Less focus on immigration likely at G...

Less focus on immigration likely at GA legislature

There are 11 comments on the Rome News story from Dec 11, 2011, titled Less focus on immigration likely at GA legislature. In it, Rome News reports that:

Immigration was a dominant topic during the last legislative session in Georgia and while it's likely to surface again when lawmakers return to the Capitol next month, it probably won't take as large a share of the spotlight.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Rome News.

“Assimilate & Speak English!”

Since: Jan 07

Lansing, IL - now: Pomp Bch FL

#1 Dec 11, 2011
Remove E-verify? I think not. Make it as hard as possible for the illegals to get jobs.
Different name

United States

#2 Dec 11, 2011
Rebel wrote:
Remove E-verify? I think not. Make it as hard as possible for the illegals to get jobs.
Recent studies released by the Georgia Restaurant Association and the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association paint a dark picture for the impact of HB 87.
According to Karen Bremer, the Executive Director for the Georgia Restaurant Association, workers who held jobs as dishwashers, line cooks, or janitors in restaurants are fleeing the state in droves costing restaurant owners thousands of dollars in lost sales.
"When asked about current labor availability, three quarters of the restaurants surveyed are experiencing a labor shortage," said Bremer. "Workers are scared to come to Georgia."
Bremer said despite Georgia's 10 percent unemployment rate owners report Georgians are not stepping up to fill the positions.
It is a similar situation, according to Charles Hall, with the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.
"Food in America is a national security issue," Hall said. "If we can't solve the immigration problem in the U.S. we may be dependant on food just like we are on foreign oil."
According to their study, the effects on Georgia's agricultural economy have been devastating.
Hall said $300 million is the estimated loss in harvested crops statewide,$1 billion dollars in total economic impact on Georgia's economy and untold millions in the losses to the economies of small towns and farmers dependent on immigrant labor.
Hall said the labor shortage is so prolific, many farmers, are re-thinking how they will farm next year.
Dee Dee Dee

Emmaus, PA

#3 Dec 12, 2011
Different name wrote:
<quoted text>Recent studies released by the Georgia Restaurant Association and the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association paint a dark picture for the impact of HB 87.
According to Karen Bremer, the Executive Director for the Georgia Restaurant Association, workers who held jobs as dishwashers, line cooks, or janitors in restaurants are fleeing the state in droves costing restaurant owners thousands of dollars in lost sales.
"When asked about current labor availability, three quarters of the restaurants surveyed are experiencing a labor shortage," said Bremer. "Workers are scared to come to Georgia."
Bremer said despite Georgia's 10 percent unemployment rate owners report Georgians are not stepping up to fill the positions.
It is a similar situation, according to Charles Hall, with the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.
"Food in America is a national security issue," Hall said. "If we can't solve the immigration problem in the U.S. we may be dependant on food just like we are on foreign oil."
According to their study, the effects on Georgia's agricultural economy have been devastating.
Hall said $300 million is the estimated loss in harvested crops statewide,$1 billion dollars in total economic impact on Georgia's economy and untold millions in the losses to the economies of small towns and farmers dependent on immigrant labor.
Hall said the labor shortage is so prolific, many farmers, are re-thinking how they will farm next year.
These poor criminals are losing money because they refuse to follow the law and hire legal workers. How sad it is when criminals can no longer profit by exploiting illegal aliens and American tax payers. Why not post some facts on the honest farmers, restaurant owners, contractors, etc. whose businesses have been saved because they no longer have to compete with criminals enterprises that have been forcing them out of business.
Dee Dee Dee

Emmaus, PA

#6 Dec 12, 2011
Spam Spam Spam Spam lovely Spam wonderful Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam.
Different name

Magee, MS

#7 Dec 12, 2011
Dee Dee Dee wrote:
Spam Spam Spam Spam lovely Spam wonderful Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam.
ok you aren't offering a damnn thing to the table ? That's your best shot ? Calling the news spam, even u should be doing better than that, come on
Dee Dee Dee

Emmaus, PA

#8 Dec 12, 2011
Different name wrote:
<quoted text> ok you aren't offering a damnn thing to the table ? That's your best shot ? Calling the news spam, even u should be doing better than that, come on
Posting the same unsubstantiated stories numerous times on different threads is considered spamming by most people. The fact is that no matter how often these criminals cry to the media about supposed labor shortages none of them have made any real attempt to hire Americans, immigrants or H2A workers. They are not concerned with the plight of illegal aliens, immigrants or American citizens. Their only concern is that they are allowed to continue to profit by exploiting illegal aliens violating safety, tax and labor laws with no consequence while forcing honest employers out of business. If you could post some facts related to this subject that would be helpful but repeatedly posting the same opinion pieces produced by the same criminals that benefit from illegal labor with no supporting evidence offers nothing.
hang the spammer

Chicago, IL

#9 Dec 12, 2011
Different name wrote:
<quoted text> ok you aren't offering a damnn thing to the table ? That's your best shot ? Calling the news spam, even u should be doing better than that, come on
Your posts are spam. They repeatedly flog a dead horse in an effort to make it seem new with a different title. GFY...moron.
racer42

Hayward, CA

#10 Dec 12, 2011
Different name wrote:
<quoted text> ok you aren't offering a damnn thing to the table ? That's your best shot ? Calling the news spam, even u should be doing better than that, come on
Congratulations, you've been nominated as the most prolific spammer on Topix. Should win hands down. Not much competition. First prize is two weeks in Waterproof, Louisiana. Have fun.

