't know what high taxes are! Some people have nothing better to do than complain. If you don't like where you are, MOVE!!! Sell to someone who will appreciate all that this beautiful state has to offer. We won't miss you! You can find something wrong with any part of the country. When I sit here and look out at what I have, I feel truly blessed.
Penny

Sunnyvale, CA

#9 Jul 20, 2006
Lisa....come on over! I was born and raised in Maine but have been living in exile in southern California for 38 years. My husband I will be going home to Maine permanently within the next year and I can hardly wait!! You asked about universities:as an alumna of the University of Maine...flagship campus in Orono...you can be assured of excellent educational opportunities. You are going to love it...bring your wellies for mud season!
Brittany

United States

#10 Jul 24, 2006
Maine is okay.
It gets wicked cold at times..
And its a pretty Quiet State.
And the Schools Are Great.
Well The ones in my Town Are.

P.s
Where u moving 2??
I Live in Poland/Auburn Maine..
lol i live like right on the Auburn town line.. but my children go to Poland School lol!
John

Bangor, ME

#11 Jul 24, 2006
I think the arrogance and egocentrism of out-of-staters who move into Maine are well characterized by the attitudes like those of Lorraine of Boston. There are regions in Maine where there is essentially very little access to higher education due to cultural obstacles, financial obstacles and the simple fact of geographical isolation which is amplified during the extended winters. Those who grow up in a condition of relative poverty and limited education do not understand the effect of education on standard of living. Also, the distance that one might have to drive to get to a university, say, 60 miles, while meeting the demands of a typically low paying Maine job, usually are prohibitive to social and economic advancement. Approximately 15% of the people in Maine live below the poverty line and a large proportion of the others live in households where both couples must work to account for the low wage levels -- I believe the lowest in New England. There are people I know who are in their 50s who only make $9.50 an hour -- what I made working part time in high school in CT over a decade a ago. It is a lovely State. A bit backward and provincial, but also benefitting from the absence of intense development, industrialization and urbanization as you may find in Metro Boston, if that suits your taste. Disregard the petty and snide elitism of others who do not understand what it means to grow up in poverty. The so-called poor people of Maine are strong in character and tradition, and what unfortunately happens is when the younger generation learns how to make ends meet, they also leave the state for better opportunity. Recently, property reevaluations state-wide have caused real estate taxes to nearly double in some cases, forcing some older Mainers out of homes they have lived in for decades. The simple-minded advice offered by ignorant people like Lorraine don't seem to take into account the fact that some people are unable to draw upon additional resources, and the callousness of the options are clear when people sell their life's work as a result of economic necessity and must move into an apartment or move to an even lower standard of living.
andy taylor miss

Mississippi State, MS

#13 Jul 25, 2006
voice from the wilderness wrote:
<quoted text> Hey! I live in Maine, nd Tha povity is so that the powa fogot wat bein powa is. Thaya is all kinda industry hea . Yah got the job a unloadin the stuff outa the summa camps when the flatlandas all go home fu tha winta, nd thays nut checks that go out betwwn tha fist an tha therd. nd as fa as I kin see the edjewkashon is ok too. I was jist little wen I leand ta roll a fattie in skool. Then thes the art a runnin ova tha deea with the truk. Is Legel to keep as many as ya kin run ova, the trick is giten em tyed down fist. Fiddleheaden, shrimp peelin, bluebrees ta rake, tippin, wood cuttin, the list goes on an on. But if ya got some standad a livin thayt is diffrent, nd yah git hea an deside yoo gonna change it, than ya run inta problems. As fa as waqes gos I no lots peple tha liv on les ten $500 bucks a month. Wonda how? come on and find out!
DOAN FORGET FEEDING TURIST DOUBLE DIPT CLAMS CRAM CHOWDER THICK AS CEMENT AN XPLAIN Y THEM HOT DAWGS ARE SO DANG RED AYUH N WORKIN IN BAH HARBOR FOR 5.5 MONTHS JUST LONG ENOUGH TO NOT GET UNENJOYMENT
John

Coopers Mills, ME

#14 Jul 25, 2006
I very much enjoy the postings of the phoneys who claim they're from Maine while in the meantime their ISPs are accurately logged as originating from another state altogether.
Lorraine

Ashburn, VA

#15 Jul 25, 2006
To John from Bangor,
You're the one who's ignorant! I know firsthand what poverty is all about. That kind of messes up your theory about me just a bit. And as far the ones you call ignorant whose addresses come up as out of state, so does mine. I don't know what's up with that, but I never lived in Boston. You really need to get a life and thank God for what you have. Living here saved my life and it's given me a peace in my heart that never existed before. You really are a jerk. When you don't know the whole story, you need to shut your mouth.
Lorraine
John wrote:
I think the arrogance and egocentrism of out-of-staters who move into Maine are well characterized by the attitudes like those of Lorraine of Boston. There are regions in Maine where there is essentially very little access to higher education due to cultural obstacles, financial obstacles and the simple fact of geographical isolation which is amplified during the extended winters. Those who grow up in a condition of relative poverty and limited education do not understand the effect of education on standard of living. Also, the distance that one might have to drive to get to a university, say, 60 miles, while meeting the demands of a typically low paying Maine job, usually are prohibitive to social and economic advancement. Approximately 15% of the people in Maine live below the poverty line and a large proportion of the others live in households where both couples must work to account for the low wage levels -- I believe the lowest in New England. There are people I know who are in their 50s who only make $9.50 an hour -- what I made working part time in high school in CT over a decade a ago. It is a lovely State. A bit backward and provincial, but also benefitting from the absence of intense development, industrialization and urbanization as you may find in Metro Boston, if that suits your taste. Disregard the petty and snide elitism of others who do not understand what it means to grow up in poverty. The so-called poor people of Maine are strong in character and tradition, and what unfortunately happens is when the younger generation learns how to make ends meet, they also leave the state for better opportunity. Recently, property reevaluations state-wide have caused real estate taxes to nearly double in some cases, forcing some older Mainers out of homes they have lived in for decades. The simple-minded advice offered by ignorant people like Lorraine don't seem to take into account the fact that some people are unable to draw upon additional resources, and the callousness of the options are clear when people sell their life's work as a result of economic necessity and must move into an apartment or move to an even lower standard of living.
John

Coopers Mills, ME

#16 Jul 25, 2006
My theory entailed proposing that you are arrogant, egocentric, snide, ignorant, callous and simple-minded. Your glib comment to another poster: "(Dawn) shut up and suck it up!" and the remainder of your opinionated and crude comments here merely reinforce this idea. Please stay in Boston with the rest of your whole story and your ill-mannered, poorly educated and frenetic brethren.
Tired of the Big City

Silver Spring, MD

#18 Jul 25, 2006
My husband and I are planning a move to Maine this coming spring. We have been working toward this goal for two years now and an opportunity has come up that will allow us to make the move. We have two boys 10 and 4. We are trying to identify what area would be best for the boys to grow up in. Does anyone know which areas would be good for kids? We are tired of huge property and school taxes that only offer us overcrowded schools, bare bones curriculums and crowded highway commutes. Any help is appreciated.
Wanda

United States

#20 Jul 26, 2006
I have been vacationing in Maine since I was 4 years old. I found in general as I got older the people to be nice, friendly, and helpful. My parents were lucky enough to purchase a small summer cottage 20 years ago. I do have a problem with how we are treated once we became seasonal owners of property. We pay taxes just like everyone else, however the basics services we receive are hardly the same. After 40 years of visting Maine, I find that local government treats seasonal oweners with contempt and lack of respect. I personally have witnessed a local destroy wooded property, change the natural shoreline, commit assualt, and steal property. When the "sheriff" was called he wouldn't come stating the area was private property! HELLO!!!! Did the EPA come no, did the police come no, and yet this man continues without being challenged. This says to me that he has paid off the local government yahoo! So move to Maine at your own risk. You will never be treated as a local but always an outsider.
Brittany

United States

#22 Jul 26, 2006
Poland Community Is A Great School
Its In Poland Maine.
My daughter went there but now shes in 8th grade!
Tired of the Big City

Silver Spring, MD

#23 Jul 26, 2006
Thanks Brittany I will check that out. Now as far as being an outsider we are outsiders where we live now...and we've been here for 8 years. As soon as I speak people realize I'm not from here, and I identify with being a New Yorker anyway. That said, we don't hunt, we are not load, and my husband is a country boy....it's his turn to pick a place to live and he picks Maine. I can't imagine that an entire state would we unwelcoming to one small family looking for a better place for their kids. Most of the people I've met up there and talked to from there rave about the state as a great place to live. So we are on our way, but any more help as to where would be appreciated. Thanks again:)
Tired of the Big City

Silver Spring, MD

#24 Jul 26, 2006
I'm sorry we are not loud...not not load...LOL
Lorraine from Maine

Ashburn, VA

#25 Jul 27, 2006
Ooooh! Such big words for such an ill educated moron!
The original question from Lisa from the UK still stands. This is a wonderful place to live Lisa, in spite of people like John from Bangor. I love it here. Real estate prices are much lower than in the lower New England states. There are also very good universities here. The weather can get a bit frigid in the winter, but I don't mind it. To look out your window and see softly falling snow is a sight to behold, especially when you live in the woods as I do. There are beautiful places to visit, such as Moosehead Lake and Acadia National Park. We've had a lot of rain this year. I don't complain. I look at it this way. If you don't like where you live, then move somewhere else instead of complaining all the time. I hope I've helped you.
As for you John, I won't comment anymore about your notes. You're not worth the time.
John wrote:
My theory entailed proposing that you are arrogant, egocentric, snide, ignorant, callous and simple-minded. Your glib comment to another poster: "(Dawn) shut up and suck it up!" and the remainder of your opinionated and crude comments here merely reinforce this idea. Please stay in Boston with the rest of your whole story and your ill-mannered, poorly educated and frenetic brethren.

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