“Assimilate & Speak English!”

Since: Jan 07

Lansing, IL - now: Pomp Bch FL

#11 Dec 12, 2011
Different name wrote:
<quoted text>Recent studies released by the Georgia Restaurant Association and the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association paint a dark picture for the impact of HB 87.
According to Karen Bremer, the Executive Director for the Georgia Restaurant Association, workers who held jobs as dishwashers, line cooks, or janitors in restaurants are fleeing the state in droves costing restaurant owners thousands of dollars in lost sales.
"When asked about current labor availability, three quarters of the restaurants surveyed are experiencing a labor shortage," said Bremer. "Workers are scared to come to Georgia."
Bremer said despite Georgia's 10 percent unemployment rate owners report Georgians are not stepping up to fill the positions.
It is a similar situation, according to Charles Hall, with the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.
"Food in America is a national security issue," Hall said. "If we can't solve the immigration problem in the U.S. we may be dependant on food just like we are on foreign oil."
According to their study, the effects on Georgia's agricultural economy have been devastating.
Hall said $300 million is the estimated loss in harvested crops statewide,$1 billion dollars in total economic impact on Georgia's economy and untold millions in the losses to the economies of small towns and farmers dependent on immigrant labor.
Hall said the labor shortage is so prolific, many farmers, are re-thinking how they will farm next year.
These employers don't want to pay taxes and provide a safe work environment so they'd rather circumvent our laws and hire illegals. Too bad for them. If they can't stay in business without illegal labor, then they shouldn't be in business. Period.

Alabama's unemployment rate is down due to their strict immigration laws and the illegals leaving.
Different name

Magee, MS

#12 Dec 12, 2011
Rebel wrote:
<quoted text>
These ...
Alabama's unemployment rate is down due to their strict immigration laws and the illegals leaving.
The rate fell from 9.8 percent in September to 9.3 percent in October, and Hammon, the House majority leader and primary co-sponsor of HB56, latched onto the immigration law as the reason for the steep drop.

With all the national and international criticism Alabama is getting for passing such a severe immigration law, Hammon no doubt is grasping for something positive about the law to tout.

"More Alabamians are working today," Hammon said, "thanks in part to our decision to crack down on illegal immigration."

Well, not so fast.

Alabama and two other states, Michigan and Minnesota, each saw a half-percent drop in their unemployment rates in October, the largest in the nation. Neither Michigan nor Minnesota have draconian immigration laws in place.

State Sen. Bryan Taylor, R-Prattville, said three of the five states with the steepest unemployment rate drops in October have passed tough immigration laws. "It's hard to draw a causal relationship conclusively, but it's certainly plausible," he said.

It is true that South Carolina and Utah, which did pass overreaching immigration laws, also had significant drops in unemployment, but their laws aren't nearly as tough as Alabama's.

But wait. Georgia and Arizona didn't make the top 12 states with significant drops in unemployment rates, and they have laws like South Carolina and Utah. Vermont did make the top 12. So did Pennsylvania. And Idaho. And Maryland. And none of those has Alabama-style immigration laws.

Something else must be going on, and the analysts say, yes, indeed, there is:

People are dropping off unemployment rolls because they've become discouraged by not being able to find a job and have stopped looking, according to an analysis by Arise Citizens' Policy Project. Alabama's labor force shrank by more than 6,000 workers in October, and the labor force has been shrinking since June. Economists say a shrinking labor force makes it easier for a state to post an unemployment rate decline, even if job growth is small.

While Alabama created fewer than 10,000 jobs in October, many of those were seasonal jobs and about half were state and local government jobs. Government jobs can't be held by undocumented workers, so those were not jobs being filled by Alabamians because undocumented workers were leaving the state.

The job sectors that do use immigrant workers -- restaurants, hotels, construction and manufacturing -- lost jobs in October. If undocumented workers are vacating those jobs, Alabama workers aren't rushing to fill them. Indeed, this week, the Associated General Contractors, based in Arlington, Va., said Alabama having the second-highest number of construction jobs lost from September to October -- 3.2 percent or 2,700 jobs -- is related to construction crews leaving the state in the wake of the immigration law.

Just because Hammon and other supporters of the harsh immigration law want to believe it has had a role in lowering the state's unemployment rate doesn't mean it has.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#13 Dec 12, 2011
again these folks who hire illegal alien which is a crime whine when they lose out,wonder if dope dealers do that when their customers sober up,it is the same thing or looks like it.

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